Raspberry Pi Retro Computer #piday #raspberrypi #3DPrinting @Raspberry_Pi

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Perfect retro inspired, 3D printed, Raspberry Pi computer; complete with a floppy disk drive! The maker even created a nice retro magazine cover. Shared by LowBudgetTech on Thingiverse:

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Hello everyone! I have searched over the years for a full sized retro computer that you can print. Since I couldn’t find one, I decided to make my own and share it!

The most important part of making this feel like a retro computer is the keyboard. To get that retro clunky fallout terminal like sound, I opted for a mechanical keyboard with blue switches. These days they are pretty inexpensive and available on Amazon.

The monitor was the hardest part to find since most of the smaller monitors are either too expensive or too thick. After searching for awhile for the perfect size, I finally found it on Amazon for a reasonable price. To make assembly easy, I decided not to take the monitor apart and have it be able to fit in the 3D build right out of the box.

The floppy drive was the easiest to find. There are lots of external USB floppy drives that are cheap and work well with the Raspberry Pi.

And for the actual computing part I used a Raspberry Pi model 3 B+!

This Callisto J-29 Terminal works well as a dedicated raspberry pi personal computer.

See more!


3055 06Each Friday is PiDay here at Adafruit! Be sure to check out our posts, tutorials and new Raspberry Pi related products. Adafruit has the largest and best selection of Raspberry Pi accessories and all the code & tutorials to get you up and running in no time!

GE Additive to Lead GA-ASI in Accelerating Industrial Growth with Additive Manufacturing

Another dynamic collaboration is in the works as General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc. has selected GE Additive as a consultant in their latest mission for accelerating and strengthening their metal 3D printing and additive manufacturing processes.

GE’s consultancy division, AddWorksTM will be teaming up with GA-ASI as they begin reaping all the benefits of 3D printing with metal to include the ability to make extremely strong, powerful, reliable parts that may not have been possible previously.

“This is a great fit for us, because GE has already been through a similar journey. We get where GA-ASI is at and where it wants to go. By offering our learnings and in-depth knowledge of the aerospace and defense industry, we will be able to assist them in leveraging metal additive with our methodical, systematic approach, that meets the exacting requirements of the sector and their aggressive goal to grow the impact of additive within their application space,” said Jason Oliver, President & CEO, GE Additive.

GE Additive AddWorks is comprised of over 200 team members specializing in engineering and manufacturing. As consultants to GA-ASI, they will use their knowledge in AM processes, advising the Poway, California-headquartered company in:

  • How to introduce AM into their business overall
  • Related industrialization issues
  • Part certification processes
  • Materials characterization
  • Production readiness strategies

“Some of our AddWorks consultants are responsible for designing and then industrializing many of the additively manufactured aerospace parts that are in service today. So, they are very well-placed to accompany GA-ASI in accelerating their additive journey. We’re honored to secure this engagement and look forward to helping them drive successful outcomes and their competitive advantage,” he added.

Many other industry leaders are making similar forays into both investing and committing to progressive new ways of manufacturing such as AM. Although there may be a significant initial investment for large companies engaged in industrial manufacturing, actual parts usually cost exponentially less, and can be both designed and produced on demand in low-batch volume.

While larger companies such as GE and GA-ASI may already have firm control in-house for research and development, design, and production, AM processes at the ready mean that engineers can use scanning technology to replace parts that may have become difficult to procure or are actually obsolete and impossible to find. Changes can be made quickly, and new iterations can be fabricated and tested immediately, meaning there is little interruption to workflow—whether products may be created for maintenance and replacement or are completely new innovations.

While GE is known for their own additive manufacturing facilities and innovations, GE Additive has been behind many exciting projects where they offer their expertise to other industry leaders and researchers, to include working with University of Sydney in metal 3D printing, Vera in securing 3D printing workflow, and partnering with automotive leaders like Honda.

What do you think of this news? Let us know your thoughts; join the discussion of this and other 3D printing topics at 3DPrintBoard.com.

[Source/ Images: GE Additive]

3DPod: 3D Printing Podcast Episode 3: Teaching in 3D

On this episode of the 3DPod we are discussing 3D printing in education. Presented by many as a great idea your two presenters are not so sure. Max certainly is against 3D printers in elementary scools. How about high school and college? What do we think of how 3D printers can help students today? Listen to the podcast below.

Our previous podcast on the Fourth Industrial Revolution is here while our podcast on 3D Printing Beyond PLA is here.

 

Joris Peels is the Netherlands-based Editor in Chief of 3DPrint.com, the #1 source for 3D printing news and industry resources.  Joris has more than a decade’s experience working for 3D printing companies including Shapeways, Materialise, Formlabs, Ultimaker, MakePrintable, Hewlett Packard. Joris lives, eats, sleeps and dreams 3D printing and tries to give a dose of realism and truth to the hype surrounding 3D printing.
Maxwell Bogue is Co-Founder and Inventor of the 3Doodler, the world’s first 3D printing pen and one of the most successful Kickstarter projects of all-time.  Once described by the Huffington Post as “the happiest man at CES” Maxwell has been invited to keynote and speak at events worldwide including LeWeb, Tech+ and CE Week, both on the 3D printing industry and getting companies off the ground.

Mimaki and Sindoh release 3DFF-222, a desktop FDM/FFF 3D printer

Mimaki, a Japanese digital printing specialist has released a desktop FDM/FFF printer, co-branded with the South Korean 3D printer manufacturer, Sindoh. Hybrid Services, a UK reseller of Mimaki will showcase the 3DFF-222 printer at Sign and Digital 2019 (2-4 April), a signage and digital print exhibition in Birmingham. Chief Operations Manager at Hybrid Services, Brett Newman, said, […]

University of Missouri: Thesis Student 3D Prints Collagen to Create Tissue Engineering Scaffolds

University of Missouri thesis student, Christopher John Glover, explores the use of 3D printed structures in bioprinting, outlining his findings further in ‘In Situ Polymerizing Collagen for the Development of 3D Printed Tissue Engineering Scaffolds.’ Extolling the virtues of collagen while also discussing challenges in using it, Glover explains that this natural material has been a favorite in tissue engineering, demonstrating excellent protein structures for ventures in the lab.

“Nearly all tissues in the human body contain collagen including skin, muscle, nerves, vasculature, tendons, ligaments, and even bone. Skin, for example, is 80% collagen by mass. Due to this abundance, collagen is extremely biocompatible and versatile,” states Glover. “With the proper mechanical and chemical stimuli, stem cells seeded on collagen scaffolds have the potential to differentiate down a myriad of cell lineages and become nearly any tissue in the human body.”

There can be difficulty in using collagen for some types of tissue regeneration though, and other disadvantages such as the amount of time it takes to progress from a gelatinous state to a solid.

For this project, Glover studied the manufacturing of 3D collagen-based scaffolds which he enhanced with a variety of anti-inflammatory agents such as gold nanoparticles and curcumin. Specifically, he used in situ polymerizing collagen (IPC), a unique material derived from Type 1 porcine collagen. In experimenting, he performed different post printing treatments on the test groups. Some were just left in their basic 3D printed state, which others were crosslinked without AuNP or curcumin or with either 1X or 2X AuNP or curcumin. Characterization was performed in evaluating stability of each scaffold and then noting its viability, along with which types of treatment were most successful.

Tasks for ascertaining viability were as follows:

  • To 3D print uniform and reproducible collagen-based scaffolds
  • To examine the thermal properties of the crosslinked scaffolds
  • To verify and quantify the presence of gold nanoparticles in the crosslinked scaffolds
  • To evaluate the cytotoxicity and anti-inflammatory capabilities of the gold nanoparticle and curcumin scaffolds

The six experimental groups were:

  • Uncrosslinked
  • Crosslinked
  • AuNP
  • Curcumin
  • 2X AuNP
  • 2X curcumin

“The uncrosslinked group exists to examine the effects of crosslinking alone; the AuNP and curcumin groups exist to determine the effects of each bioactive agent; the 2X AuNP and 2X curcumin groups exist to exacerbate those effects, for better or for worse,” stated Glover.

Glover customized his own 3D printer, assembled from a CNC milling machine, with translational stages manipulated by three stepper motors. Mach3 Mill software was used in design and editing. The two most common 3D prints made during the study were a grid pattern and circles used for cell assays. Glover found that resolution was not optimum with his hardware but thought it could be finer on a higher-performance printer.

The 3D printer features a 3D printed holster to house the syringe pump and is seen here printing a circular grid pattern

The Mach3 Mill software interface features many functions not utilized in
our 3D printing process, such as the tool information and spindle speed boxes.

Crosslinking with EDC or genipin proved to enhance both stability and durability of the 3D printed scaffolds.

“By comparing the application of EDC crosslinking during printing versus post printing, it was found that crosslinking post printing yielded significantly greater stabilities than crosslinking during printing,” stated the researchers.

The collagen-based scaffolds crosslinked with EDC exhibited ‘superb cell viability,’ although Glover pointed out that gold nanoparticles seemed to decrease success in viability somewhat. Genipin also decreased viability, which plummeted further with the addition of curcumin.

“As previously stated, collagen alone is a fragile material and even after crosslinking can deteriorate if over-handled. If this platform is to be utilized to produce implantable scaffolds, the durability of the collagen would need to be markedly improved. This could be accomplished by printing the IPC along with another material or by further post-print manipulation of the collagen other than simply crosslinking,” concluded Glover, who goes on to state that printer resolution would need to be improved, along with enhancing of the anti-inflammatory capabilities of the printed products.

3D printing with collagen has been of great interest to researchers lately, including uses in artistic masks, bioink, and skin grafts. Read more about collagen in tissue engineering here. What do you think of this news? Let us know your thoughts! Join the discussion of this and other 3D printing topics at 3DPrintBoard.com.

[Source / Images: In Situ Polymerizing Collagen for the Development of 3D Printed Tissue Engineering Scaffolds]

UK Researchers Customize Resins for SLA 3D Printing of Continuous Flow Microreactors

Solar energy is by far the largest resource, amongst renewable energy sources, providing our planet with more energy in one hour than all of the energy consumed by humans in an entire year.” [1]

3D printing and energy combined create a lot of excitement in the research realm, with obvious and vast potential to be tapped—all at a fingertip’s reach within the lab. In ‘Additive manufacturing of photoactive polymers for visible light harvesting,’ authors Adilet Zhakeyev, John Tobin, Huizhi Wang, Filipe Vilela, and Jin Xuan delve further into the possibilities, 3D printing photosensitizing structures for singlet oxygen generation.

In their recent work, the authors developed customized photoactive resins for SLA 3D printing of continuous flow reactors—made from photoactive polymers. They were able to demonstrate how the addition of a photoactive monomer in SLA resin can allow for more advanced 3D printing, resulting in reactors for generation under visible light irradiation.

As the team of researchers point out, being able to use solar light in chemical synthesis is a common goal among scientists.

“In recent years, it was demonstrated that conjugated porous polymers (CMPs) are well suited for light (solar energy) harvesting applications, such as photogeneration of singlet oxygen,” state the researchers. “By incorporating a photoactive material into a polymer backbone, self-quenching effect can be potentially mitigated due to reduction of the concentration of photoactive material (when compared to the CMPs).”

With the use of continuous flow microreactors, challenges in batch photochemistry can be overcome, with 3D printing presenting itself at the perfect time for eclipsing more conventional methods that are holding science back currently, including:

  • Soft lithography
  • Injection molding
  • Etching (glass and silicon)
  • Hot embossing

Traditional techniques are more limited, require more labor on the part of the user, and are more time consuming and expensive. As further research evolves in microfluidic applications, SLA has proven itself ‘promising,’ especially because it allows scientists to make complex geometries with freedom not only in design but production too.

As is common in 3D printing, however, the materials for specific projects are not yet always available. Because of this, materials science is expanding significantly as manufacturers and scientists create new materials and methods. Currently, there are just a small number of polymers available in commercial SLA materials.

“It was reported that the use of light absorbers, tailored to the light source of a SLA printer, can result in improvements in resolution of the prints and allow flow channel miniaturization, without the need for any changes in hardware, making it useful for microfluidic device fabrication,” say the authors.

CMPS can be used to improve resolution, as well as adding photocatalytic functionality, say the researchers, who focused on creating bespoke photoactive resins for expanding the use of SLA 3D printing further. They used a Form 1+ SLA 3D printer, testing the prepared 0.5 wt% St-BTZ resin and printed samples created with a layer thickness of 25 μm. They also customized the Form 1+ so that the resin tank’s tilting motion and build platform were removed. The CAD file (Creo Parametric 3.0) was created with 25 panels, ranging from 50 to 1250 microns.

“This work provided an insight into how development of bespoke photoactive resins can enable the application of SLA in fabrication of continuous flow photoreactors, where a photo-active unit is directly incorporated within the polymer matrix,” concluded the researchers. “St-BTZ was successfully incorporated into a commercially available SLA resin, which was subsequently used to fabricate a 3D photosensitizing continuous flow reactor prototype for singlet oxygen generation.”

“Results indicate that even with a small concentration of St-BTZ (0.5  wt%),  SLA  fabricated  small  scale  (0.1  ml)  photoactive  continuous  flow  reactor  shows  activity  in  photosensitization  of  singlet  oxygen  synthesis  under  visible  light irradiation (420 nm). 5.7% conversion of 2-furoic acid to 5-hydroxy-2(5H)-furanone via the photosensitization of singlet oxygen was achieved after 5 hours cycling of reaction solution.  Future work will involve design and fabrication of larger volume photoreactors with intricate flow features and development of SLA resins to produce organic solvent resistant structures.”

a) working curve displaying measured panel thicknesses for a given energy exposure dose for curing Formlabs Clear resin with and without St-BTZ; b) liquid state UV/vis absorption spectra of Formlabs Clear resin with and without St-BTZ.

You may be surprised to find out how integrated 3D printing has become in areas like energy and chemistry, with researchers making use of the technology for affordable flow systems, oscillatory baffled reactors, and 3D fluidic devices. Find out more now about customized photoactive polymers here. What do you think of this news? Let us know your thoughts! Join the discussion of this and other 3D printing topics at 3DPrintBoard.com.

solid state UVvis absorption spectra of 3D printed films with and without St-BTZ; b) SEM image of a 3D printed sample containing 0.5 wt% St-BTZ.

a) CAD image of 0.1 ml photoreactor; b) image of a 3D printed 0.5 wt% St-BTZ 0.1 ml photoreactor; c) 1-NMR spectra of the mixture of 2-furoic acid irradiated at 420 nm with cycling for 5 hours (NMR conversion: ~ 5%) in D2O, peaks at 7.73, 7.31, 6.63 ppm attributed to 2-furoic acid, 7.48, 6.32 ppm attributed to the 5-hydroxy-2(5H)-furanone.

[Source / Images: Additive manufacturing of photoactive polymers for visible light harvesting]

ZELDA BOTW Stamina Vessel #3DThursday #3DPrinting #BreathoftheWild

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Shared by Extruded on Thingiverse:

ZELDA BOTW STAMINA VESSEL

I really wanted a glow in dark stamina vessel from Breath of the Wild and this is what I came up with. The prototype I first made did not quite fit well together with the cage all I had was small holes for dowels which kept on snapping. So I tried making clips several different ways before settling on the current design.

Download the files and learn more


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Every Thursday is #3dthursday here at Adafruit! The DIY 3D printing community has passion and dedication for making solid objects from digital models. Recently, we have noticed electronics projects integrated with 3D printed enclosures, brackets, and sculptures, so each Thursday we celebrate and highlight these bold pioneers!

Have you considered building a 3D project around an Arduino or other microcontroller? How about printing a bracket to mount your Raspberry Pi to the back of your HD monitor? And don’t forget the countless LED projects that are possible when you are modeling your projects in 3D!

High Detailed Moon Lamp #3DThursday #3DPrinting

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Shared by moononournation on Thingiverse:

This is a high detail moon lamp model. It have bump map details and color map visual details at the surface. At the same time the shell thickness can project the color map grayscale visual when a light source come from inside.

Please find more detail at Instructables:
https://www.instructables.com/id/High-Detailed-Moon-Lamp/

Download the files and learn more


649-1
Every Thursday is #3dthursday here at Adafruit! The DIY 3D printing community has passion and dedication for making solid objects from digital models. Recently, we have noticed electronics projects integrated with 3D printed enclosures, brackets, and sculptures, so each Thursday we celebrate and highlight these bold pioneers!

Have you considered building a 3D project around an Arduino or other microcontroller? How about printing a bracket to mount your Raspberry Pi to the back of your HD monitor? And don’t forget the countless LED projects that are possible when you are modeling your projects in 3D!

Retro Style Solder Fume Extractor #3DThursday #3DPrinting

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Shared by calebbrewar on Thingiverse:

I needed to practice with Autodesk Inventor, so I designed this. It uses a 90mm (120mm diagonal from screw hole to screw hole) (25mm thick) fan. I used a 11.5 x 19mm switch. For the power connector, I just cut the barrel jack off a cord I didn’t need. The filter is a 10mm thick carbon filter.

In this model I have added some features to the front to hold the bottom of the filter in place. They should print okay, but I have tested it. For the first one I did, I just used hot glue. I had issues with the fan screw holes lining up, and had to drill them out some. I believe I have now fixed that in this model.

Download the files and learn more


649-1
Every Thursday is #3dthursday here at Adafruit! The DIY 3D printing community has passion and dedication for making solid objects from digital models. Recently, we have noticed electronics projects integrated with 3D printed enclosures, brackets, and sculptures, so each Thursday we celebrate and highlight these bold pioneers!

Have you considered building a 3D project around an Arduino or other microcontroller? How about printing a bracket to mount your Raspberry Pi to the back of your HD monitor? And don’t forget the countless LED projects that are possible when you are modeling your projects in 3D!