3D Printing in India: Slow Adoption & What the Future Holds

Researchers from India are exploring the economic potential of 3D printing technology globally, and in relation to their own country, releasing the findings of their study in ‘A Study on The Entrepreneurial Opportunities, Global and Indian Economy in 3D Printing Sector.’

Taking a look at Industry 4.0 and the transformative nature of 3D printing in manufacturing, the authors consider the future, and especially the opportunities that should be available within India. This is especially true as digital fabrication has evolved substantially from a rapid prototyping tool to a catalyst for change in manufacturing complex, functional components—many of which are already critical to organizations like NASA, the military, automotive companies, and more.

India has been slower to embrace 3D printing, with the exception of medical applications where progress has been notable—especially in the area of implants (check out the case we followed on their 3D printed ear).

3D fabricated implantable ears [Image courtesy of: Times of India]

As 3D printing and accompanying technologies continue to evolve at an accelerated rate, they are impacting many industries in India; however, the authors point out the realities of converting from traditional methods to more progressive technologies—mainly that within the scientific realm—embracing such change can be overwhelming and many are resistant.

The construction industry in particular has a long way to go in India, along with other applications where 3D printing remains surprisingly unused in comparison with Europe and the US. As for startups, the authors realize that, while they may be entirely focused on 3D printing, it may not be “sufficient to show significant GDP growth.” Affordability and accessibility to technology are still needed in India, along with “more knowledge, and developmental work in terms of performance.”

3D printing service bureaus may prove to be profitable for some entrepreneurs, and in some cases, it may be the only technological service they offer, while yet others still have a stronger focus on conventional methods of manufacturing parts. The researchers also mention the importance of “3D printing groups” as users encourage each other to innovate further. In the midst of such evolution and revolution, the usefulness of prototyping should not be downplayed either.

In referring to data from a previous annual Wohlers report, the authors cite the following data:

“… more than 278,000 desktop IMAGES printers (less than $5,000) were purchased worldwide this past year. The additive manufacturing (AM) markets were up 25.9% by the Wohlers Review 2016 to $5.165 million in 2015.”

Their 2018 report shows the following:

“In 2017 the AM industry was generally about 21 trillion, with nearly all AM goods and services around the world exceeding $7,336 billion. The rise in 2017 will be comparable to a 17.4 percent increase in 2016 if Airbus, Adidas, Kia, Toyota, Stryker and many other rms, big and small, achieved a $6.063 and a $25.9 percent growth by 2015. This entire industry estimates $7.336 billion excluding domestic sales.”

Materials have also been up significantly, according to the most recent report, showing that revenue from the metal 3D printing realm grew 41.9 percent, in line with a five-year growth trend over 40 percent each year. Wohlers Associates also stated that “this kind of strong activity among materials suppliers and customers is a telling indicator of the increasing use of AM for production applications.”

It is interesting to note in other recent news (and opinion) also, that the country seems to be on the precipice of entering the market further, but they aren’t there quite yet, citing further 2018 Wohlers data:

“Industry analysis from the Wohlers Report, published in 2018, shows that India accounts for roughly 3% of total units installed across the Asia Pacific region when China hits 35% and Japan 30+%,” says Rajiv Bajaj, managing director, Stratasys India.

Overall, the authors see a “new phase” for 3D printers in India, and recent accessibility to printers like those of HP just introduced in the country last January show definite progress—and in terms of affordability too.

Along with stating that considering the true potential of the future of 3D printing “could make the least materialistic person drool,” the authors point out that there are still questions as to how manufacturing will really be impacted. While they do not expect traditional factories to be eliminated, it is certainly feasible that they will experience a “massive makeover.”

“The moment AM technology will dissipate as typical production procedures, it is rational to expect the decrease of AM systems expense, and consequently, soon the breakeven point will be expected to shift towards the creation of larger production amounts than the one considered. Under Indian native economic circumstances, a large GDP growth has been achieved. In addition, AM systems replace conventional and common production technology,” concluded the researchers.

Other researchers project that India’s presence in the 3D printing market will approach $79 million by 2021, but this depends on further education regarding the technology and whether the average consumer or business owner understands the benefits.

Bahubali’s Mahishmati empire arrangement [Image courtesy of: Sahas Softech][Source / Images: ‘A Study on The Entrepreneurial Opportunities, Global and Indian Economy in 3D Printing Sector’]

The post 3D Printing in India: Slow Adoption & What the Future Holds appeared first on 3DPrint.com | The Voice of 3D Printing / Additive Manufacturing.

New Fusion 360 Layer By Layer! Emboss is BOSS! via @ecken

Taking a look at the new emboss feature recently added to Fusion 360. It’s pretty boss! I made some examples of applying circular and rectangular patterns to embosses. Can we apply an emboss to a surface that has been embossed? Some limitations with self-intersecting and how to do tapered knurling.

Download the examples
https://a360.co/3fwzKbm

3D Printing Projects Playlist:
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLjF7R1fz_OOWD2dJNRIN46uhMCWvNOlbG

3D Hangout Show Playlist:
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLjF7R1fz_OOVgpmWevin2slopw_A3-A8Y

Layer by Layer CAD Tutorials Playlist:
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLjF7R1fz_OOVsMp6nKnpjsXSQ45nxfORb

Timelapse Tuesday Playlist:
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLjF7R1fz_OOVagy3CktXsAAs4b153xpp_

Milling Monday
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLjF7R1fz_OOVL48weqeHiu7aw-_sPhCSA

Nexa3D Acquires NXT Factory, Introduces Eco-Friendly 3D Printing Washing Solvent

While Nexa3D may specialize in manufacturing super-fast stereolithography 3D printers, the company has been branching out recently, and narrowing its focus on the materials side of things. It launched the high-performance polymer xCE-Black in May, followed soon after with the announcement of a partnership with Henkel to commercialize xMED412, a high-impact material for printing biocompatible medical and wearable devices. Now, Nexa3D has announced that xCLEAN, its new eco-friendly washing solvent for resin and photopolymer 3D printers, is commercially available.

“I am very proud of our entire team for stepping-up during this unprecedented pandemic, and  quickly pivoting internal developments and external collaborations to adeptly support our growing customer base and communities. “Throughout this challenging period, we’ve continued to expand the range of our high impact, durable photoplastics, and we are rolling out new productivity tools for the additive manufacturing industry,” said Nexa3D’s CEO and Co-Founder Avi Reichental. “Together with our growing partner network, we are committed to helping our customers improve their design agility, and supply chain resiliency by reducing the time required to produce functional prototypes and production parts from hours to just minutes.”

xCLEAN, compatible with most photopolymeric resin printers, including close loop systems, automated cleaners, and washing units currently on the market, and is safer to handle than other popular cleaning solvents, though it’s not been cleared to use in the cleaning of parts 3D printed out of biocompatible resins.


This material is easy to recycle, as well as recover with the help of a vacuum-assist distillation unit, and doesn’t need any of the typical adherence to shipping regulations or special storage that most post-processing photopolymeric parts require.

“xCLEAN’s development is a powerful reminder that necessity is the mother of invention. We were forced to explore alternatives to isopropyl alcohol (IPA) during the initial Covid-19 surge as IPA became extremely scarce and costs skyrocketed,” explained Nexa3D’s Head of Customer Success Brent Zollinger. ” After considering dozens of candidates, we zeroed in on xCLEAN and quickly embraced it as our go-to cleaning solvent. Having processed thousands of serial production parts in our flexible factory with superior results, we decided to share this incredible cleaner with our customers and invite the entire photopolymer 3D printing community to give it a try.”

Made from molecules that are smaller than DPM and TPM, xCLEAN is extremely effective, and doesn’t have any of the gross, greasy residue that you get with these two alternative materials; just rinse it off with water. It’s also sustainable, with three times the saturation limit of IPA, which means that it lasts three times as long and requires fewer changeovers and generates less waste.

xCLEAN can be ordered for immediate delivery here, or from one of Nexa3D’s authorized resellers. A single 5-gallon container will cost you about $320. To see the material in action, check out the video below:

But materials haven’t been the company’s only focus during COVID-19—the company just announced that it has acquired NXT Factory, which manufactures ultra-fast selective laser sintering (SLS) production systems powered by its proprietary Quantum Laser Sintering (QLS) technology.

“We are thrilled to join forces with Nexa3D and together unleash the power and potential of our products. COVID-19 propelled both of our companies to demonstrate the unique capabilities of our complementary additive manufacturing power as we quickly ramped into full production of personal protective equipment for frontline healthcare workers. This crisis has helped showcase the incredibly rapid and flexible nature of our combined additive manufacturing capabilities compared to traditional manufacturing and demonstrates how vulnerable the global manufacturing supply chain is to unexpected disruptions,” stated Kuba Graczyk, the Co-Founder and CEO of NXT Factory. “Together, we are committed to taking additive manufacturing to the next level and realizing its full potential.”

The two companies have entered into an agreement that states Nexa3D will acquire all the outstanding shares of NXT Factory, and the stockholders and boards of directors of both companies have approved the transaction, the details of which were not disclosed publicly.

By combining NXT Factory and Nexa3D’s high-speed technologies, the company is strengthening its capabilities and portfolio of production-grade materials. Nexa3D will now have access to NXT Factory’s range of powder fusion, supply chain-approved plastics, which will essentially double its addressable market and strongly position it for increased growth in the industry.

Leveraging its relationships with other key material suppliers, Nexa3D will be able to diversify its revenue streams by offering access to 100% of currently available polymer applications

“Stereolithography (SLA) and Selective Laser Sintering (SLS) are the cornerstones of additive manufacturing of plastics, so I am honored and proud to be part of the team that is uniting the two companies that are taking both technologies to their full potential. Having worked side by side with the Nexa3D team over the past four years in Ventura, California, sharing facilities, exhibiting jointly at tradeshows, witnessing untold technological breakthroughs and rapid expansion, there is no doubt in my mind that this is the perfect match for both of our companies. I am excited to join this dream team and contribute towards the creation of a leading fourth generation additive manufacturing powerhouse,” said Tomasz Cieszynski, Co-Founder and CTO of NXT Factory.

Subject to customary and other deal-specific closing conditions being met, the transaction should be completed as soon as practically possible.

(Source/Images: Nexa3D)

The post Nexa3D Acquires NXT Factory, Introduces Eco-Friendly 3D Printing Washing Solvent appeared first on 3DPrint.com | The Voice of 3D Printing / Additive Manufacturing.

RENA Acquires HES Hirtisation Segment for Post-Processing for Metal 3D Printing

3D printing with metal gains yet another boost as RENA Technologies acquires the successful Hirtisation segment of Hirtenberger Engineered Services. With the goal of creating a new division for targeting the additive manufacturing sector, RENA announced that the existing HES team will be welcomed into the RENA corporate structure as they continue to serve the solar, semiconductor, and medical industries.

With this acquisition, RENA will have continued access not only to expertise but also progressive Hirtisation technology, offering high-performance tools in post-processing for 3D printed metal.

HES was founded in 2015 as it partnered with Happy Plating—a spinoff from an Austrian research center. Headquartered in Hirtenberg, Austria. HES is known as an exchange-to-exchange (E2E) technical provider specializing in the design and fabrication of functional metallic surfaces. Along with product offerings in coatings, nanowires, and sensors, it also manufactures precise, automated supply finishing modules. These are meant for the mass production of 3D printed metal parts for international customers in over 15 countries engaged in a variety of applications now relying on AM metal parts.

Hirtisation is suitable for all metals and alloys commonly used in 3D printing. A fully automatic finishing module for Hirtisated 3D-printed metal parts makes the process
highly efficient (Image and information from HES).

RENA, headquartered in Gütenbach, Germany, was founded in 1993, and also handles subsidiaries in Berg near Nürnberg and Freiburg im Breisgau. Known as a “wet processing company,” RENA systems are used to treat or customize surfaces, and this includes within the dental industry—an area that has become a focal point for manufacturers, with a wide range of projects emerging—from the use of complex 3D printed models for dental students to practice on to testing their accuracy, as well as forging ahead with new technology for 3D printing dental implants.

RENA’s interest grew in HES due to the experience level of its team, along with “efficient implementation of modern production machinery.” Its technology is expected to complement the RENA product line, to be expanded further at the new RENA Technologies Austria (RENA AT) hub for AM activities and all work related to electrochemical surface finishing.

“We are looking forward enthusiastically to working with our new colleagues at RENA because we can exploit RENA’s worldwide network as a launching pad for marketing our technology globally,” said Wolfgang Hansal, managing director of HES and designated managing director of the new RENA AT. “The first industrial machines have already been successfully introduced to the market. Together with RENA we can speed up establishment of our cutting-edge technology.”

While additive manufacturing continues to become a driving force in many applications today, functioning as a “building block of industrial production chains,” so does metal 3D printing and the associated and continually expanding study of materials and metal powders.

“With RENA Additive Manufacturing we can shape this process actively and gear up for growth,” said Michael Escher, managing director of the new RENA AT and Peter Schneidewind.

[Source: PresseBox]

The post RENA Acquires HES Hirtisation Segment for Post-Processing for Metal 3D Printing appeared first on 3DPrint.com | The Voice of 3D Printing / Additive Manufacturing.

Cold Metal Fusion: What is it?

In this post we will be looking at the Cold Metal Fusion (CMF) AM method, and we will be answering that exact question. What is it? The sinter-based technology was developed by Germany-based company Headmade Materials. This company was recently in the news because they completed a €1.9 million funding round thanks to Industrial Technologies […]

3D Systems announces strategic refocus and 20% staff cut following Q2 financial results

Jeffrey Graves, the new CEO of 3D printer manufacturer 3D Systems, outlined his strategic vision during this week’s announcement of financial results. In his first public outing as the firm’s CEO, Graves announced that the 3D Systems would be imminently restructured to focus on its healthcare and industrial verticals. Segments of the company’s business that […]

Swedish researchers successful in 4D printing micron-scale soft robots

A team of researchers from Linköping University, Sweden, has developed a set of microactuators for soft micro robotics using a custom-built extrusion-based 3D printer. The actuators contain an electrically-active polymer that changes shape – after being printed – in the presence of an electrical charge, granting them 4D capabilities. While 4D printed soft robots are […]

Kwikset Doorknob Lock Holder for Lockpicking #3DPrinting #3DThursday

Kwikset Doorknob Lock Holder for Lockpicking by Concorde Thingiverse

Concorde shared this project on Thingiverse!

I wanted to remove locks from some Kwikset door knobs to make it easier to hold them during picking practice and also to take less room in my bag. I found that the doorknob locks are a bit awkward to hold for lock picking practice on their own… I’d already made a holder for double-deadbolts, so I decided to adapt the idea to the doorknob lock since I couldn’t find anyone else that had done something similar for these knob locks. Kwikset doorknob locks are held in by spring clips rather than by screws, and this new holder take advantage of that and also has anti-rotation tabs to keep the lock itself positioned in the holder. When you first put your lock in the holder, just be sure that the pin section is upright between the anti-rotation tabs and that you’re starting the rear clips in the center of the hole that they snap into, and it will go right in.

Download files: https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:4395777


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Every Thursday is #3dthursday here at Adafruit! The DIY 3D printing community has passion and dedication for making solid objects from digital models. Recently, we have noticed electronics projects integrated with 3D printed enclosures, brackets, and sculptures, so each Thursday we celebrate and highlight these bold pioneers!

Have you considered building a 3D project around an Arduino or other microcontroller? How about printing a bracket to mount your Raspberry Pi to the back of your HD monitor? And don’t forget the countless LED projects that are possible when you are modeling your projects in 3D!

Raspberry Pi Zero Stand #3DThursday #3DPrinting

Raspberry Pi Zero Stand by hafenjunge Thingiverse

A nice take on a familiar design shared by hafenjunge on Thingiverse:

This is a remix of the Raspberry Pi Zero Stand from Adafruit. No screw required when you put the Raspberry Pi at the back and an hat to the front.

I made this because the Pimoroni enviro hat had wrong temperature reading because of the heat from Raspberry Pi. Now the stand acts as an divider between the two boards and the reading are almost perfect.

Download the files and learn more


649-1
Every Thursday is #3dthursday here at Adafruit! The DIY 3D printing community has passion and dedication for making solid objects from digital models. Recently, we have noticed electronics projects integrated with 3D printed enclosures, brackets, and sculptures, so each Thursday we celebrate and highlight these bold pioneers!

Have you considered building a 3D project around an Arduino or other microcontroller? How about printing a bracket to mount your Raspberry Pi to the back of your HD monitor? And don’t forget the countless LED projects that are possible when you are modeling your projects in 3D!