Optomec releases new interchangeable LENS Deposition Head for optimized DED processing

Optomec, the Albuquerque-based company behind Aerosol Jet Printing technology, has introduced the Laser Engineered Net Shaping (LENS) Deposition Head (LDH 3.X), which ensures optimized directed energy deposition (DED). “As metal additive manufacturing users continue to seek higher laser powers, faster speeds, and improved deposition rates to maximize production, they don’t want to sacrifice the quality of the build,” said Tom […]

3D Printing News Briefs: October 18, 2019

The stories we’re sharing in today’s 3D Printing News Briefs run the gamut from materials to new printers. Altair has launched its new industrial design solution, and Remet opened a metal 3D printing lab in Poland. Innofil3D is sharing lots of material news, and Equispheres has released the test results for a unique 3D printing powder. Finally, Hackaday published a micro 3D printer project.

Altair Launches New Industrial Design and Rendering Solution

The “Geko Ring Collection,” jewelry by Luca Palmini, designed and rendered with Inspire Studio. Image courtesy of Luca Palmini.

Global technology company Altair has launched Inspire Studio, its new 3D design and rendering solution, to help architects, designers, and digital artists create, evaluate, and visualize designs. The solution builds on the functions of Altair Evolve, and includes 3D rendering and animation software Inspire Render, which helps users rapidly generate photorealistic product renderings and animations. Both Inspire Studio and Inspire Render run on MacOS and Windows, and help designers open up their creativity to go beyond traditional CAID tools. The solutions will be introduced next month during a one-day launch event in Italy, and you can also get a free ticket to formnext 2019, where you can learn more about Inspire Studio and Inspire Render at Altair’s booth E11, hall 11.1.

“We are very pleased with these two new solutions for the global industrial design community. Inspire Studio builds on our previous industrial design tool, Evolve, while going beyond Evolve’s capabilities. Inspire Studio will enhance designers’ creativity by letting them drive their designs. It offers an intuitive user interface and a powerful construction history, allowing them to quickly create and explore multiple iterations of their design. Relying on the same modern user experience with powerful interactive, full progressive and raytracing rendering engine, Inspire Render will help designers quickly run photorealistic renderings and walkthrough animations on GPUs and CPUs,” said James Dagg, CTO at Altair.

3D Design and Rendering Software | Altair Inspire Studio

Remet Opens Modern Metal 3D Printing Laboratory

Polish steel structures manufacturer for the oil and gs mining industry, Remet, has launched a metal 3D printing laboratory equipped with a range of high quality machines and devices. The first of these is the DMP Flex 350 by 3D Systems, followed by 3D Systems’ Figure 4, the office-friendly metallic powder atomizer ATO Lab, and plenty of other specialized research equipment. Remet completed the project together with 3D Lab, a top Polish industrial 3D printer distributor and manufacturer of the ATO Lab.

The ATO Lab metal atomizer, which enables testing and fabrication of many powdered metal alloys, was the starting point for this unique laboratory. A new branch of the enterprise, called Remet Metal Labs, is where the company will work on comprehensive additive manufacturing and industrial applications projects. Its goal is to create highly flexible conditions for creating prototypes in the powder production field, and automotive, aviation, and space industry customers are invited to work with Remet to take advantage of the lab. 3D Lab and Remet will present their solutions together at formnext in Frankfurt next month.

Innofil3D Materials and Design Rules Video

This week, Innofil3D, and its parent company BASF, have a lot of news to share. First up, Ultrafuse BVOH, its water-soluble support filament, is now available for purchase, along with its new Ultrafuse 316L metal filament. Designed for easy FFF 3D printing, this is the company’s first metal material – 80% stainless steel with a 20% polymer content.

For users interested in 3D printing their Innofil3D PRO1 filament on a Raise3D printer, you can now join the Raise3D Open Filament Program to take advantage of optimized settings and print profiles. This new program is a collaboration between Raise3D and filament manufacturers, like Innofil3D, to find the top-performing materials for its 3D printers. Finally, Innofil3D has released its second video tutorial for design rules and principles of FFF 3D printing. Check out the video below, and be sure to visit BASF at its large K-Fair exhibit in Hall 5, C21/D21.

Equispheres Releases Test Results for Unique AM Powder

Materials science technology company Equispheres has released the results from its first powder testing phase, completed by a facility that certifies AM materials for applications in aerospace and defense. The results have confirmed that the powder has exceeded expectations, allowing for a 20-30% increase in mechanical performance and a 50% increase in production speeds. In light of this news, Equispheres is launching new equity financing in order to, as the company wrote in a press release, “grow and unlock the vast potential of Additive Manufacturing.”

“The unique properties of our powder, including the high sphericity, narrow particle size distribution and low surface area results in significantly increased packing density.  This allows an increase of powder layer thickness by a factor of 2 which significantly increases build speed. Most importantly, this boost to build speed does not come with a mechanical performance penalty.  Instead, the uniform nature of our powder ensures that parts are produced with reliable and consistent mechanical properties.  The minimal variance in our performance results provides design engineers the statistical confidence to produce stronger, lighter parts,” said Equispheres’ CTO, Dr Martin Conlon.

Hackaday Project: Micro Deltesian 3D Printer

A new Hackaday project by architect Ekaggrat Singh Kalsi was just published – a micro Deltesian 3D printer, which he says offers a quality that’s on par with any Cartesian 3D printer. The printer has a solid aluminum frame, with a standard slider Y axis and a Delta mechanism for the XZ axis. A 3.5″ LCD touchscreen, with a built-in SD card, is fast and easy enough for his young daughter to use, which was his ultimate goal. With an 80 x 100 x 85 mm build volume and a print bed held in place with magnets, the biggest challenge in making the minuscule 3D printer easy to use was the filament loading; Singh Kalsi used a lever-based latch mechanism for this.

“the micro deltesian was born out of the curiosity of building the convoluted deltesian mechanism,” he explained. “Later on it evolved into the idea of building a 3d printer simple enough to be used by my daughter. The deltesian mechanism seem very wierd when i first saw it but eventually i thought maybe i should give it a try and hence this printer was born.”

Watch the video below to see just how easily his daughter uses the micro Deltesian 3D printer:

Discuss these stories and other 3D printing topics at 3DPrintBoard.com or share your thoughts in the Facebook comments below. 

The post 3D Printing News Briefs: October 18, 2019 appeared first on 3DPrint.com | The Voice of 3D Printing / Additive Manufacturing.

Lulzbot closing by end of October? Lawsuit filed by employee

Following the speculation that Aleph Objects, manufacturer of Lulzbot open-source 3D printers had met its end, the company has refused to deny claims that it is indeed shutting down.  An email attributed to Aleph Objects states, “We regret to inform you that the owners of Aleph Objects Inc, makers of Lulzbot 3D printers, have decided to […]

Essentium scales HSE 3D printer production and expands global operations

Essentium Inc., a Texas-based 3D printer provider, has announced a series of expansions in response to growing demand for its High Speed Extrusion (HSE) 3D printing platform. These include scaling up the production of the HSE FDM 3D printer, accelerating material development, and expanding global operations with new leadership appointments. Essentium credits the market response […]

3D Printing News Briefs: October 14, 2019

In today’s 3D Printing News Briefs, everything is new, new, new! Carbon is announcing a new RPU 130 material, and STERNE Elastomere introduces its antimicrobial silicone 3D printing. Protolabs launches a new polypropylene 3D printing service in Europe, and Hydra Research has officially released its flagship Nautilus 3D printer.

Carbon Introduces RPU 130 Material

At this week’s International K Trade Fair in Dusseldorf, Carbon will debut its new RPU 130 resin, a rigid polyurethane that’s rigid, tough, impact resistant, and stands up under high temperatures, making it a perfect choice for the automotive industry in applications such as brake caliper covers. Made exclusively for Carbon’s Digital Light Synthesis, the dual-cure engineering resin is comparable to unfilled thermoplastics, and Carbon also partnered with DuPont Tate & Lyle Bio Products to make RPU 130 out of sustainable Susterra propanediol, a 100% bio-based material that uses 46% less nonrenewable energy from cradle-to-gate and produces 48% less greenhouse gas emissions as well.

“We are focused on ways to incorporate more sustainable approaches to developing materials, and our partnership with DuPont Tate & Lyle emphasizes that commitment,” stated Jason Rolland, SVP of Materials at Carbon. “We believe that sustainability can go hand-in-hand with improved performance. In the case of RPU 130, we believe it will make the material even more appealing for our customers, as it makes it possible to create better quality products that are also ultimately better for the environment.”

You can learn more about Carbon’s new RPU 130 at its K-Show booth, H7.2, F12 from October 16-23.

Antimicrobial Silicone 3D Printing by STERNE

French silicone 3D printing specialist STERNE will also be attending K 2019 this month. Three years ago, the company unveiled its silicone 3D printer at K 2016, and its SiO-shaping 3D silicone printing technology makes it possible to fabricate very small pieces, according to standard ISO 3302-01 :2014 (M2) tolerances, at hardness from 30 to 60 Shores A. The printer also offers a full panel of colors in opaque, phosphorescent, and translucent.

The company is now combining 3D printing with antimicrobial silicone, in order to keep the silicone odor-free, avoid bacteria developing, improve the hygiene of a 3D printed object, and strengthen its immune barrier as well. You can learn more about this antimicrobial silicone 3D printing at STERNE’s Stand E23, Hall 8A, at K 2019.

Protolabs Offering Polypropylene 3D Printing in Europe

For the first time, digital manufacturing company Protolabs is offering polypropylene 3D printing, with the launch of a new service in Europe. The company has invested a lot in developing the material to be used with selective laser sintering (SLS) technology, on an SPro 60 system. SLS 3D printing with polypropylene plastic allows design engineers to rapidly develop and test prototypes, and fabricate complex designs as well, like internal channels and honeycomb structures.

“Polypropylene is one of the most used plastics available to modern manufacturers and is widely used for a number of applications. Polypropylene is one of the most used plastics available to modern manufacturers and is widely used for a number of applications. Now that we can produce a prototype in polypropylene, design engineers can develop and test it in an application using the same material that it will be manufactured from. The product design can then be quickly reiterated and retested until they have the perfect solution, before committing to tooling. This breakthrough takes product development to the next level using the most versatile of plastics, ” said Andrea Landoni, 3D printing product manager for Protolabs.

“Before, if you wanted to use polypropylene then you were limited in what you could design by the manufacturing technology available to you. Now the only limitation is your imagination.”

Hydra Research Releases Flagship 3D Printer

Oregon company Hydra Research, which began in a closet three years ago as a peer-to-peer print service, has announced the release of it flagship 3D printer, the Nautilus. The fully enclosed, industrial-grade desktop system – assembled in Portland – features a quick-change Tool Cartridge system that integrates E3D’s V6 hotend for fast nozzle switching, in addition to an integrated software solution. It also supports a variety of materials, provides Cura profiles for easy slicing, has a small footprint in a sleek frame, and offers customizable HydraCare support and consulting packages

“As a company, our primary goal is producing world-class hardware on an open source platform,” explained John Kray, the Founder and CEO of Hydra Research. “Manufacturers like E3D, Duet3D, and Fillamentum combine these values perfectly.”

You can now purchase Hydra’s Nautilus 3D printer on the company’s website, in addition to spare parts, accessories, and filament.

Discuss these stories and other 3D printing topics at 3DPrintBoard.com or share your thoughts in the Facebook comments below. 

The post 3D Printing News Briefs: October 14, 2019 appeared first on 3DPrint.com | The Voice of 3D Printing / Additive Manufacturing.

Lulzbot not dead – despite rumors to the contrary

Rumors spreading around the untimely demise of popular open-source 3D printer manufacturer Lulzbot are untrue.  Internet speculation has gained pace from an initial post on Reddit earlier today and spread to blog posts. Lisa Ketner, VP of Global Sales & Support at Aleph Objects, confirmed to 3D Printing Industry that the company is very much […]

3D Printing News Briefs: October 10, 2019

We’re talking about events and business today in 3D Printing News Briefs. In November, Cincinnati Inc. is presenting at FABTECH, and Additive Manufacturing Technologies and XJet are heading off to formnext. Moving on, Thor3D has announced a new partnership with Rhinoceros.

Cincinnati Incorporated Showing at FABTECH

Machine tool manufacturer Cincinnati Incorporated (CI) is going to FABTECH 2019 next month in Chicago, and plans on showcasing its recently announced partnership with Hendrick Motorsports, along with the #88 car driven by Alex Bowman, and its latest machines at the event. CI is now a full-season associate sponsor of the team’s four-car stable for the next ten years, in addition to its Official Metal Fabrication and Additive Equipment Provider. The racecar will be in booth #A2973 at the show, along with CI’s Hyform and AFX press brakes, Roboform cell, and new CLX laser, which was built specifically for automation-minded metal fabricators. The company’s high temperature Small Area Additive Manufacturing (SAAM HT) machine will be on display in booth #A3839, and its Medium Area Additive Manufacturing (MAAM) machine will make its official debut to the public.

“We’re ready to get to FABTECH and show the fabricating world what we’ve been up to in the past year. Walking through our facility, you can feel the energy and see the production happening. It’s exciting and it’s contagious, and we can’t wait to share it,” said Matt Garbarino, Director of Marketing Communications at Cincinnati Incorporated.

XJet Bringing Extended Carmel Product Line to formnext

FABTECH isn’t the only show in November – formnext is taking place in Frankfurt from November 19-22, and XJet announced that it will be introducing two new versions of its Carmel 1400 3D printer at the event. The Carmel 1400M for metals and the Carmel 1400C for ceramics, both of which use XJet’s NanoParticle Jetting technology, are part of the company’s continuing work to, as XJet put it, “redefine metal and ceramic AM.”

“Formnext is always a highpoint on XJet’s calendar. Each year we hit new milestones, and this is particularly evident at Formnext. From Formnext, XJet will offer two systems, the Carmel 1400C devoted to ceramics and the Carmel 1400M dedicated to metals. While both systems use the same NanoParticle Jetting technology, they are different and have been optimized to handle the different materials. Both will be demonstrated on our booth throughout the show,” said XJet’s CBO Dror Danai.

At Booth C01 in Hall 12.1 of formnext, XJet will demonstrate multiple applications and sample parts that showcase its NPJ technology for both metal and ceramic 3D printing. Representatives from the company’s distribution network will be on hand to answer question, and visitors can also enjoy an immersive, virtual reality experience into XJet’s NanoParticle Jetting at the booth.

Additive Manufacturing Technologies Presenting Modular, 3D Printed Booth at formnext

Sheffield-based Additive Manufacturing Technologies (AMT) will also be attending formnext as it officially exits stealth mode. The company will be showcasing a customizable, modular, and sustainable stand construction at the event, with over 6,000 3D printed parts that will connect 1,100 meters of aluminum tubing to create the booth, which was designed and constructed by Steel Roots Design. Materialise printed the parts out of Nylon PA 2200 material, using SLS technology by EOS, and they were then post-processed with AMT’s own PostPro3D platform. The lightweight parts have complex geometries, with moving features and internal threads that would have been impossible to create using another fabrication process.

“The whole point of exhibiting at a show like Formnext is to demonstrate your technologies and capabilities. At AMT we don’t want to just tell people how good our technologies are, we want to really show them. Our unique stand will show how functional and sustainable 3D printed parts — even at higher volumes — can be utilised when using our automated post processing technologies,” stated AMT’s CEO Joseph Crabtree.

“This level of sustainability commitment is a fundamental principle for AMT at every level of the business. Every decision we make takes sustainability into consideration.”

See AMT’s 120 kg stand structure for yourself at Booth 361, Hall 12.1, at formnext next month. Once it’s been constructed, several other company innovations will be showcased inside, such as the automated Digital Manufacturing System (DMS).

Thor3D and Rhinoceros Sign Partnership Agreement for New Product

3D scanner manufacturer Thor3D and Rhinoceros software developer McNeel have signed a partnership agreement so that Rhino software can now be resold by Thor3D’s distribution partners, along with multiple plug-ins, in a bundle with the Calibry handheld 3D scanner. Rhino’s set of tools for analysis, animation, engineering, free-form 3D modeling, and engineering can now be supplemented by Calibray scans, which can be used as base models. In addition, the bundle can also be extended using Brazil and Penguin rendering software, the Flamingo nXt rendering engine, and integrated animation by Bongo.

“Rhino software is widely known and used worldwide. Many of our customers already use it and our goal is to make it even more accessible to a wider audience. Engineers and digital artists alike, will find this software, in combination with our 3D scanners, extremely helpful in their day-to-day work,” said Anna Zevelyov, the CEO and Co-Founder of Thor3D.

Recommended retail price for the new Calibry and Rhino bundle will be €5,700.

Discuss these stories and other 3D printing topics at 3DPrintBoard.com or share your thoughts in the comments below. 

The post 3D Printing News Briefs: October 10, 2019 appeared first on 3DPrint.com | The Voice of 3D Printing / Additive Manufacturing.

Additive Manufacturing Open Cluster in Bavaria: TUM, Oerlikon, GE Additive & Linde Collaborate

Several heavy hitters on the international additive manufacturing scene have come together to form a research cluster. With the goal of researching AM processes from one location, a ‘single hub,’ The Technical University of Munich (TUM), Oerlikon, GE Additive and Linde are collaborating on how to integrate AM into manufacturing processes and help companies transition to the use of newer technology.

Designated as an ‘open cluster,’ the collaboration will include numerous universities responsible not only for researching AM but also teaching. Regulatory authorities are also involved in the cluster, as they continue to perform oversight and regulation regarding industry technologies. The collaboration will be open to expansion with new participants as time goes on.

“By having all of the players located in a single hub, we are accelerating the development and application of the technology for the various industries,” commented Professor Dr. Michael Suess, Chairman of the Board of Directors of the Oerlikon Group, in a recent press release sent to 3DPrint.com. “Bavaria is the perfect place for us to house this initiative as it promotes energy and production efficiency, which supports Germany’s sustainability goals and the country’s desire to incorporate new technologies.”

From left to right: Dr. Sven Hicken (Business Unit Head, Oerlikon AM), Prof. Dr. Thomas Hofmann (President, TUM), Jason Oliver (President and CEO, GE Additive), Dr. Wolfgang Dierker (CEO, GE Germany), Dr. Christoph Laumen (Executive Director R&D, Linde AG), Prof. Dr. Michael Suess (Chairman of the Board of Directors, Oerlikon Group), Dr. Christian Haecker (Head of Industrialization, Oerlikon AM), Dr. Andreas Lessmann (Managing Director, GE Additive Germany GmbH, Senior Leader, Legal Operations), Dr. Christian Bruch (Executive Vice President & CEO, Linde Engineering), Andreas Rohregger (Head of Global Properties, GE Additive), Dr. Alice Beck (Deputy Director, TUM ForTe). Signing Letter of Intent in Dec. 2018.

Organizations such as TUM, Oerlikon, GE Additive and Linde are highly invested in the transformative powers of AM, as well as helping companies adjust to the accompanying changes to the following:

  • Supply chain
  • Production
  • Employee training
  • Quality inspection
  • Product validation
  • Regulation

 “The project is an excellent example of close collaboration between industry, academia and politics to innovate and industrialize a technology like additive manufacturing,” commented Dr. Roland Fischer, CEO of the Oerlikon Group. “AM is a technology that supports our aim of providing sustainable solutions for all industries.”

The group has chosen a progressive locale for their work in AM:

“Bavaria already enjoys a stellar reputation as a global hotspot for additive technology – with a thriving ecosystem and a rich seam of talent,” said Jason Oliver, President and CEO of GE Additive. “We’re excited to be part of this initiative from the very beginning and look forward to building on that solid foundation and driving tangible impact both for the region itself and further afield.”

One of the initial steps taken on by the research cluster will be the opening of The Additive Manufacturing Institute, a site dedicated to:

  • Interdisciplinary research in raw material powders
  • Optimized AM production
  • End-to-end process integration (plus automation and AM digitalization)

As they continue to offer a comprehensive program regarding AM research and operating procedures, Oerlikon will be sending both engineers and scientists to TUM faculties—also assisting in verification and qualification of product development.

“We see this opportunity to collaborate as a win for the companies and TUM, as well as for the region,” said Dr. Christian Bruch, Member of the Executive Board, CEO of Linde Engineering. “We expect the new hub will bring jobs to the area, while also delivering new technologies and capabilities to the companies located here.

The institute will be open to other companies and universities also, but not until after the initial foundation is set, with frameworks established. Projects such as this are an extension for companies like GE Additive, already heavily involved in offering innovation such as development of new combat vehicles, new materials like metal powders, magnetic components, and much more.

“An integrated collaboration between powerful partners from industry and science is necessary for the industrialization of additive manufacturing processes,” said Professor Dr. Thomas Hofmann, President of TUM. “This is the only way we will be able to overcome technological obstacles and find answers to unresolved issues in the field of standardization.”

The new additive manufacturing cluster and research institute are being highlighted at the Munich Technology Conference (MTC3), which is currently taking place at the Technical University of Munich in Germany (October 8-10, 2019). The conference this year addresses the industrialization of additive manufacturing and features top speakers from the industry, academia and political sectors.

What do you think of this news? Let us know your thoughts! Join the discussion of this and other 3D printing topics at 3DPrintBoard.com.

[Source / Images: Oerlikon press release]

The post Additive Manufacturing Open Cluster in Bavaria: TUM, Oerlikon, GE Additive & Linde Collaborate appeared first on 3DPrint.com | The Voice of 3D Printing / Additive Manufacturing.

Marie Langer to focus on sustainability of 3D printing as new CEO of EOS

Leading German 3D printer OEM EOS has appointed a new CEO. Effective immediately, Marie Langer, the daughter of company founder Dr. Hans Langer, will assume leadership of EOS GmbH, seeing outgoing CEO Dr. Adrian Keppler take on a role as managing director. Announced today via the company website, Langer has stated that her leadership will see […]