3D Printing News Briefs: November 13, 2018

We should really call today’s 3D Printing News Briefs the formnext 2018 Briefs, as announcements from the show are numerous this week. EnvisionTEC, XYZprinting, BASF, and DSM all introduced new 3D printing materials at the event in Frankfurt today, and in the only news not related to formnext, Imerys Ceramics has announced a new range of ceramic feedstocks.

EnvisionTEC Debuting First 4K 3D Printing System

At formnext, 3D printer manufacturer EnvisionTEC debuted the industry’s first DLP-based 3D printer that uses a true 4K projector with UV optics tuned to the 385 nm wavelength. Available in three production-ready variations, with a gray body and a 2560 x 1600 pixel projector resolution, the Perfactory P4K 3D printer delivers highly accurate parts with an ultra-smooth surface finish. Additionally, the Perfactory P4K, has access to the rest of the Perfactory line’s versatile materials portfolio for production capacity.

“The P4K is the highest resolution advanced DLP printer with the largest build envelope and deploys artificial intelligence in pixel modulation to deliver the highest accuracy parts with the smoothest available surface finish in the 3D printing space. This will deliver the next level of production-grade 3D printing solutions,” said Al Siblani, the CEO of EnvisionTEC.

The new Perfactory P4K will be on display at formnext all week.

XYZprinting Introducing New 3D Printing Materials

Another company introducing new materials at formnext this week is desktop 3D printing brand XYZprinting. In order to expand the capabilities of both domestic and professional grade 3D printers, the company is launching a new antibacterial PLA material, along with copper metallic PLA and Carbon PLA materials. The first of these can destroy up to 99% of bacteria, including E. coli and Staphylococcus aureus, and comes in four colors: white, red, yellow and neon green.

The copper metallic PLA, made of 65% copper powder, is a good alternative for hobbyists when it comes to sculpting metal for ornamental models. The material is being launched in conjunction with XYZprinting’s new nozzle, made of carbon hardened steel. Finally, the new Carbon PLA, which is also compatible with this new nozzle, is made of 10% carbon fiber, and its matte finish is ideal for showing off fine details. You can learn more about these new materials at XYZprinting’s booth D10 in Hall 3.1, where it will also be exhibiting its latest 3D printer, the da Vinci Color AiO, with a 3D scanner and optional laser engraver.

BASF 3D Printing Solutions Presents New Products at formnext

Germany-based BASF 3D Printing Solutions GmbH (B3DPS), a 100% subsidiary of BASF New Business GmbH, is also at formnext this week, to introduce several new materials for photopolymer and laser sintering methods, in addition to announcing some new partnerships and alliances. First, B3DPS is introducing flame-resistant Ultrasint Polyamide PA6 Black FR, Ultrasint PA6 Black LM X085, which is suitable for most current SLS 3D printers, and Ultrasint PP, a polypropylene with great plasticity, low moisture uptake, and resistance to liquids and gases. Additionally, B3DPS has also grouped its photopolymer materials under the new Ultracur3D brand name.

András Marton, Senior Business Development Manager at B3DPS, said, “Our Ultracur3D portfolio enables us to offer customers various UV-curable materials for 3D printing that provide far better mechanical properties and higher long-term stability than most available materials.

“These materials have been developed for functional components that are subject to high stress.”

The subsidiary also announced that it’s partnering with California company Origin and 3D printer manufacturer Photocentric to develop photopolymers and photopolymer 3D printing processes, and working with Chinese 3D printer manufacturer Xunshi Technology, which operates in the US under the name SprintRay, to open up new applications for the Ultracur3D range. Additionally, B3DPS subsidiary Innofil3D is partnering with Jet-Mate Technology in China and US-based M. Holland to distribute plastic filaments. Visit B3DPS at formnext this week at booth F20 in Hall 3.1.

DSM Announces 3D Printing Product Launches

Vent cover used for PIV windtunnel testing, printed in Somos PerFORM Reflect

In today’s final formnext news, science-based company DSM has unveiled two new high-performance materials for 3D printing structural parts. Somos PerFORM Reflect is a groundbreaking new stereolithography material for wind tunnel testing with PIV (Particle Imaging Velocimetry), and saves more than 30% post treatment cost by eliminating the need to apply PIV coatings to printed parts. In addition to helping customers conduct iterations and collect data more quickly, the resin could actually help break speed records for wind tunnel testing.

“Speed is crucial, whether in automotive, aerospace or other transportation design. Eliminating the need to apply PIV coatings is a major breakthrough for customers who are using PIV wind tunnel testing. It allows them to speed up their aerodynamic design optimizations. We are thrilled that our strategy of focusing on helping customers create their applications have enabled us to deliver such tremendous value. Overnight, Somos® PerFORM Reflect will not just set new speed records but new industry standards,” said Hugo da Silva, Vice President of Additive Manufacturing at DSM.

The company’s second new material is the thermoplastic copolyester (TPC) Arnitel ID2060 HT, which is perfect for the FDM 3D printing of structural parts for automotive applications. The material features a balance of prolonged high temperature resistance, flexibility, and chemical resistance against exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) condensate.

Imerys Ceramics Introduces EZ Print 3D Range of Ceramic Feedstocks

As part of the Imerys group, Imerys Ceramics designs, produces, and markets high-performance mineral solutions for the ceramic industries, and is making ceramic 3D printing easy with its new, unique range of ceramic materials called EZ Print 3D.

EZ Print 3D is available as a plug & play cartridge, so users can enjoy efficiency and ease of use when it comes to 3D printing. The materials are also available as a “ready to fill” ceramic feedstock, and have been tested on several 3D printers currently on the market. EZ Print 3D has a low firing temperature of 1220°C that’s compatible with most kiln temperature limits, and the genuine low porosity (<0,5%) of a porcelain. The technology is perfect for tableware and giftware applications, and the company plans to expand EZ Print 3D accordingly as 3D printing adoption grows. Imerys Ceramics also provides technical support and a dedicated team that’s competent in 3D printing to help customers.

Discuss these stories and other 3D printing topics at 3DPrintBoard.com or share your thoughts in the Facebook comments below.

AM-Flow Offers Automated Solution for Sorting 3D Printed Parts

At formnext this week, Dutch company AM-Flow is introducing its new Vision Robot, a tool that automatically removes and sorts 3D printed parts. Automation is becoming more and more of a part of additive manufacturing, but where it often stops short, the company points out, is when the 3D printing process starts. Humans are still commonly required for removing parts from machines and sorting them, which results in extra work, time, cost and sometimes human error. The Vision Robot removes humans from the equation, by automatically sorting parts.

According to AM-Flow, the robot requires only one operator to perform the amount of work that eight people would be needed to do normally. The Vision Robot can identify and sort anywhere from 200 to 10,000 parts per day, cutting labor costs by 80 percent. It’s highly accurate, with 95 percent correctness the first time in number one recommendations, and 100 percent correctness in its top three recommendations. It has shown close to zero false positives.

The Vision Robot works in three modes: manual, continuous and semi-continuous. It can be custom-made depending on the type of 3D printer farm it’s being used with, and it is built from industrial-grade components. It seamlessly integrates with other AM-Flow modules, and features a user-friendly touch screen operator console.

Part recognition takes less than one second per part, resulting in up to 1,200 parts identified per hour. The return on investment is instant, says AM-Flow, as soon as the automation results in one fewer hire for post-processing alone. It enables both high mix and high volume, says Stefan Rink, CEO of AM-Flow.

“This is the golden key unlocking industrialization and true end-to-end digital manufacturing in 3D-printing environments,” he adds.

Customers have several options, including buying the Vision Robot outright, leasing it, or a pay per part program.

AM-Flow’s goal is to accelerate the industrialization of additive manufacturing, and it offers several other modules, including:

  • AM-Expert
  • AM-Logic
  • AM-Sort
  • AM-Route
  • AM-Package

With these products, AM-Flow is striving to automate as much of the additive manufacturing process as possible. The company isn’t the first to develop a system for automating the picking and sorting of 3D printed parts; Voodoo Manufacturing is also working on a complete lights-out factory solution for 3D printing, and other companies are also taking steps to simplify and automate certain areas of post-processing. One concern may be that solutions like this could cost jobs, and that can’t be ignored, but automation isn’t always a matter of eliminating jobs so much that it is freeing up workers to spend more time on the more technical requirements of 3D design, for example. AM-Flow wants to eliminate menial labor, essentially, with its robotic products.

Formnext is taking place in Frankfurt, Germany from now until November 16th. You can visit AM-Flow at Booth H17 in Hall 3.1.

Discuss this and other 3D printing topics at 3DPrintBoard.com or share your thoughts below.

 

3D Printing Industry Rave Til AM 2018 with DyeMansion, 3YOURMIND, AM Ventures, TÜV SÜD

For the second year in a row, 3D Printing Industry has been proud to co-host an official Formnext afterparty in collaboration with organizers DyeMansion, 3YOURMIND, AM Ventures and TÜV SÜD. Building on the momentum of last year, 2018’s Rave Til AM drew on the growing number of Formnext exhibitors to celebrate opening night of Europe’s largest 3D printing focused […]

New Tutorial! Cutting Corners in @adskFusion360 #LayerByLayer

In this tutorial I walk through cutting corners on a box using two different methods. I got inspired by the design of the control box on the Prusa i3 MK 2 3D printer and though it’d be interesting to apply this to an upcoming project.

3D Printing Projects Playlist:
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLjF7R1fz_OOWD2dJNRIN46uhMCWvNOlbG

3D Hangout Show Playlist:
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLjF7R1fz_OOVgpmWevin2slopw_A3-A8Y

Layer by Layer CAD Tutorials Playlist:
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLjF7R1fz_OOVsMp6nKnpjsXSQ45nxfORb

Timelapse Tuesday Playlist:
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLjF7R1fz_OOVagy3CktXsAAs4b153xpp_


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Every Thursday is #3dthursday here at Adafruit! The DIY 3D printing community has passion and dedication for making solid objects from digital models. Recently, we have noticed electronics projects integrated with 3D printed enclosures, brackets, and sculptures, so each Thursday we celebrate and highlight these bold pioneers!

Have you considered building a 3D project around an Arduino or other microcontroller? How about printing a bracket to mount your Raspberry Pi to the back of your HD monitor? And don’t forget the countless LED projects that are possible when you are modeling your projects in 3D!

The Adafruit Learning System has dozens of great tools to get you well on your way to creating incredible works of engineering, interactive art, and design with your 3D printer! If you’ve made a cool project that combines 3D printing and electronics, be sure to let us know, and we’ll feature it here!

GE Additive Announced that Concept Laser’s M LINE Factory 3D Printing System Will Be Delivered in Q2 2019

A little over two years ago, GE acquired a 75% stake in metal 3D printing leader Concept Laser. Ever since then, GE Additive has been working to review and redesign the system, software, and design architecture of Concept Laser’s M LINE FACTORY 3D printer so that it’s in line with established GE processes. The modular system has also been undergoing beta testing with some selected customers. But today at formnext in Frankfurt, GE Additive announced that its first Concept Laser M LINE FACTORY systems will finally be delivered to customers in Q2 of 2019.

The M LINE Factory provides excellent reliability and automation, which in turn drives scalable, economical series production on an industrial scale – something that most current standalone machine solutions cannot achieve. As the technology continues its transition from prototyping to production, the demand for quality 3D printers, along with operators to run them and floor space to house them, is rising.

“The positive impact the M LINE FACTORY can have on our customers’ operations and their bottom line is huge,” said Jason Oliver, the President and CEO of GE Additive. “It’s important we provide technologically advanced systems that are reliable and add value to our customers. M LINE FACTORY delivers on those commitments.”

The system is an important part of GE Additive’s focus on providing reliable, repeatable 3D printers that are ready for series production. The M LINE FACTORY has a maximum build envelope of  500 x 500 x up to 400 mm³ (x,y,z), and is optionally equipped with one to four laser sources, each one delivering 1,000 W of power.

During the last two years of lifetime and rig testing, the company identified several areas for improvement that have since been incorporated, such as the onboard software system, which offers real-time, in-situ process monitoring, modularized architecture, and superior exposure strategies. The 3D printer’s automation and in-machine architecture have been improved, and its ease of service, scalable modular system design, serviceability, process control, and thermal stability have all been enhanced.

The set-up and dismantling processes, along with part production, actually occur in two independent machine units, which can either be combined or operated separately from one another, according to the customer’s preference. This makes it possible to run production processes in parallel, instead of sequentially, which increases the output quantity and availability of the process chain and lowers downtime.

The M LINE Factory LPS, which stands for Laser Processing System, increases the laser ‘on’ time by separating the pre/post processing unit from the individual work process, while at the same time maintaining an integrated machine design. Instead of forming a single continuous unit, the LPS is made up of an independent powder module, build module, and overflow module, which are of a uniform size and can each be activated individually now for the first time. An easy to use internal transport system is used to automatically transport the modules, and to maximize the efficiency of the system’s footprint, the modules can be stacked up in a series alignment as well.

Additional features of the M LINE Factory LPS include:

  • Improved laser productivity potential due to increased overlap within the build field
  • Frontload transport system of automated internal transport system

A flexible configuration makes it possible for the build and process time to dictate the LPS to the ratio of the M LINE Factory MHS, or Material Handling Station. This processing unit, which comes with an integrated sieving station, is for powder management and pre/post processing, and automates both the upstream and downstream stages of the production process.

Additionally, the MHS uses automation, digitization, and interlinking to provide interfaces to more conventional manufacturing methods. The MHS has high safety standards, including an automated module lidding system that contains full powder and inert gas, water-flood passivation of filters, contactless powder handling, and no manual handling in the process chamber.

To learn more about the innovative M LINE Factory, which will ship to customers in Q2 of 2019, visit GE Additive at formnext this week in booth D30, Hall 3.

Discuss this news and other 3D printing topics at 3DPrintBoard.com or share your thoughts in the Facebook comments below

[Images provided by GE Additive]

HP’s Multi Jet Fusion and Metal Jet 3D Printing Technology Continue to Accelerate

As formnext kicks off in Frankfurt, Germany, several companies are already making big announcements. HP is no exception, blazing into formnext with a series of updates regarding its Jet Fusion 3D printing technology.

“HP is accelerating the shift to 3D mass production, enabling an exciting array of applications helping customers improve their businesses as we enter the 4thIndustrial Revolution. Many industries such as automotive, which is going through its biggest transformation in more than 100 years, are looking to new technologies and strategic partners like HP to help them better compete in this time of change,” said Christoph Schell, President of 3D Printing and Digital Manufacturing, HP Inc. “We are working with innovators across the globe to change the way they design and manufacture with HP Multi Jet Fusion and our new Metal Jet platform, unlocking new applications, more manufacturing flexibility, and greater innovation, efficiency and sustainability across their product development lifecycle.”

Part of HP’s news involves the continuing worldwide expansion of its technology with the addition of some new customers. RecTech 3D is based in China and will be using Multi Jet Fusion technology as it expands into a full-fledged industrial Additive Manufacturing Center in Chongqing. Working with HP, the company plans to offer application and design expertise as well as training to customers and partners. In early 2019, RecTech 3D will begin installing 10 HP Jet Fusion 3D 4210 printers in its Additive Manufacturing Center, with plans to grow to 30 machines by the end of the year.

“As a premier partner of HP in China, RecTech 3D is looking to help lead industrial innovators and designers to take advantage of digital production and manufacturing, and we believe HP Multi Jet Fusion technology offers the capabilities required to deliver on that promise,” said Jay Luo, CEO, RecTech 3D. “In addition to offering the production of parts using HP Multi Jet Fusion technology, we will provide our customers with educational resources and end-to-end solutions based on HP’s industry-leading 3D printing products and expertise that enable the entire process from design to production. Using HP Multi Jet Fusion technology we plan to transform manufacturing.”

Meanwhile, US-based Forecast 3D is growing steadily with the installation of 24 HP Jet Fusion 3D 4210 in its digital factory. In addition, GE Transportation will use HP’s Jet Fusion solutions in its John F. Welch Technology Center in Bangalore, India to produce industrial parts for applications in mining vehicles and locomotives.

“Our business continues to reap the rewards of leaning in early and going big with HP Multi Jet Fusion technology,” said Corey Weber, CEO, Forecast 3D. “Our 3D Manufacturing Center is now powered by 24 HP Jet Fusion 3D 4210 printers. We are serving more customers than ever, running 24×7, and on pace to surpass millions of Multi Jet Fusion parts produced this year.”

In the automotive industry, BMW Group is using HP Jet Fusion 3D 4200 printers to manufacture the window guide rail for the BMW i8 Roadster, while Volkswagen Group is using HP systems for both metal and plastic. By the end of the year, 100 percent of the tools used to manufacture the new T-Cross SUV will be 3D printed using Multi Jet Fusion technology. In addition, Volkswagen will begin to use HP’s Metal Jet 3D printing technology starting with mass-customizable parts such as key rings and name plates.

“Using our automotive standards and HP’s Multi Jet Fusion technology our manufacturing team is able to produce durable, reliable final parts such as the window guide rail for our BMW i8 Roadster,” said Dr. Dominik Rietzel, Head of Non-Metal Additive Manufacturing at the BMW Group. “In the past decade, we are proud to have produced more than one million 3D printed parts, and it’s fitting that one of these window guide rails was identified as the one-millionth part printed. Complex parts that require reliable functionality and a small footprint are a perfect example of the power of additive manufacturing and together with partners such as HP we are excited about the possibilities ahead.”

HP recently introduced the new PA-11 material, which has seen a great deal of use already. Its properties include strength, ductility, impact resistance and enhanced elongation break. Bowman International used the material to produce a rollertrain cage, while orthotic company OT4 used it to create a sleep helmet. Other parts produced with PA-11 include shoe heels by New Rock and personalized phone cases by Freshfiber.

HP’s Jet Fusion 3D 300/500 series is a lower-cost version of its MJF technology, and early customers include A-Dec, a dental equipment manufacturer using the technology to produce fixtures, jigs and low-volume service parts; Rady Children’s Hospital, which is using it to create casts, corrective devices, and anatomical models; and the University of Louisville, which is using the technology in numerous applications across several departments.

HP is now offering new online resources for partners and customers who are looking to accelerate their adoption of 3D printing for mass production. These include the i-AMdigital Talent Platform, a digital career growth platform for additive manufacturing, and 3D ExchangeNet, a marketplace dedicated to helping 3D printing businesses identify growth capital, investment or buyout opportunities.

At formnext, HP will be showcasing its recently introduced Metal Jet technology, which, according to the company, can offer up to 50 times more productivity at lower cost than competitors. Companies using the technology already include Volkswagen, GKN Powder Metallurgy, Parmatech, Wilo, Primo Medical Group and OKAY Industries. In the first half of 2019, customers will be able to order Metal Jet parts through the new Metal Jet Production Service.

Formnext is taking place from today until November 16th. You can visit HP at Booth E40 in Hall 3.1.

Discuss this and other 3D printing topics at 3DPrintBoard.com or share your thoughts below.

 

Design and Customize the Perfect Presents with Our Creator Apps

The holidays are fast approaching and with them, the annual extended panic attack over finding exclamation-worthy gifts for all of your family and friends. But this year, instead of rushing through packed stores and standing on seemingly endless lines just to end up with something that doesn’t fully capture the uniqueness of your loved one, why not design the perfect present yourself? Shapeways makes it easy to create and customize a whole array of products so each one feels singular and made specifically for its recipient. Below we’ve assembled some of our favorite creator apps that can help you nail the holidays this year from the comfort of your own home.

 

Spring & Wonder

The new destination for customizable jewelry, Spring & Wonder lets you select the shape, size, message, and material of a whole range of high-quality pieces, from necklaces to rings and earrings.  

 

Ciphering

This app creates a ring with a sentimental surprise – built into the physical form of each ring is an encoded number of your choosing, which is only revealed when you shine light or look through it at the right angle.

 

Twine

Twine interlocks two names of your choosing into a chic necklace pendant, connecting loved ones forever.

 

Cookie Caster

Buying a present for the baker in your life? Make standard cookies a thing of the past with Cookie Caster, the app that allows you to draw and 3D print your own unique cookie cutter.

 

Our creators apps are for everyone, helping new as well as experienced 3D designers create their own perfect piece in a breeze. So skip the holiday rush this year and use Shapeways to create timeless gifts that show your loved ones exactly how well you know them.

The post Design and Customize the Perfect Presents with Our Creator Apps appeared first on Shapeways Magazine.

ARBURG premieres freeformer 300-3X multi-material 3D printer

ARBURG, a German 3D printer and injection molding systems manufacturer, has debuted the freeformer 300-3X, a multi-material and multi-color 3D printer. Lukas Pawelczyk, Head of Sales freeformer, said, “As a revolutionary next step, we’re celebrating the world premiere of the freeformer 300-3X at the Formnext 2018, which will expand the ARBURG product range and open […]

Could 3-D Printing Save Music Education? | #MakerEducation

Screen Shot 2018 11 07 at 3 26 17 PM

Via Smithsonian Mag.

Kaitlyn Hova is many things: a violinist, a web developer, a designer, a composer and a neuroscientist. And it was the blurring of these interests that bore a clear and clever idea.

As music programs are being slashed from school budgets, and STEM education is receiving more funding, why not take advantage of the influx of 3-D printers and teach students how to print their own musical instruments?

Hova and her husband, who cofounded Hova Labs, have developed the Hovalin, an open source, 3-D printable acoustic violin.

At “The Long Conversation,” an event that brought together 25 thinkers for an eight-hour relay of two-person dialogues at the Smithsonian Arts & Industries Building last December, Hova even performed on a souped-up Hovalin that paired her notes with a colorful light show emitted from the transparent body of the instrument.

Read more.


Adafruit_Learning_SystemEach Tuesday is EducationTuesday here at Adafruit! Be sure to check out our posts about educators and all things STEM. Adafruit supports our educators and loves to spread the good word about educational STEM innovations!

Additive Industries Brings MetalFAB1 3D Printing System to New Partnership with Volkswagen

There are a variety of large-scale metal 3D printing systems to choose from nowadays, but one of the earlier companies to offer 3D printing on a massive scale was Additive Industries, which introduced its MetalFAB1 system in 2015. With a build envelope of 420 x 420 x 400 mm, the MetalFAB1 was one of the largest metal 3D printers available at the time. It also features multiple build chambers, offering a means for manufacturers to utilize 3D printing for industrial-scale production.

Additive Industries has become a valued partner in the automotive industry, working with Switzerland’s Sauber F1 team to produce components for its race cars. Now the company has announced a partnership with Volkswagen, which is no stranger to 3D printing itself.

“We see great potential for 3D metal printing of a broad range of car parts and tooling and have joined forces in Volkswagen internally to increase our facility seven fold to be prepared for the digital future,” said Klaus-Jürgen Herzberg, Betriebsrat.

Additive Industries will work with the Volkswagen Group to 3D print advanced tooling and spare parts.

“The investment in the most modern 3D printing equipment allows us to continue to be front-runners in toolmaking and give our craftsmen access to the latest technology,” said Oliver Pohl, Department Manager.

In September, Additive Industries installed its fully automated and integrated MetalFAB1 system in Wolfsburg, and the first 3D printed products have been produced after intense training for the Volkswagen team.

“For Additive Industries, the partnership with Volkswagen, the world’s largest car maker is a confirmation of our strategy to accelerate industrial additive manufacturing and focus on innovators in their markets,” said Daan Kersten, CEO of Additive Industries.

Additive Industries was established in 2012 in Eindhoven, the Netherlands. Founders Kersten and Jonas Wintermans built the company on the principles of “open innovation,” dedicating a team of professionals to accelerating the industrialization of additive manufacturing. The company has seen its technology successfully used in the aerospace, automotive, medical technology and high-tech equipment industries.

“We are proud to work closely with the Volkswagen team in Wolfsburg to execute on our roadmap for manufacturing excellence and expansion of the metal additive manufacturing footprint,” said Jan-Cees Santema, Sales Director Europe for Additive Industries.

With access to Additive Industries’ technology, Volkswagen will benefit from the ability to produce tooling and spare parts at rapid rates, accelerating its production and allowing it to make 3D printing a truly pivotal part of its manufacturing processes.

Additive Industries is currently attending formnext, which started today in Frankfurt, Germany and is running until November 16th. If you’re at the show, you can visit the company at booth E40 in Hall 3.0 to learn more about the MetalFAB1 system and its partnership with Volkswagen. 3DPrint.com is at the show as well.

Discuss this and other 3D printing topics at 3DPrintBoard.com or share your thoughts below