Enclosure for LoraWan TTN Gateway: Raspberry Pi + RAK831

Amedee shared on Thingiverse:

Enclosure for LoraWan TTN Gateway: Raspberry Pi + RAK831

Enclosure for RAK831 LoraWan Gateway.

The enclosure allows air circulation to avoid overheating.

BOM
Aside the Raspberry Pi, the RAK831 LoraWan gateway and its converter board you will need:

4 M2.5×12 to secure the Raspberry Pi
4 M3x8 + 3 M3 nuts for the feet
4 M3x8 round head to close the enclosure


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Every Thursday is #3dthursday here at Adafruit! The DIY 3D printing community has passion and dedication for making solid objects from digital models. Recently, we have noticed electronics projects integrated with 3D printed enclosures, brackets, and sculptures, so each Thursday we celebrate and highlight these bold pioneers!

Have you considered building a 3D project around an Arduino or other microcontroller? How about printing a bracket to mount your Raspberry Pi to the back of your HD monitor? And don’t forget the countless LED projects that are possible when you are modeling your projects in 3D!

The Adafruit Learning System has dozens of great tools to get you well on your way to creating incredible works of engineering, interactive art, and design with your 3D printer! If you’ve made a cool project that combines 3D printing and electronics, be sure to let us know, and we’ll feature it here!

Ice Powered Desktop Air Conditioner

shared on thingiverse:

Ice Powered Desktop Air Conditioner

Created in both Fusion 360 and Tinkercad. Requires an 80mm case fan and a 12v power supply to power it. I haven’t printed the lid yet but I assembled and tested the fan. The air was coming out of the top so I created it. The tray holds a perfect amount of ice and it will not overflow from the reservoir. With the tray angled towards the front, all the melt water drips away from the fan.


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Every Thursday is #3dthursday here at Adafruit! The DIY 3D printing community has passion and dedication for making solid objects from digital models. Recently, we have noticed electronics projects integrated with 3D printed enclosures, brackets, and sculptures, so each Thursday we celebrate and highlight these bold pioneers!

Have you considered building a 3D project around an Arduino or other microcontroller? How about printing a bracket to mount your Raspberry Pi to the back of your HD monitor? And don’t forget the countless LED projects that are possible when you are modeling your projects in 3D!

The Adafruit Learning System has dozens of great tools to get you well on your way to creating incredible works of engineering, interactive art, and design with your 3D printer! If you’ve made a cool project that combines 3D printing and electronics, be sure to let us know, and we’ll feature it here!

Researchers Inspired by Nature to Develop Recyclable Liquid Crystal Polymers for FDM 3D Printing

While it’s possibly to quickly manufacture complex parts at a low cost using fused deposition modeling (FDM) 3D printing, the readily available polymers are fairly weak, and the completed 3D prints have poor adhesion. According to an ETH Zürich research group that specializes in 3D printing complex materials, this one of the reasons why FDM is not used successfully to fabricate commercial products.

Polymer performance has been traditionally increased by adding strong, stiff, continuous fibers into the material, like glass or carbon, but it takes a lot of time, effort, and expensive equipment to develop these composite materials, which are also difficult to recycle. But the researchers have developed a bio-inspired approach to 3D print recyclable liquid crystal polymer (LCP) materials using desktop FDM systems.

According to a press release, “For the first time, researchers from the Complex Materials group and the Soft Materials group at ETH Zürich, were able to print objects from a single recyclable material with mechanical  properties that surpass all other available printable polymers and can compete even with fibre-reinforced composites.”

During development, the team was inspired by two materials found in nature: wood and spider silk, the latter of which has inspired other 3D printing innovations in the past. The material’s silk proteins have a high degree of molecular alignment along the fiber directions, which gives spider silk its “unrivalled mechanical properties.”

3D printed samples of specimens with print lines following the stress lines and the biological inspiration represented by a wood knot.

The researchers were able to duplicate this high alignment during extrusion by using an LCP as FDM feedstock material. This gave the material excellent mechanical properties in the deposition direction. In addition, its anisotropic fiber properties were put to good use by “tailoring the local orientation of the print path according to the specific loading conditions imposed by the environment,” which was inspired by how living tissue, like wood, can arrange fibers along its stress lines while it grows and adapts to its surrounding environment.

The team published a paper on their work with 3D printing strong LCPs, titled “Three-dimensional printing of hierarchical liquid-crystal-polymer structures,” in the Nature journal.

Loop test of 3D printed LCPs.

The abstract reads, “Fibre-reinforced polymer structures are often used when stiff lightweight materials are required, such as in aircraft, vehicles and biomedical implants. Despite their very high stiffness and strength, such lightweight materials require energy- and labour-intensive fabrication processes, exhibit typically brittle fracture and are difficult to shape and recycle. This is in stark contrast to lightweight biological materials such as bone, silk and wood, which form by directed self-assembly into complex, hierarchically structured shapes with outstanding mechanical properties, and are circularly integrated into the environment. Here we demonstrate a three-dimensional (3D) printing approach to generate recyclable lightweight structures with hierarchical architectures, complex geometries and unprecedented stiffness and toughness. Their features arise from the self-assembly of liquid-crystal polymer molecules into highly oriented domains during extrusion of the molten feedstock material. By orienting the molecular domains with the print path, we are able to reinforce the polymer structure according to the expected mechanical stresses, leading to stiffness, strength and toughness that outperform state-of-the-art 3D-printed polymers by an order of magnitude and are comparable with the highest-performance lightweight composites. The ability to combine the top-down shaping freedom of 3D printing with bottom-up molecular control over polymer orientation opens up the possibility to freely design and realize structures without the typical restrictions of current manufacturing processes.”

The team’s materials, in addition to being more easily recyclable, are far stronger than typical 3D printed composite polymers, and are not nearly as difficult to fabricate. This means that it should now be possible to 3D print FDM structures for industry use as lightweight, structural parts.

Example 3D prints made with LCPs

“Because the research has been conducted using a readily available polymer and a commercial desktop printer, it should be easy for the broader additive manufacturing and open source communities to adopt this new material and digitally design and fabricate strong and complex lightweight objects from LCPs,” the ETH Zürich press release states. “Thus, the technology is expected to be a game-changer in several structural, biomedical and energy-harvesting applications and finally enable complex FDM printed parts that mimic natural structural designs to be manufactured for the mass market.”

Co-authors of the paper are Silvan Gantenbein, Kunal Masania, Wilhelm Woigk, Jens P. W. Sesseg, Theo A. Tervoort, and André R. Studart.

Discuss this research and other 3D printing topics at 3DPrintBoard.com or share your thoughts below.

Dragon Hands #WearableWednesday #cosplay

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Very clever 3D printed fabric dragon hand gloves. Shared by Core3D on Instructables:

My daughter is already planning for Halloween this year and mentioned going as a dragon. As a 3D Printing dad, I couldn’t just stand by.

In this instructable I’ll show how you can 3D print items integrated with a mesh material (no glue required) allowing you to create all sorts of interesting things that can be integrated as costume (think Halloween or Cos Play)

Credit where credit is due, I did not invent this technique. I’m just using it. The first time I saw this was at MRRF 2018 (Midwest Rep Rap Festival) where it was applied (and possibly invented) by David Shorey at Shorey Designs.

The principal is fairly simple: You print one or 2 layer as usual, you then pause the print, apply some sort of mesh and continue printing. The next layers will bond with the layers below the mesh creating a strong integrated print and fabric “thingy”.

For this instructable I use Slic3r for creating the g-code. Programs like Simplify 3D have more sophisticated ways of manipulating g-code but what I show here should apply to any g-code (regardless of slicer).

For this instructable, It is assume that you know how to use slicers and how to 3D print.

Learn more!

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Flora breadboard is Every Wednesday is Wearable Wednesday here at Adafruit! We’re bringing you the blinkiest, most fashionable, innovative, and useful wearables from around the web and in our own original projects featuring our wearable Arduino-compatible platform, FLORA. Be sure to post up your wearables projects in the forums or send us a link and you might be featured here on Wearable Wednesday!

ARRK Uses 3D Printing to Develop Sensitive Dummy for Automotive Testing

Automotive manufacturers use dummies for more than just testing how well a vehicle will hold up in a crash. They also use them to test comfort factors, such as temperature and other environmental conditions. Recently, ARRK Engineering was in need of a dummy to help automotive manufacturers test passenger thermal comfort and environmental conditions in cars, and it turned to ARRK’s prototyping division to help develop a dummy using 3D printing.

The main body parts of the dummy were designed to be fixed together with ball joints and angle joints that are lockable in various positions, enabling the simulation of passenger movement inside the vehicle. It also had needed sensors to measure air temperature, air velocity, radiation and relative humidity on the surface of the body panels.

The CAD data for the dummy was sent to ARRK’s prototyping center in Gloucester, where 26 components were 3D printed with ARRK’s selective laser sintering (SLS) process using glass filled nylon material. Those components included the dummy’s head, arms, legs, torso, hands and feet. In addition to the 3D printed parts, more than 60 components were CNC machined from steel and aluminum. These parts also included some welded fabrications that the Gloucester team fitted inside the SLS 3D printed parts.

The project designers, who are based at ARRK Engineering’s site in Cluj-Napoca, Romania, communicated regularly with the prototyping team to make sure that the parts were being built to schedule and and in line with the characteristics specified for each component. The parts were then painted in ARRK’s in-house paint shop and color matched to exact RAL requirements.

The project’s lead engineer visited the prototyping center and worked with the Gloucester team to assemble the dummy and make sure that it worked as expected. After assembly, it was shipped to ARRK’s engineering headquarters in Munich, which employs more than 1,000 people. Once it arrived in Munich, the dummy was fitted with sensors and pressure pads.

3D printing has been used to make crash test dummies as well; the technology is useful in that it can create easily customized dummies to represent people of all ages, sizes, genders and body types. Humanetics, which makes crash test dummies, is even considering making 3D printed replicas of individual organs in order to better understand how each organ can be impacted by an automobile accident. 3D printing is allowing testing dummies, whether for crash testing or other purposes, to be made more and more realistic.

ARRK, which was founded in 1948, is one of the world’s largest product development specialists. Through a series of acquisitions and mergers, it has become a global company with offices all over the world, more than 20 locations and over 3,000 employees. ARRK offers not only product development but low volume production as well. Three years ago, the company opened a facility dedicated to 3D printing in Poland – not its first rapid prototyping facility, but a sign that ARRK was embracing 3D printing to a larger extent. ARRK offers several 3D printing technologies, including FDM, SLS, SLA, Polyjet and DMLS.

Discuss this and other 3D printing topics at 3DPrintBoard.com or share your thoughts below. 

[Images: ARRK]

 

GE Additive Customer Uses DMLM 3D Printing to Manufacture Blades for Medical Cutting Device

endoCupcut

As the population continues to age, the number of necessary hip replacements rise, which means we’re seeing more 3D printed hip implants and hip cups. Implanting a hip cup is fairly straightforward these days, but removing one, for reasons ranging from abrasion and infection to loosening, is another story. Surgeons typically have to use a hammer and chisel for this, which can damage tissue and bone and make it hard to reinsert a new implant.

Germany medical device company Endocon, a GE Additive customer, is using additive manufacturing to make it easier for surgeons to remove hip replacement cups. The company isn’t 3D printing the cups, but instead created a new device, called an acetabular cut cutter, with 3D printed blades. This product has improved not only the surgical experience for the patient and physician, but the cost savings and product reliability as well.

“We’ve also been able to reduce the cost per blade by around forty to forty-five percent. That means cost savings for us and in turn for our customers,” said Klaus Notarbartolo, the General Manager at Endocon. “When you combine that with a reduction in product development time, higher efficiency and lower rejection rates, then the business case for additive really becomes attractive.”

Typically, traditional casting is used to manufacture cutting blades, but for an end product that comes in a variety of shapes and sizes, it could take up to three and a half months to produce a single batch of blades. Casted blades can also have a rejection rate of about 30% due to issues like non-repeatable quality, corrosion, and consistent hardness.

The company called on GE Additive’s Concept Laser Mlab Cusing 100R, which uses direct metal laser melting (DMLM) technology, to 3D print the blades for its endoCupcut in 17-4 PH stainless steel. This reusable device allows surgeons to quickly loosen and extract cementless hip cups without damaging the surrounding bone, as its blades allow for more precise cutting along the edge of the acetabular cup. Additionally, it can be combined with up to 15 different 3D printed stainless steel blades in sizes ranging from 44 mm to 72 mm, and makes it possible to implant the same size cup that was originally there.

The 3D printed blades for the endoCupcut, which had only minimal changes from the original model, can be available in just three weeks, including post-processing. The device now has a rejection rate of less than 3%, can achieve consistent outcomes, and the 3D printed blades show excellent corrosion resistance. Rather than cracking after 600 N, the blades show a plastic deformation after applying 1,8 kN, and their hardness level has improved to 42+-2 HRC, compared to 32 HRC.

“Endocon’s ability to solve multiple challenges using additive is impressive example of how it can have a positive impact for smaller companies targeting the orthopedic industry,” said Stephan Zeidler, Business Development Manager Medical for GE Additive. “What started with the need for a reduced time-to-market in terms of product development and flexible production of various shapes and sizes has resulted in a smart, innovative medical product that enhances patient outcomes.

“Moving the entire production process from casting to additive manufacturing was a logical step and that shift continues to provide inspiration for future projects.”

Metal 3D printing specialist and service bureau Weber-KP manages the entire process, including data preparation, build platform orientation, 3D printing, surface finishing, hardening, and bead blasting, for Endocon. The company has even improved the manufacturing process of the blades in order to, as GE Additive put it, “maximize the best possible outcome” and can fit between two and six blades on the Mlab Cusing 100R’s build platform, depending on orientation and size.

Using DMLM technology to 3D print the blades has improved their mechanical properties, and also ensures high density and accuracy. By using stronger, harder, and more reliable blades on the endoCupcut, the device performs better for the surgeon in the operating room, and also makes things safer for the patient by lowering the risk of breakage and splinters being embedded in their tissue. Using this device, surgery time has been decreased from 30 minutes to just three, and its precise cutting method preserves the highest possible amount of bone substance, which “supports an accelerated healing process for the patient.”

Other benefits of fabricating the endoCupcut blades with DMLM 3D printing include:

  • High-fitting accuracy of blades through modular system of ball-shaped heads
  • Perfect fitting of ball-shaped heads in a 38-60 mm width
  • Reusable for multiple operations
  • Wear-resistant and easy to sterilize

Lowering surgical risk saves hospitals money and time, and the world is definitely taking notice of Endocon’s innovative work. The endoCupcut is already being used by several medical professionals around Germany, and the company itself is a finalist in the TCT Awards next week.

Discuss this story and other 3D printing topics at 3DPrintBoard.com or share your thoughts below. 

[Images provided by GE Additive]

ETH Zürich develops carbon fiber rival for desktop 3D printers

Wood and spider silk have inspired the development of a new desktop 3D printable material that reportedly outperforms “state-of-the-art printed polymers”. Developed by a team of researchers at ETH Zürich, Switzerland, this bioinspired material contains liquid crystal polymer (LCP) particles that rival the use of glass and carbon fiber reinforcements. A more sustainable alternative to […]

MIT CSAIL Creates 3D Printable Sculptures of the Body in Motion

[Image: MIT CSAIL]

MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) is responsible for numerous fascinating innovations, many of them related to 3D printing, including color-changing ink, origami-inspired robots, and much more. The lab’s latest project is an especially fascinating one. CSAIL is currently focusing on the movement of the human body. While some athletes will study film of themselves or their opponents in order to improve their own performances on the field or court, two-dimensional videos can only give them a limited viewpoint. CSAIL’s “MoSculp” project uses an algorithm to take those 2D videos and turn them into 3D printable “motion sculptures.”

The technology is detailed in a paper entitled “MoSculp: Interactive Visualization of Space and Time.” The researchers believe that it could be a new way for athletes to study the motion of the human body.

“Imagine that you have a video of Roger Federer serving a ball in a tennis match, and a video of yourself learning tennis,” said PhD student Xiuming Zhang, lead author of the paper. “You could then build motion sculptures of both scenarios to compare them and more comprehensively study where you need to improve.”

Users can use a computer interface to navigate around the motion sculptures and see them from every angle. The sculptures can also be 3D printed.

Different techniques have been used in the past to try to get a full visual understanding of the body in motion. Stroboscopic photography techniques, in which hundreds of photographs are snapped in rapid sequence and then stitched together like a flip book, have commonly been used. These are still only snapshots, though, that provide limited understanding. CSAIL’s technique takes a video and automatically detects key 2D points on the subject’s body, then takes the best possible poses from those points to be turned into 3D “skeletons.” Those skeletons are then stitched together and a motion sculpture is generated.

Users can do a lot with the sculptures, customizing them to focus on different body parts, assigning different 3D printed materials to distinguish among parts, or customizing lighting. In a user study, the researchers learned that more than 75 percent of subjects felt that MoSculp provided a more detailed visualization for studying movement than standard photographic techniques.

“Dance and highly-skilled athletic motions often seem like ‘moving sculptures’ but they only create fleeting and ephemeral shapes,” said Courtney Brigham, communications lead at Adobe. “This work shows how to take motions and turn them into real sculptures with objective visualizations of movement, providing a way for athletes to analyze their movements for training, requiring no more equipment than a mobile camera and some computing time.”

The system works best with larger movements, such as throwing a ball or leaping. It also works in situations that might obstruct or complicate movement, like someone wearing loose clothing or carrying an object. At this point, the system only uses single people to construct motion sculptures, but the researchers hope to expand it to multiple people shortly. They believe that it could be used to study things like social disorders, interpersonal interactions and team dynamics.

The paper will be presented at the User Interface Software and Technology (UIST) conference, which will be taking place in Berlin from October 14th to 17th. Authors of the paper include Xiuming Zhang, Tali Dekel, Tianfan Xue, Andrew Owens, Qiurui He, Jiajun Wu, Stefanie Mueller, and William T. Freeman.

Discuss this and other 3D printing topics at 3DPrintBoard.com or share your thoughts below. 

 

La Bandita: Siemens Automotive Project Uses Hybrid Manufacturing

World famous conglomerate Siemens recently announced a novel new automotive project with Hackrod. Both companies are looking to leverage a host of modern technologies including hybrid manufacturing, AI and VR into the automotive field with a project they have dubbed ‘La Bandita’. The project will present an entirely new approach, looking to upend traditional car manufacturing […]

The post La Bandita: Siemens Automotive Project Uses Hybrid Manufacturing appeared first on 3D Printing.