CIPRES Introducing New Industrial Dyeing Machine for 3D Printed Parts at formnext

In 2004, coloring process service provider CIPRES Technology Systems was founded by Carlos Prestien; two short years later, the German company branched out and began offering serial production of SLS 3D printed components. Over the years, it’s continued developing color techniques, color units, and solutions for surface finishing. This summer, CIPRES GmbH was formed to take over the original company’s service sector, and also provides coloring and finishing machines for 3D printed components.

At formnext 2018, which opens tomorrow in Frankfurt, CIPRES will be presenting a new industrial dyeing machine: the eCOLOR Type 1/350/1 for 3D printed serial parts and components made out of polymer materials. The company partnered with Thies GmbH & Co. to produce the industrial machine, which was made specifically to treat 3D printed serial components, functional prototypes, and spare parts. The highly productive system offers excellent dyeing results and high reproducibility, in addition to a lower environmental impact and cost.

The new eCOLOR system, which can precisely adapt chemicals and dyes, can run at operating temperatures of up to 140 °C and at maximum 5bar operating pressure. With its user-friendly software and high-tech controller for monitoring each and every step of the process, the system offers what the company calls “perfect process reliability.” The software also helps users define and optimize jobs, according to their application-oriented or technical needs.

The eCOLOR Type 1/350/1 is designed to cover standard production capacities up to 37 liters, and has a packing diameter of 310 mm and packing height of 500 mm. It also has a flexible loading system for small (8 L), medium (19 L) or large (31 L) batch sizes, and all Thies machines comply with safety regulations and pressure vessel codes of various operating sites, such as ASME. In addition, the system’s frequency inverter driven pump allows for an accurate and economic adjustment of the liquor flow and the flow direction, which helps optimize each stage of the dyeing process.

In order to ensure it’s making the strongest products, CIPRES needs the strongest partners, like Thies, which originated in the traditional textiles area of Münsterland, Westphalia over 120 years ago. Together, the two companies are working to complete the product chain in terms of refining 3D printed nylon parts.

“The combination of our complementary expertise in colors, coloring and finishing solutions will open a new chapter in our common history,” CIPRES wrote in a press release. “We will entrance the excellences of this partnership to improve and expand your portfolio.”

In addition to Thies, CIPRES has several other strong partners, such as Additive Manufacturing Technologies (AMT). which offers automated post processing solutions with its complementary PostPro3D technology. CIPRES is also partnering with Swiss specialty chemicals company Archroma, which brings 130 years of color expertise with its soon-to-launch 3D Cosmic range for coloring 3D printed goods, and surface preparation and finishing leader Rösler Oberflächentecknik GmbH. We’re seeing a lot happening in post processing which should bode well for people wanting less expensive better looking 3D printed parts. If we as an industry want to produce high-quality consumer-friendly parts at volume then automation and automated post processing is what will get us there.

Visit CIPRES at formnext this week at booth G38 in Hall 3.1.

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[Images provided by CIPRES]

Russian Researchers Develop Neural Network for Metal 3D Printing

3D printing is not a simple process, particularly metal 3D printing. It involves a great deal of complex mathematical modeling, with calculations that can take weeks for even the most basic parts. But scientists from Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University have developed a neural network for metal 3D printing that is trained with a large number of parameters, which allows for the faster production of parts as well as the ability to use discovered dependencies to manufacture new parts.

Neural networks are computing systems used to process large data inputs. Researchers at the university used this method to obtain 3D printing process parameters and ensure the stability of the process.

“This was very important for us, since the metal transfer, which takes place in the course of printing parts from wire, is a very complex process characterized by competing physical effects; it has, however, a critical impact on the quality of the printed part,” said Oleg Panchenko, Head of the St. Petersburg Polytechnic University’s Laboratory of Light Materials and Structures SPbPU.

The network was developed in the Mathlab modeling environment, and all data was entered manually. A tool exists for the automatic acquisition of printing process parameters, but so far this data set is being processed online. Next, the researchers will develop an online system based on a neural network that will be learning continuously. The parameters will be added to the system automatically, while their tuning will take place in the course of printing. The researchers believe that the system will improve the quality of parts as well as increase the speed of developing process parameters for further manufacturing.

The neural network is already being used to assess the quality parameters of manufactured parts – for example, if the welding process is stable, if the metal is being melted and transferred correctly, etc. The scientists have also used the network to develop stable printing modes for manufacturing mastheads. They have applied for a patent for the new technology.

“We are the first to use neural networks in electric arc deposition,” Panchenko said.

He added that neural networks will soon find applications in additive manufacturing as well. The researchers believe that the use of similar approaches in the future will allow for the creation of fully automated self-learning systems able to continuously improve the quality of manufactured parts without human supervision.

The neural network developed by the Russian researchers is another step towards the overall automation of additive manufacturing, which has the potential to not only speed up the process and improve the quality of parts but to reduce the risk of human error, which is high when complex mathematics are involved. Metal additive manufacturing still suffers from a great deal of wasted time, money and material due to failed builds, but with advancements such as this one, those failures can potentially be greatly reduced in the future.

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[Source: Sputnik News/Images: SPBPU Media Center]

 

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Carbon Reduces Bulk Prices on 3D Printing Resins, Announces New and Expanded Partnerships

Last year, Carbon introduced a bulk discount program for its 3D printing resins, giving the manufacturing and 3D printing industries easier access to its now-famous CLIP technology. Today, the company announced that it is driving down prices on certain resins further. EPX 82 (epoxy), EPU 41 (elastomeric polyurethane) and RPU 70 (rigid polyurethane) will now be offered in bulk volumes of 50 or more liters at $50 per liter, fulfilling Carbon’s 2017 promise to eventually offer its resins at under $100 per liter. This is a smart move by the company. The total cost of leasing Carbon systems and the materials was cost prohibitive so far. By reducing resin prices it lowers the part cost and lets more business cases flourish. This more than the previous hype shows us that Carbon is serious about manufacturing.

“The global appetite for using digital manufacturing for high-volume production is rapidly growing, as more and more manufacturers are implementing these next-gen technologies into their processes and supply chains,” said Dr. Joseph DeSimone, CEO and Co-founder at Carbon. “Carbon has made digital manufacturing a reality, and the skyrocketing need for large-volume production enables us to introduce the most radical reduction of resin pricing ever. This move will also create new high-value applications and opportunities that were previously impossible, helping to transform the modest, estimated $10B 3D printing world into a multi-hundred-billion-dollar industry.”

Outside the US, EXP 82 and RPU 70 will be offered in 50 or more liters at  €45 per liter, £40 per liter, CAD $65 per liter and JP¥ 7,500 per
liter. EPU 41 is not currently available outside the United States.

Carbon also announced today that it has expanded its network of production partners with the addition of European service bureaus Complete Fabrications, Erpro GroupKurz, and Rapid Product Manufacturing (RPM). This brings Carbon’s production network to more than 35 companies across the world.

“Digital fabrication technology has evolved from the early days of conventional 3D printing of prototyping applications to full-scale digital manufacturing systems,” said Dana McCallum, Head of Production Partnerships at Carbon. “An important part of Carbon’s strategy is to empower manufacturers around the world with the many benefits of digital fabrication. By being part of the Carbon Production Network, our partners have a truly scalable, complete digital manufacturing platform that offers a faster process and creates high-quality, end-use parts with properties similar to injection molding.”

Carbon is also expanding on an already-existing partnership with Core3dcentres, a global company that offers digital dental production and design solutions. The two companies are expanding their partnership internationally, extending it to four different continents and allowing a broader range of dental labs access to Carbon’s technology.

Carbon and Core3dcentres 3D printed products will now be available to customers in Australia, Benelux Union (Belgium, the Netherlands, and Luxembourg), Canada, Croatia, Germany, Japan, Malaysia, New Zealand, Poland, Singapore, Spain, the UK and the United States. The two companies are capitalizing on the recent growth of 3D printing in the dental market, which, according to a report by SmarTech Publishing, grew by more than 35 percent for the second year in a row and will continue to accelerate in coming years.

“The dental industry’s use of additive manufacturing has skyrocketed over the last couple of years, but it wasn’t always like that. For some time, dental labs were plagued by 3D-printed parts that were inconsistent and poorly made with a limited range of materials, but that’s all changed with Carbon,” said Mark Maier, Managing Director of Global at Core3dcentres. “We’ve seen tremendous success deploying Carbon’s technology in the U.S. – high throughput, accuracy of prints using durable, high-quality materials, constant uptime, first-class education and customer support. We want to implement the same success in our dental labs around the world.”

Core3dcentres has made products such as surgical guides and dentures more affordable using 3D printing technology, and the partnership with Carbon has helped the company improve turnaround time as well as the diversity of its offerings.

“Core3d is at the forefront of innovation in digital dentistry, and Carbon is thrilled to expand our partnership in support of our shared global vision and commitment to the continuing development and enhancement of the digital ecosystem,” said Brian Ganey, General Manager of Carbon’s Dental Business. “The age of digital 3D Manufacturing is here, and Carbon is redefining what’s possible with a complete dental solution that delivers on the promise of digital fabrication for production at scale.”

Carbon will be present at formnext, which is taking place in Frankfurt, Germany this week from November 13th to 16th. If you’ll be attending, stop by and visit Carbon in Booth B30, Hall 3.0.

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