Raspberry Pi hexagon glow cube #piday #raspberrypi @Raspberry_Pi

F4c75e2b3c8ca58c7b13ed55f5d3975e preview featured

Shared by Smokyjoe on Thingiverse:

A lighted housing for your pi.

I used it to implement a game console with the Raspberry Pi.

The project cost me a lot of time.
Over and over again, I worked on it for several weeks.

I hope the instructions in the files is understandable.

Knowledge of the Raspberry Pi, Arduino and electrical implementations are beneficial.

Learn more!


3055 06Each Friday is PiDay here at Adafruit! Be sure to check out our posts, tutorials and new Raspberry Pi related products. Adafruit has the largest and best selection of Raspberry Pi accessories and all the code & tutorials to get you up and running in no time!

Arthritis Multi Tool #3DThursday

via hcps-wrenah on Thingiverse

This is a semester project for my High school engineering class, I designed a multi-tool for those with Arthritis can have an easier time getting ready in the morning.

There are button hooks on one side and zipper pulls on the other, with clamps in the middle.

See more!


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Every Thursday is #3dthursday here at Adafruit! The DIY 3D printing community has passion and dedication for making solid objects from digital models. Recently, we have noticed electronics projects integrated with 3D printed enclosures, brackets, and sculptures, so each Thursday we celebrate and highlight these bold pioneers!

Have you considered building a 3D project around an Arduino or other microcontroller? How about printing a bracket to mount your Raspberry Pi to the back of your HD monitor? And don’t forget the countless LED projects that are possible when you are modeling your projects in 3D!

The Adafruit Learning System has dozens of great tools to get you well on your way to creating incredible works of engineering, interactive art, and design with your 3D printer! If you’ve made a cool project that combines 3D printing and electronics, be sure to let us know, and we’ll feature it here!

T-Rex Skeleton with Fixed Files #3DThursday

via Han9988 on Thingiverse

I absolutly adore this model from MakerBot. Thank you MakerBot for sharing this model and I hope to see more in the future.
I liked the combined baseplate from icefox1983 which I used for my print and also added to the files.

In my experience well defined STL-files produce better print results. So I took the time to straighten up all files and saved them the way I was going to print them. My model in the pictures is not post-processed, just removed Brim.

See more!


649-1
Every Thursday is #3dthursday here at Adafruit! The DIY 3D printing community has passion and dedication for making solid objects from digital models. Recently, we have noticed electronics projects integrated with 3D printed enclosures, brackets, and sculptures, so each Thursday we celebrate and highlight these bold pioneers!

Have you considered building a 3D project around an Arduino or other microcontroller? How about printing a bracket to mount your Raspberry Pi to the back of your HD monitor? And don’t forget the countless LED projects that are possible when you are modeling your projects in 3D!

The Adafruit Learning System has dozens of great tools to get you well on your way to creating incredible works of engineering, interactive art, and design with your 3D printer! If you’ve made a cool project that combines 3D printing and electronics, be sure to let us know, and we’ll feature it here!

ZIL157 Cabin for WPL B16 #3DThursday #3DPrinting

9f6fdcae00acc6e45506173ddc3cdd37 preview featured

Shared by semeivan on Thingiverse:

The cab of the Soviet truck ZIL 157 in scale 1/16.

Thanks for the 3d model vonhellsing (https://www.thingiverse.com/vonhellsing/about)
I remade this model for 3d printing and installation on the frame WPL B16

Download the files and learn more


649-1
Every Thursday is #3dthursday here at Adafruit! The DIY 3D printing community has passion and dedication for making solid objects from digital models. Recently, we have noticed electronics projects integrated with 3D printed enclosures, brackets, and sculptures, so each Thursday we celebrate and highlight these bold pioneers!

Have you considered building a 3D project around an Arduino or other microcontroller? How about printing a bracket to mount your Raspberry Pi to the back of your HD monitor? And don’t forget the countless LED projects that are possible when you are modeling your projects in 3D!

Rapid 2019: Interview with John Dulchinos VP 3D Printing and Digital Manufacturing at Jabil

Jabil is a huge contract manufacturing firm that makes and develops products for the brands that you know. With over 100 factories and $22 billion in revenue and over a 200,000 employees Jabil’s interest in 3D printing can have huge ramifications for our industry. Just this one firm could broadly adopt our technology and drive adoption forward. With end-user products having to be made at high volume and low-cost Jabil is not the first firm you may think of when you look at 3D printing. After all, in highly customized industries and high-end applications such as satellites the 3D printing business case is more easily made. Jabil has been doing some fundamentally very interesting things, however. The firm has developed and is making materials which will lower its own costs, it went into the production of footwear and insoles, and set up a 3D printing network while deploying Ultimaker 3D printers and betting big on HP.

Jabil seems to be making a steadfast move in engaging the 3D printing market in a fundamental way. Moreover especially with a global network of manufacturing, a lot of volume, the expertise in making 3D printers itself and its own materials the firm may yet cement significant advantages into the fundamental economics of manufacturing and prototyping. With contract manufacturing being cutthroat and low margin anything that can give them an advantage may have significant knock-on effects. If it makes sense for an automotive manufacturer to adopt 3D printing then it will doubly so make sense for contractors in tight spots on tight deadlines to do so. This is especially true if they can accelerate prototyping, tooling or customization through 3D printing; offer more customized products at lower costs or bridge manufacture more efficiently. Any incremental move towards the ability to do mass customization at scale or to engage in profitable high mix low volume manufacturing could spell doom for competitors.

Heading up Jabil’s considerable 3D printing engagements and investments is VP John Dulchinos. 3DPrint.com spoke with him at RAPID to find out more.

HP printers at Jabil in Singapore

What is Jabil’s strategy in 3D printing?

Our mission is to accelerate the adoption of Additive Manufacturing. We are focused on how do we take an immature solution set and turn it into a manufacturing technology. We want to produce parts in a certified environment. We want to be able to stand behind the parts that we are making.

At the core, we want to make parts. That’s the foundation. This means that we need to engineer materials because there isn’t a good solution set in materials out there for us to use. In 3D printing, you can get any material as long as it is white PA 12 (polyamide). Usually, specific materials are available for specific solutions and in AM this has not been the case. This limitation meant that we had to develop and sell our own materials

What are you doing in AM? 

If we look at our clients, they are world-class companies. We work for companies such as HP and Cisco. Top brand companies. At a baseline level, we want to do programs with those companies. In order for us to do that we have to engineer the entire workflow. From the translation in the software to the design file, all of it.

We are interested in aerospace, automative, transportion in general, medical devices, orthopediccs and consumer goods.

Is this contract manufacturing of something else? 

Especially for consumer-facing products in things like mass customization application you really need the whole stack to make it make sense. We can do ideation and we can take something from an idea to a solution set.

For us, it is important to understand how and if additive creates value for customers. The more value that there is for them the more possible value there is for us as well.

What are some interesting applications? 

I’m an engineer. So I think of it in terms of a logic tree. For a lot of things, 3D printing doesn’t actually make sense. From a cost standpoint it does not map out well when compared to traditional manufacturing. In some low volume applications it makes sense especially in things such as aerospace and spare parts. In aerospace you can, for example, combine parts, save weight. This creates significant value. Late in life parts are also very expensive to keep and produce, here additive also is very usefull.  There are many great applications in healthcare as well.  Personalized medicine, but broader still also personalized products have much value. In performance, automotive people also want to pay for optimal parts. We can pay for outcomes in additive but that won’t work for all functional production parts. 

With Renault F1 now. we are their on demand production partner. We can now supply parts for on the F1 car. We love this since F1 is like we are very engineering driven. This partnership aligns well with us. It fits Jabil’s manufacturing pedigree. 

Are you expanding your materials and printers portfolio? 

We’ve made a number of materials and want to release a material a month soon. As for printers we operate close to 300 at the moment.

Is 3D printing helping Jabil? 

On the design side, for sure 3D printing is speeding up our business. With designs we can now make more iterations. With fixtures and tooling, we are also much faster. We have well documented case studies where we have gone from making a fixture in 4 to 5 weeks in five days. We can also do more quicker iterations in the fixture.

As an anecdotal piece of evidence, we had one fixture used to electrically test a part. It had a slot at the botton through which the operator had to put their hand. Every once in a while the operator’s fingers would slip and touch the circuit board, shorting it. Once this was discovered it took 3 hours to design and two hours to print a solution for this problem. Within five hours we had, thanks to 3D printing, addressed the quality issue. 

We also have some really good design for additive examples on recent client projects. In one example we took an existing assembly of 39 parts and reduced it to two. Reduction in assembly processes also happened as a result of this. We used 3D printing to simplify the part and the production process. 

Clamp Camera for Magic Arm #3DThursday

via cyberax on Thingiverse

j’utilise cette pince souvent et je la partage avec plaisirs elle et résistante 🙂

See more!


649-1
Every Thursday is #3dthursday here at Adafruit! The DIY 3D printing community has passion and dedication for making solid objects from digital models. Recently, we have noticed electronics projects integrated with 3D printed enclosures, brackets, and sculptures, so each Thursday we celebrate and highlight these bold pioneers!

Have you considered building a 3D project around an Arduino or other microcontroller? How about printing a bracket to mount your Raspberry Pi to the back of your HD monitor? And don’t forget the countless LED projects that are possible when you are modeling your projects in 3D!

The Adafruit Learning System has dozens of great tools to get you well on your way to creating incredible works of engineering, interactive art, and design with your 3D printer! If you’ve made a cool project that combines 3D printing and electronics, be sure to let us know, and we’ll feature it here!

3D Hangouts – PyBadge and 3D Scanning

Learn Guide:
https://learn.adafruit.com/adafruit-pybadge/

YouTube Video:
https://youtu.be/K2zu00C6lho

PyBadge
https://www.adafruit.com/product/4200

PyBadge LE
https://www.adafruit.com/product/3939

Heat-Set Tips
https://www.adafruit.com/product/4239

Mini Oval Speaker
https://www.adafruit.com/product/3923

400mah 3.7v Lipo Battery
https://www.adafruit.com/product/3898

Adafruit Lanyard
https://www.adafruit.com/product/3987

Flashforge Inventor II 3D Printer
https://www.adafruit.com/product/3897

Filament for 3D Printers
https://www.adafruit.com/product/2080

PyBadge 3D model!
https://blog.adafruit.com/2019/04/28/new-cad-model-pybadge-circuitpython-makecodearcade/

Timelapse Tuesday:

Geodesic Lamp Shade by Noe Ruiz @ecken
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PR1VPX4kCZE
https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:3389779

Filament for 3D Printers
https://www.adafruit.com/product/2080

Ultimaker 2+
https://www.adafruit.com/product/2673

Flashforge Inventor II
https://www.adafruit.com/product/3897

3D Parts Library on GitHub
https://github.com/adafruit/Adafruit_CAD_Parts

New Layer by Layer Mini Series: PyBadge Case
https://blog.adafruit.com/2019/05/19/new-layer-by-layer-pybadge-case/

5/20/19 community makes
https://www.thingiverse.com/make:659099 cpx snapfit case
https://www.thingiverse.com/make:658645 pi face case
https://www.thingiverse.com/make:657500 tesla charger wall hanger
https://www.thingiverse.com/make:657224 usb foot switch
https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:3634465 roller plate for v-slot

Rapid 2019: Interview With Christophe Paulo of DuPont “bulk of the Material Extrusion market will be in pellet to parts”

DowDuPont is one of the largest chemicals companies in the world. The firm entered the 3D printing market cautiously and later than most through a partnership with Taulman. Making far less waves than big splash BASF or accelerating Henkel and not having the decades of 3D printing experience of SABIC, DSM, Evonik or Arkema firm entered later than direct selling Solvay and Clariant. Whereas at other polymer and chemicals firms it increasingly seems that 3D printing is strategic, DuPont seems to be targeting practical material applications. No pie in the sky CEO pronouncements but rather functional materials. On the one hand the firm is making FDM filament in PA (polyamide) including insanely high GF load filaments they are also involved with ECCO’s efforts to 3D print silicone.

I’m fascinated to see polymer and chemicals giants engage 3D printing in a completely different way. It will take us years to see whose methods and engagements were the most apt and successful. Go indirect? Partner a lot? Build big departments or invest in existing firms? Focus on OEMs or services? I’m enjoying every minute of learning about all of these firms and their completely opposite learnings, assumptions and plans. Blind gorillas trying to horse ride is this epoch if we see it through the eyes of these polymer giants. They have the same information available to them and the same general ideas but they completely do it their own way.

Right now DuPont Transportation & Advanced Polymers of DowDuPont’s Specialty Products Division is focusing on automotive ducting, semi-crystalline materials and flexible materials. We interviewed Marketing Manager Christophe Paulo to find out more.

Christophe told 3DPrint.com that, “We are aiming to do is to make it simple for our customers to step into 3D printing.” The company is developing a number of different grades of materials. DuPont’s focus for the moment is on material extrusion technologies (FDM). Uniquely the firm not only is focusing on filament producers but it is also looking to sell granulate. Granulate, the pellets that are used to make filament and are used for injection molding is sold to filament makers. DuPont however really believes on selling granulate to OEMs and filament makers to be sold on to end users. The company is a huge fan of granulate 3D printers such as the Titan. 

Christophe explained that, “some of our materials $100 per kilo but pellets you’re looking at $25 per kilo” and that “you can print a lot of parts a lot faster and a lot cheaper with Titan3D or similar faster processes.” DuPont is specifically looking for larger parts here on production where they’re looking at “10,000 parts” or more. “If we start to do mass customization pellets make a lot of sense,” says Cristophe. 

Zytel automotive part

Pellet extruders have been around for a number of years. Technically not really perfected they’ve been a novelty. If Christophe is right and pellet extruders would make a big impact on the material extrusion market then this would mean a sea change for the 3D printing industry. Much material development, compounding, and production is being done by specialized filament companies such as Innofill3D, Mitsubishi, Colorfabb. A big switch to pellets would hit their margins very hard. This may also mean that distributors such as Resinex would be more inclined to sell direct to the market as well. Or more compounders could get involved in 3D printing. A lot of material extrusion innovation comes from filament companies. They are also the main center for knowledge exchange between end users, polymer companies and OEMs. Granulate would still have to be compounded and optimized for 3D printing through additives but the impact on the filament makers and 3D printing ecosystem would be huge. For their own materials, DuPont had to extensively, “work on the chemistry to make it printable.

So far the company sells both filament and pellets direct and through distributors. Along with Solvay, the firm is the only one to have a direct offering which is noteworthy. “We are nonexclusive so if a filament company wants to use our pellets we supply the material.” The company is “stepping into Nylon, TPE” and is looking at more materials. For now, they have Zytel with Carbon Fiber. This Polyamide 6/12 has a 20% Cabon Fiberfill. Polyamide with carbon fiber fill is a huge growth material for a lot of manufacturers since the stiffness and other properties are good. Christophe mentioned that “they also have grades of GF 30% and 50% GF.” These GF (glass filled) grades are similar to the materials used in automotive applications and familiar to companies in automotive. The team really worked hard to, ” make the material really easy to print and match properties with existing materials used by our customers.” They’re positioning their material as much cheaper than PEEK but above ABS in price. It sells for around 89 Euros for a Kilo. It may not have everything PEEK has but it’s at a price that makes sense to use in bulk, “the right price for the right properties.” 

If we look at the future Christophe firmly believes that, “the future of 3D printing is in series and mass customization.” He also, rather uniquely, thinks that “the bulk of the Material Extrusion market will be in pellet to parts” and mentions that, “We really believe in pellet printers.” This kind of strong opinion in favor of pellets is absent at the other big polymer companies and a very notable position to take. 

Next-Generation Oligomers for Formulating 3D Printing Inks & Resins

As more and more manufacturers look to replace traditional mass manufacturing processes with 3D printing, they are striving to create new, higher quality printing materials that overcome problems with deformation, have superior surface quality, and provide better mechanical properties.

From a commercial perspective, 3D printing is very appealing, especially in applications where only relatively small number of parts are required. Additionally, strong market demand for next-generation oligomers for formulating inks and resins used in SLA, DLP, and 3D inkjet printers has been coupled with an increased need for materials with a wide variety of physical properties. However, there are several challenges preventing the realization of this potential; speed of manufacturing and meeting material performance properties being the most important.

Background

Widely used as the backbone of UV-curable 3D-printing formulations for SLA, DLP, and 3D inkjetprinters, oligomers are combined with monomers, additives, and UV-reactive photoinitiators to produce UV-curable 3D-printing inks and resins. The formulation of these products requires a focus on bulk properties of the cured material such as tensile strength and elongation. Rigid printing materials are readily available, but offerings of tough, flexible products with high elongation and good impact resistance and rebound capability are more limited.  A selection of Bomar® oligomers from Dymax Oligomers & Coatings were designed with these 3D printing needs in mind, including toughness, low shrinkage, thermal stability, and low color.

This selection consists of next-generation oligomers with varying Tgs that allow for flexibility in mechanical properties. Formulators looking to eliminate object deformation can select an oligomer with a high Tg and low linear shrinkage. The oligomers also cover a large range of viscosities, so formulators can achieve the flow characteristics they desire. In addition to the mechanical properties these products provide, they also are non-yellowing for higher clarity and offer color stability for better looking objects. Formulations that utilize Bomar oligomers also gain high impact resistance, making them more durable against dropping and every day wear. Additionally, oligomers for thin film applications like coatings or inks may not necessarily have the same balance of properties that Bomar oligomers can provide.

Features & Benefits of Bomar® Oligomers

  • Excellent mechanical properties for products that can be used in applications beyond prototyping
  • Superior surface quality and deformation resistance for better aesthetics
  • High impact resistance for more durable products
  • Variety of viscosities for desired flow characteristics

Light-Curing Equipment for 3D Printing Post Cure and Rework

After a 3D model is built, it may be necessary to supply additional curing energy to the part to ensure that optimized material properties are achieved. Several Dymax curing system configurations are ideally suited for post-cure process or rework.

BlueWave® 200 3.0 UV-Curing Spot Lamp System
Ideal for Rework or Repair

The BlueWave® 200 3.0 is a high-intensity, light-curing spot lamp system that emits energy in the UVA and visible portion of the spectrum (300-450 nm) and is ideally suited for either manual or automated processes.

UV Light-Curing Flood Lamp Systems
Ideal for Post Cure

Dymax flood-lamp systems are designed for area curing or for curing multiple assemblies at once. These flo

od lamp modelsuse a powerful UV light-curing lamp (up to 225 mW/cm2) for fast curing over a 5″ x 5″ (12.7 cm x 12.7 cm) area. They can be used as stand-alone curing units or incorporated into conveyorized systems.

If you want to learn more about next-generation 3D printing oligomers, download our white paper New Developments in Acrylate Oligomers for 3D Printing.”

Link3D launches True Shape Nesting build simulation upgrade at Rapid + TCT

Link3D, a New York-based additive manufacturing workflow software company, has launched a new enhancement to its suite, True Shape Nesting, at RAPID + TCT. This feature enables Multi Jet Fusion and Selective Laser Sintering (SLS) technologies to find an optimal nesting strategy based on the shape of the 3D model. As such, manufacturers can utilize […]