Janne Kyttanen on Creativity in 3D Printing

Janne Kyttanen is a whirlwind of innovation, ideas and designs. The pioneering 3D printing designer was one of the first to couple design and 3D printing, the first to sell 3D printed design goods and is a leader in creativity in our space. Janne thinks that we need more creativity in 3D printing. Previously we interviewed Janne whose also the nicest VC in the world on investing in 3D printing, we had him on for our 3DPod podcast as well and we have another interview with him here on his own background in 3D printing. Yes, we’re huge fans of Janne and his work here and we thought we’d let him shine a light on creativity as well.

So why is creativity important? 

Without creativity, you simply won’t be able to come up with anything new.

Should companies all be creative? Even in space or medical device?

All areas require creativity.

How does creativity help my bottom line? 

Many mathematical models can be created for this how it helps your bottom line, but in my articles, I am using a basic correlation between starting a company with “an idea” to what that idea is worth. All those metrics are well known and the reason why I am making the connection between creativity and starting a company, is because a disruptive idea for a startup pretty much boils down to creativity. No disrespect to cafes or bakeries for example, but if your startup idea revolves around starting a basic corner café, I don’t put that in the category of a creative startup, which could generate astronomical value. You have X amount of seats in a café and your café is open for X amount of time per day. The absolute maximum revenue your café is able to generate is already pre-defined. I put that kind of company in the bucket of “innovation”…aka an incremental improvement to what is already known.

Should everyone in the organization be more creative or should we have key creative people?

Everybody should be creative in their roles. Even creative accountants. On top of that, every organization should have a chief creative officer, who is accountable for measurable creative throughput.

I think design thinking is for idiots. I don’t take a two-day first aid course and then apply “medical thinking” to my business nor do I then think I can do what a doctor does. Please don’t tell me you’ve gone over to the design thinking dark side? 

I am not talking about design thinking here. Where most companies go wrong is in change management and implementation. You can hire a “design thinking” guru to give a lecture to your staff and after that lecture, everybody will think: that was interesting and they return back to doing what they were going 30 minutes ago. If proper metrics are not put in place, nothing will stick.

Why is it difficult for large companies to innovate? 

Innovation is fairly straight forward for companies, but due to a large amount of red tape, even changing small things, gets difficult. I am really referring to creativity here, which is practically impossible for companies if they don’t even have people in the ranks who are accountable for results. Companies think, it all somehow magically happens, but what is more magical is that your star people are using your money and resources in order to work on their own business under your watch, whilst they can do their existing job with their left hand. Recipe for disaster.

3D printed metal sofa

Sofa so Good Fully functional lounger coated in high polish copper and chrome by Janne Kyttanen

How can I innovate better? 

Read my Forbes article. Download the 6 step printout. Sticker it on your fridge and you are onto a flying start.

Isn’t lack of innovation a lack of budget and responsibility? 

It’s a lack of intelligence.

Which teams should innovate? 

Whether you are an accountant or lawyer, you can always innovate on how to do your job more effectively.

If everyone starts innovating will we be able to keep to our processes in check? 

Voila…and there comes the chief creative officer who is the gatekeeper. If you don’t have it in place, all ideas just circulate in the air and nobody is catching them.

How do we know we’re on the right track with our innovations? 

Nobody really knows before you start, but the trick is to implement it in your system and start building metrics behind it.

Won’t innovations lead to lots of silly side projects and trial balloons? 

Yes. Such things as the internet, the computer, the relativity theory, the wheel, the satellite or electricity.

Won’t it be expensive to innovate?

It is far more expensive to run out of business.

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What is Metrology Part 16: Introductory Coding

Anaconda

Today we will be looking into the basics of image processing and coding within Python. We will start with 2D images and learn some elementary skills in terms of setup and coding with image processing. With all of the research being done in this metrology series, it will be fun to do some interactive and project-oriented learning that focuses our attention to the different subject matter we have touched so far. Be prepared to deep dive a bit more with me today.

The first step in coding is choosing and setting up one’s developing environment. This choice is done through knowledge of what language you are using, as well as personal preference. I myself have basic scripting skills within Python. My first inclination for coding is the Python language. This limits the scope of development tools that are available to me. I also am coding with the intent of doing image processing work. This dictates my workflow and environment. 

Command Line Example

I decided to develop with the Anaconda environment for Python. The steps for downloading and running Anaconda can be a bit confusing if you do not have previous experience with a command line. A command line is the space to the right of the command prompt on an all-text display mode on a computer monitor (usually a CRT or LCD panel) in which a user enters commands and data. Commands are generally issued by typing them in at the command line and then pressing the ENTER key, which passes them to the shell. For someone completely new to coding though, there are various tutorials and online resources that are instruction based. I will layout the process that I used to get my development environment setup:

Download the Anaconda package through here.

When the installer gives you the option to add this to your environment path be sure to do so. It is important for later interactions with your computer’s command line. 

Use the following conda command in your command line when Anaconda is installed:

conda install jupyter 

Once this command is entered, your computer will unzip the jupyter notebook package from the web. A jupyter notebook is where one can place their Python code. It can also be executed and tested within this environment. It is an awesome tool for developing.

Use the following conda command in your command line after completing the previous installation:

conda install pillow

Once this command is entered, your computer will unzip the pillow package from the web. The pillow package is a great package for Python because it imports functions that are specific to image processing techniques. Once those installations are done, open a new command line and type in the following command:

jupyter notebook

Jupyter First Glance

This will open up a jupyter notebook environment within one of your browser tabs automatically. From there we are now able to start coding and have some fun. There is a button on the upper right hand corner that says new. Click this and press Python 3 for the ability to make a file for developing. The initial popup window should correspond to how your desktop environment is setup in terms of files. 

Now that we have all of this setup, please take a look at this online tutorial here. In this tutorial it is one should copy and type all of the text that appears within the code posted. Without exact formatting, various errors may pop up as you run your program. This is the more challenging part of programming. Being able to spot errors and bugs when we are creating projects is the essence of a succinct programmer. There will also be various items, words, and functions that seem complex. It is important for one to learn everything that seems foreign to them if they want to become an excellent programmer. 

Antialiasing Example

I myself had no real understanding of the word antialiasing. It is something I have seen before in my camera settings of a DSLR I use, and I have seen it within programs such as Photoshop, but I really did not understand what it was. Once I saw it in the context of code, I really had to understand what it meant. In the particular code snippet I copied from the tutorial, the goal was to create images that were at a certain size and shape. In order for images to be compressed, antialiasing is an important factor. Antialiasing is a technique used to add greater realism to a digital image by smoothing jagged edges on curved lines and diagonals. This is a computer graphics technique that allows for sharper resolutions for a photo based on precise geometry. Some of the “imperfections” of an image may be distorted or destroyed due to this. I am certain that in order to do processing such as photogrammetry and image stitching, a computer would have to have exact geometries that can be added together to form a 3D image. This causes the 3D image to have less precision overall in terms of actual dimensions. I wonder what is the margin of error for a 3D image when photogrammetry techniques are accounting for antialiasing. 

Lastly, I learned about an alpha channel. Alpha channels are color components that represent the degree of transparency (or opacity) of a color (i.e., the red, green and blue channels). They are used to determine how a pixel is rendered when blended with another. It now begs the question of how precise are metrology and laser scanning devices in terms of picking up color. These are follow up questions I will be researching more in depth.

Overall, this is the first step into the world of image processing. I am excited to continue research as well as build out fun projects that will show off this field a bit more.

The post What is Metrology Part 16: Introductory Coding appeared first on 3DPrint.com | The Voice of 3D Printing / Additive Manufacturing.

3D printing meets felt in new additive manufacturing technique

A really cool fabric gets an even cooler upgrade.

via dezeen

Acoustic panels and other architectural elements can be made in complex 3D forms using a robotic needle felting process developed by researchers at the Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning in the US.

Wes McGee, Tsz Yan Ng and Asa Peller liken their process to 3D printing, or additive manufacturing, because it also involves the digitally engineered layering of material.

Read more!

Enabling the Future: 3D Printed Frog Arm Prosthetic for Epilepsy Patients

While there is always the question of whether life imitates art, or vice versa, science and innovation today often imitate nature—and we humans seem to be getting better at it. A recent case and point involve a new e-NABLE prosthetic called the Frog Arm, developed by e-NABLE designer and volunteer, Peter Binkley.

Most of us take the ability to open our hands and flex our fingers completely for granted. For kids with severe epilepsy who have undergone difficult treatments, however, this can be impossible.

Upon discovering the enormous challenges kids with epilepsy face, Binkley began working with the Brain Recovery Project to create a functional limb replacement for children dealing with life after hemispherectomies—a surgery removing a portion of the brain’s hemisphere to help prevent dangerous seizures.

“In early 2016, I was approached by the Brain Recovery Project. They wanted me to pick up on Elizabeth Jackson’s amazing Airy Arm project. Elizabeth created a wearable arm that allowed a user to open his paralyzed fingers. They wanted something with a similar action. That is, a wearable device that opens the fingers via an extension of the elbow. The BRP wanted me to design a more low-profile, easy-to-wear solution. In September, I began sketching ideas for the Frog Arm,” states Binkley.

“Frog Hand (Frog Arm 0.1) would have been too difficult to manufacture. And I hadn’t even met a test pilot for the device yet, so I had a lot to learn.”

He met with his ‘test subject’ Cameron a few times, noting her exceptional social and academic skills despite the extreme medical treatments she had to endure. Soon after taking measurements and considering the level of functionality required in the prosthetic, Binkley created a 3D printed prototype accentuated with leather, screws, and a variety of cables:

“I was trying to make a device that could give users control of the wrist. With paralyzed tendons, flexing the wrist extends the fingers and extending the wrist flexes the fingers. I was trying to use that biomechanical fact to advantage. Large hair elastics hold the wrist in extension, so the normal position of the hand is closed. When the user extends the elbow, it pulls a cable that flexes the wrist, thereby opening the fingers.”

Numerous iterations were required for version 0.2, so Binkley moved on to the Frog Arm 0.3, using a 3D model and 3D printed forming blocks for better hinge design. He was forced to keep on editing his designs though, moving from 0.3 to 0.4 quickly also:

“The leap from version 0.3 to 0.4 was a big one. I had to attach directly to the fingers somehow. It seemed to me that Cameron’s only needed to be able to actively open her fingers, since they close on their own and remain closed at rest,” said Binkley.

Binkley used an elbow hinge for manipulating the cable, along with nylon tubing to serve as a braking system—allowing the fingers to move ‘relative to the carpals but not bound to the forearm.’ Leather cots made of distressed goat hide were placed around the fingers also. The forearm was not a good fit, however, and Binkley forged ahead to version 0.5.

While Cameron continued to have issues with finger extension due to such long-term paralysis, Binkley decided to discourage regular wear of the device for her due to fear of physical damage. He is continuing to work with another test pilot though, and his experimental open-source design has been released for the Frog Arm on Thingiverse.

e-NABLE has made a huge impact around the world in creating prosthetics for individuals of all ages in need of limb replacement. While these medical devices are meant to add to the quality of life for patients, many of the designs are spectacular—from those meant to help kids play violin to integrating complex features like parametrics, and even adding to veterinary medicine with bird prosthetics.

What do you think of this news? Let us know your thoughts! Join the discussion of this and other 3D printing topics at 3DPrintBoard.com.

[Source / Images: Enabling the Future]

The post Enabling the Future: 3D Printed Frog Arm Prosthetic for Epilepsy Patients appeared first on 3DPrint.com | The Voice of 3D Printing / Additive Manufacturing.

Promoting Additive Manufacturing: GE Additive Lichtenfels Facility Opening Celebrated in Bavaria

While GE Additive continues to make enormous strides in 3D printing and additive manufacturing, they continue to procure large facilities around the globe for production too. Now, they are adding a 40,000-square meter facility in Lechtenfels, Bavaria as a response to growing customer demand for AM technology.

The ultra-modern campus will be called GE Additive Lichtenfels, allowing progressive clients to make the transition to 3D printing, AM techniques, and lean manufacturing overall. The site will also house the GE Additive Concept Laser team. Opening ceremonies were officiated by Bavarian Minister of Sciences Bernd Sibler, along with a mix of GE business partners and politicians.

“In Bavaria, global players find exceptional conditions for successful and future-forward investments to take to the world. The opening of the new GE Additive Lichtenfels facility in Upper Franconia is one such example,” said Bavarian Minister of Sciences Bernd Sibler. “It is a great win for the people in the region and there many valuable opportunities for business and science to cooperate. The future of the additive manufacturing industry is being shaped in Lichtenfels.”

There will be 700 employees working at GE Additive Lichtenfels, and a recent press release from GE Additive states that ‘transition in production’ is already underway, with the office area still under construction but slated to be finished next year—at which time the Concept Laser teams will be moving.

“Today is great milestone for GE Additive, for Frank and Kerstin Herzog and the entire Concept Laser family,” said Jason Oliver, President & CEO of GE Additive. “There has been a lot of interest in the building over the past three years, both locally and from our customers. We want this modern, Lean manufacturing production facility, here in Bavaria, to become a global focal point for the additive industry.

Oliver also noted that while the new lean manufacturing facility is meant to be a central point for AM processes, their mission has been to create a ‘collaborative environment’ for both clients and teams. GE Additive also makes a good working environment a priority—beginning in the early planning stages.

“GE Additive Concept Laser is a pioneer and world-class in 3D printing,” said Bavarian Prime Minister Dr. Markus Söder. “The new campus in Lichtenfels is a technology and job motor for industry 4.0 in Upper Franconia. Technological leadership in rural areas, large industrial investments throughout the state – that is hightech made in Bavaria.”

GE Additive Lichtenfels inauguration ribbon cutting. From Left: Heidrun Piewernetz (District President Oberfranken), Andres Hügerich (Mayor of Lichtenfels), Debbra Rogers (Chief Customer Officer, GE Additive), Jason Oliver (President & CEO, GE Additive), Christian Meißner (District Chife Executive Lichtenfels), Kerstin and Frank Herzog (Founder of Concept Laser), Bernd Sibler (Staatsminister fur Wissenschaft und Kunst, Bayern) and Emmi Zeulner (Member of German Federal Parliament). (Photo: GE Additive, GEADPR025)

GE Additive has been a powerhouse when it comes to 3D printing and additive manufacturing, with numerous sites and facilities opened around the world from Pennsylvania to Munich, even to include a customer experience center. They have also expanded their Arcam EBM Center recently.

GE Additive includes additive machine providers Concept Laser and Arcam EBM; along with additive material provider AP&C.

GE Additive Lichtenfels campus inside.
(Photo: GE Additive, GEADPR025, image credit Wilm Visuals)

What do you think of this news? Let us know your thoughts! Join the discussion of this and other 3D printing topics at 3DPrintBoard.com.

GE Additive Lichtenfels campus outside.
(Photo: GE Additive, GEADPR025, image credit Wilm Visuals)

[Source / Images: GE Additive]

The post Promoting Additive Manufacturing: GE Additive Lichtenfels Facility Opening Celebrated in Bavaria appeared first on 3DPrint.com | The Voice of 3D Printing / Additive Manufacturing.

Fusion 360 tutorial – Glasses Frames #MonsterM4SK via @ecken

Back with another tutorial, this time a frame for glasses (or a PCB with animated eyes). In this tutorial we’ll take a look at creating a frame for glasses or the Adafruit Monster M4SK. I use the loft featuring to seamlessly blend two surfaces together. The trick is to use tangent profiles!

Adafruit Monster M4SK
https://www.adafruit.com/product/4343

Monster M4SK Case Learn Guide
https://learn.adafruit.com/monster-mask-case/

Project Video

3D Printing Projects Playlist:

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Timelapse Tuesday Playlist:

Stratasys 3D prints directly onto clothing for threeASFOUR collection at New York Fashion Week

As New York Fashion Week (NYFW) 2019 draws to a close, the prestigious clothing event flaunted a number of flamboyant designs and inventive collections. 3D printing has played an increasingly relevant role within recent major fashion events due to the creative freedom it offers designers, and this year’s NYFW was no different. 3D printing from Stratasys […]

Enter the 2020 Additive Manufacturing Strategies Startup Competition

February 11th through 12th 2020 will see another Additive Manufacturing Strategies Event in Boston. A small scale summit-like event for industry leaders specific to the metal printing and medical 3D printing market these events bring together and educate a select number of highly interested professionals. Additive Manufacturing Strategies events are focused on professionals implementing 3D printing in manufacturing and production for metals, dental and medical.

As a part of this event, VC Fund Asimov Ventures will once again be hosting a startup competition. This competition will see you:

  • Apply to compete for a $15,000 investment from VC fund Asimov Ventures.
  • The winning company will be profiled on 3DPrint.com.

The timeline of the Competition is:

  • Deadline: December 1, 2019
  • Interviews: December 2-9, 2019
  • Selections Announced: December 15, 2019
  • Competition Date: February 11, 2020

The rules are:

  1. Applications must be submitted by December 1, 2019
  2. In order to compete you must be available to pitch in-person February 11, 2019, in Boston, MA (travel not provided)
  3. If selected to compete you will receive a free conference pass to Additive Manufacturing Strategies.
  4. Please note that due to the overwhelming number of submissions we receive only companies which are selected will be contacted
  5. Revenue cannot be greater than $500,000
  6. Software, Hardware, Materials and Bioprinting focus is welcome

Apply Here.

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