Mixed Dimensions & Mimaki Partnering to Bring 3D Printed Gaming Collectibles to the Market

Integrated reality and 3D printing technology startup Mixed Dimensions (Mxd3D) has announced a global strategic partnership with Mimaki Engineering Co., Ltd, a top company in the digital printing sector and developer of high-resolution, full-color 3D printing systems. The partnership will be focused on 3D printing and modeling services, as well as 3D software.

Mxd3D was founded seven years ago by Muhannad “Mo” Taslaq and Baha Abunojaim in Jordan, but is now headquartered in San Francisco, California. The company, which is backed by several top-tier venture firms such as Silicon Badia and Susman Ventures, started out as web-based software for 3D designers to upload their work and verify that their designs would come out correctly, and eventually established the leading GamePrint software platform and MakePrintable cloud-based 3D CAD file repair software as its core technologies.

3D printed Gods from Assassin’s Creed Origins (Image: Mixed Dimensions)

Both of its platforms make it easy for developers of digital intellectual property (IP), and specifically gaming companies, to create and provide 3D printed full-color versions of their important assets. Once someone places a request, the products are 3D printed in San Mateo, and can then be shipped to customers all over the world.

Mimaki is a leader in the industrial products, sign graphics, and textiles & apparel markets, and has already committed a significant amount of resources to its new partner, including an equity investment and some of its breakthrough, high-quality 3D printing hardware.

“Our experience working with Mimaki Engineering has been extraordinary,” stated John Vifian, Mixed Dimensions’ President and COO, in a press release. “Working closely together, we have unlocked manufacturing capabilities that were heretofore simply impossible, and what we have already achieved is only the beginning.”

Mixed Dimensions’ CEO Taslaq said, “Mixed Dimensions is building the merchandising factory of the future, to meet the growing global demand for personalized collectible objects.”

Mo Taslaq, Co-founder and CEO of Mixed Dimensions (Image: Mixed Dimensions)

Mr. Ikeda of Mimaki will be joining the board of directors at Mixed Dimensions, along with Taslaq, Pascal Levensohn of Dolby Family Ventures, Gilman Louie of Alsop-Louie Partners, two of the other venture firms which back Mixed Dimensions.

“We are very excited to welcome Ikeda-san as an independent director,” Tom Kalinske, Executive Chairman of the Mixed Dimensions board, said in the release. “Mimaki is the clear leader in full-color 3D printing, and we are proud to have them as a strategic partner and investor.”

The newly announced collaboration between these two companies will likely speed up the expansion and growth of the worldwide market in full-color 3D custom game collectibles, which have been increasing in popularity over the last few years.

What do you think about this? Discuss this story and other 3D printing topics at 3DPrintBoard.com or share your thoughts in the Facebook comments below.

The post Mixed Dimensions & Mimaki Partnering to Bring 3D Printed Gaming Collectibles to the Market appeared first on 3DPrint.com | The Voice of 3D Printing / Additive Manufacturing.

Additive Industries CEO Daan Kersten Steps Down as Firm Receives $14M Investment

One of a newer generation of metal laser powder bed fusion (PBF) manufacturers, Additive Industries is continuing to grow rapidly. The latest news is a $14 million investment from its existing shareholder, Highlands Beheer. With the funds, the company aims to expand its product portfolio, speed up its technological development strategy and shore up its working capital. This last use for the investment is meant to ensure financial resilience for the company amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

Outgoing Additive Industries CEO Daan Kersten (L) with Jonas Wintermans (R). Image courtesy of Additive Industries.

Highlands has acquired the shares of the startup’s CEO and co-founder, Daan Kersten, who will leave the company by June 30, 2020. In the interim, Chief Technology Officer Mark Vaes, who has been with Additive Industries since 2013, will fill the role. Kersten said of the decision:

“This substantial investment confirms the long-term commitment of Highlands to the growth ambitions of the company and it allows Additive Industries to make yet another significant step on its mission to revolutionize the productivity for the additive manufacturing of high-quality metal parts. After eight intense years of fast growth I feel the time is right to make way and hand over the reins to new leadership.”

The firm has quickly rolled out a modular metal PBF system with a high degree of automation and throughput. By reducing the need for operator intervention, the MetalFAB1 system is able to produce parts more rapidly, with pre- and post-processing operations happening in parallel to the build job. The next step in its roadmap was the development with SMS Group of automated factories called the Scale4Series, in which parts can be printed and post-processed automatically. In the process, Additive Industries has earned a number of high profile partners and clients, including Airbus/APWORKS, Volkswagen and the Sauber F1 team.

Cutaway of the MetalFab1 from Additive Industries. Image courtesy of Additive Industries.

As Highlands is increasing its share of the 3D printing firm, it’s worthwhile to learn a bit more about the company. In fact, Highlands now says that it owns Additive Industries, in addition to a cigar machinery manufacturer, ATD Machinery, and NTS Group, which produces optomechatronic systems and mechanical modules for original equipment manufacturers. Interestingly, the CEO of NTS is also stepping down this August.

A rendering of the Scale4Series in development by Additive Industries and SMS Group. Image courtesy of Additive Industries.

Highlands is owned by the Wintermans, a Dutch family that founded and ran Royal Agio Cigars, one of the largest cigar manufacturing businesses in Europe, before selling it to Scandinavian Tobacco Group last year. The family divvied up 10 million Euros among its employees as a part of the deal. Highlands maintains its ATD business, meaning that it will continue to focus on the tech side of cigar making, but its investment in Additive Industries and its ownership of NTS Group signifies a continued shift in the family’s business operations overall, which previously had been making cigars since 1904. The sale of Royal Agio seems to suggest that the transition of Highlands from a cigar company to a tech company is near complete.

The post Additive Industries CEO Daan Kersten Steps Down as Firm Receives $14M Investment appeared first on 3DPrint.com | The Voice of 3D Printing / Additive Manufacturing.

Dassault Systèmes: Revenue Report, New COO, Increase Focus on Virtual Twin

Dassault Systèmes, the 3DEXPERIENCE company, is starting the weekend with a little business, by making several announcements. First, the company revealed its IFRS unaudited financial results for the 4th quarter and year ended December 31st, 2019. The results, reviewed by the Board of Directors earlier this week, show that Dassault’s total revenue went up by 13%, from €3.65 to €4.06 billion, and that it’s expected to keep growing in 2020 by 21-23%. You can read the highlights, and financial summary, for Q4 and Fiscal Year 2019 here.

“All IFRS and non-IFRS figures are presented in compliance with IFRS 15 and IFRS 16, which have been applied since January 1st, 2018 and January 1st, 2019, respectively,” Dassault declared in a news release.

The company also announced that its Chief Financial Officer, Pascal Daloz, has now also been appointed Chief Operating Officer. In this new position, created to help expand Dassault’s strategic direction and empower its “new generation of leadership,” Daloz will lead the new Operations Executive Committee, which will support the company’s goal to drive innovation in the sectors of manufacturing, life sciences and healthcare, and infrastructure and cities.

“Pascal’s strong knowledge of Dassault Systèmes and his skills in a wide range of domains such as science and engineering are major assets that will enable him to accomplish the dual role of Chief Operating Officer and Chief Financial Officer.  His appointment also reflects our plan to prepare for the company’s future while maintaining continuity in its leadership and direction,” stated Bernard Charlès, the company’s Vice Chairman and CEO. “In only two years as CFO, Pascal has already defined new strategic and financial ambitions for the company. For these reasons, Pascal is the right person to help me implement Dassault Systèmes’ vision of transforming industries, markets and customer experiences with the 3DEXPERIENCE platform, ensure the execution of the company’s holistic, growth-centric strategy, and manage its performance.”

Daloz joined Dassault Systèmes in 2001 as Vice President Research & Development in charge of market development, and has been moving up the ranks ever since, including being named Executive Vice President, Brands and Corporate Development in 2014. He has helped the company enter new sectors and embrace future trends, including acquiring Medidata in October; this decision helped to cement life sciences as Dassault’s second largest core industry. As COO, he will coordinate the company’s operational decision-making processes for strategic functions, including the 3DEXPERIENCE platform and its 11 brands.

Speaking of life sciences, the company has announced its strategic direction for the future, which focuses on solutions for the life science industry through developing the human digital twin – really, a virtual twin.

“In 1989, we created the first virtual twin of a giant airplane, the Boeing 777,” explained Charles. “In 2012, observing that the world was shifting to an experience economy that values usage over product, we dared to imagine a platform that would use comprehensive virtual twins of things as the place to navigate, evaluate, and holistically experiment with an idea to make it reality. We named it the 3DEXPERIENCE platform. Our customers, as they adopt it, are making it the catalyst and enabler of the Industry Renaissance. Our ambition to harmonize product, nature and life remains the same, while its scope is broadening. It has led us to develop a new understanding of life and nature.  Today, we’re capable of applying the knowledge and know-how we acquired in the non-organic world to the living world, extending our focus from things to life. The virtual twin experience of the human body will enable us to invent new ways of representing life by understanding and representing the invisible, and make a lasting contribution for the benefit of all.”

You’ve likely heard of the digital twin, which is an idea that in the digital manufacturing world, by combining software with mass customization, every product in a company’s inventory will have a unique file that contains all of its specific settings and production information. But the human body is far more complex, and the healthcare industry needs to refine how therapies for patient care are discovered, developed, produced, used, and commercialized. A virtual twin can change how we cure people, as it enables health-related disciplines to understand, test, model, and treat the human body – just like the digital twin makes this possible for products in industrial sectors.

“Why “virtual” rather than digital? Well, precisely because the value of what we do lies in the potential it offers for imagining the future. “Virtual” is about what’s possible – the potentiality. In that sense, the virtual is the very essence of human nature: we are virtual beings. We are beings of possibility,” Dassault writes on its website.

“So to improve life, we have to invent new ways of representing reality. We have to invent the virtual twin experience of life.”

The 3DEXPERIENCE platform can integrate collaboration, information intelligence, modeling, and simulation to make a virtual twin of the human body possible. By combining material sciences, information sciences, and biosciences, stakeholders will be able to to actually project an object’s data onto a living, virtual model, which can then be configured and simulated for research and testing purposes. For example, before a human patient is treated, researchers could potentially be able to see how a certain drug could affect a disease.

Dassault will be building up its leadership in healthcare and life sciences, along with manufacturing industries and infrastructure and cities, as these all have similar sustainability needs and development processes in the ongoing efforts to improve our overall quality of life.

Discuss this news and other 3D printing topics at 3DPrintBoard.com or share your thoughts below.

The post Dassault Systèmes: Revenue Report, New COO, Increase Focus on Virtual Twin appeared first on 3DPrint.com | The Voice of 3D Printing / Additive Manufacturing.

Carl Deckard Passes Away

It is with sadness that we learned this weekend that Carl Deckard has passed away. Carl was a true industry pioneer in 3D printing. Starting under UT professor Bob Beaman, Carl Deckard was part of an innovative UT team that was developing manufacturing technologies. He reportedly was watching an episode of Star Trek the original series when he thought of how the Star Trek team was able to visualize the transporter. “Beam me up Scottie” was an important element of the science fiction show. It turned out that the transporter special effect was created by arranging colored loose sand so that it resembled the objects being materialized by the transporter. This knowledge triggered an idea in Carl’s head, “what if just like the transporter special effect in Star Trek, he could also use sand to make up objects by arranging them just so?” This thought lead to Carl inventing Selective Laser Sintering as a Master’s Thesis project. He later commercialized the technology in 1987 through his firm DTM. After a few precarious year DTM sold its first machine to Sandia National Labs. DTM was very successful and brought the selective laser sintering technology to market across the globe.

Still today you can see twenty-year-old, low slung blue DTM machines dutifully building parts in service bureaus around the world. The trusty sinterstations are still in use so many years later and reliably spit out thousands of parts. SLS as a technology is special because of this quality. SLA, Stereolithography (and DLP) let us make millions of smooth highly detailed parts for molds and hearing aids. FDM (material extrusion) let us make rough but dimensionally accurate parts reliably. Where SLS really shines is in making ten thousand of something day after day. In applications such as surgical guides, prototyping, dental guides and spare parts SLS can make very detailed, tough parts in their tens and thousands. SLS is reliable and predictable which has made it a bedrock for our industry for decades. Especially in the service bureau world, SLS is the versatile technology that makes millions of different parts day in day out. When we think of mass customization for end use parts SLS is still the most promising technology and a significant part of our total output as an industry. We have Carl to thank for this.

An early SLS part made at UT.

In 2001 Carl sold DTM to 3D Systems. His path in innovation was not done then, however. Carl was a Professor at Clemson and later developed a four-stroke engine with just one moving part. In 2011 he returned to 3D printing with the Structured Polymers team. This team has developed breakthrough SLS materials over the past few years, some being acquired by Evonik. The team is now working on full color materials. Carl’s impact on 3D printing is so significant that it is permanent. His innovative idea that became his Thesis and later a firm, has influenced the development of our industry to such a fundamental degree that we can never extricate ourselves from his memory and influence, nor should we wish to.

The post Carl Deckard Passes Away appeared first on 3DPrint.com | The Voice of 3D Printing / Additive Manufacturing.

3D Printing News Briefs: December 15, 2019

In this edition of 3D Printing News Briefs, it’s business, business, business, and then an upcoming event, 3D Alliances signed a collaboration agreement with Xact Metal. Sigma Labs has appointed a new Executive Chairman to its board of directors. Finally, mark your calendars – NAMIC Summit 2020 is coming to Singapore in May.

3D Alliances Teams Up with Xact Metal, Welcomes Team Member

Israeli consulting company 3D Alliances has announced a new collaboration agreement with Pennsylvania startup Xact Metal, which develops metal powder bed fusion systems. 3D Alliances will be supporting Xact Metal as it works to deploy channels and find new sales partners in the Asia Pacific (APAC) region.

“No doubt, metal 3D printing solutions are on the rise as professional and industrial users are looking for new solutions that will help them integrate metal technologies in their research and development, prototyping and short run manufacturing processes. Xact Metal answers these exact needs offering professional systems in a very attractive entry point,” stated Gil Lavi, the Founder and CEO of 3D Alliances. “Once the price barrier is no longer a big issue, the acceleration in the adoption of metal systems is inevitable. We look forward working with Xact Metal team bringing it’s great products to the Asia Pacific market.”

But that’s not the only news 3D Alliances is sharing – Scott Hill, a veteran in the 3D printing industry, is joining the company as a senior consultant for North America. This completes its global coverage, as 3D Alliances also has teams in APAC and the DACH region of Europe.

Sigma Labs Names Mark K. Ruport New Executive Chairman

Speaking of new additions, 3D printing quality assurance software developer Sigma Labs has appointed Mark K. Ruport as its executive chairman, and a member of its board of directors. Ruport is an accomplished software executive, with over three decades of experience in both public and private companies, and will work with fellow board member, and the company’s CEO, John Rice to help drive the formation of strategic relationships and sales strategies, increase shareholder value, and speed up growth.

Ruport said, “The ability to have an immediate, tangible impact on Sigma Labs with the apparent adoption of its incredible technology in the marketplace is a unique and exciting opportunity. My focus will be on accelerating our commercial adoption with strategic partners and amplifying the recent success John and his team have achieved. This blueprint is something I am very familiar with given my experience with disruptive companies in the software sector and I look forward to working with the entire team at Sigma Labs to drive forward its strategic initiatives.”

As an inducement award outside of its 2013 Equity Incentive Plan, Sigma Labs granted Ruport non-qualified stock options, in accordance with NASDAQ Listing Rule 5635(c)(4).

Save the Date for NAMIC Summit 2020

NAMIC (National Additive Manufacturing Innovation Cluster) is hosting its AM Summit 2020 at the Marina Bay Sands EXPO and Convention Centre in Singapore, May 11-15. In addition to a full conference, featuring more than 1,000 local and international delegates and industry leaders, the summit will also include workshops and certification courses, an industry showcase, behind-the-scenes tours at several industry facilities, and the NAMIC Start-up Innovation Forum, held at SGInnovate on the last day of the summit.

“Presenting a variety of activities and programmes with the NAMIC Conference anchoring the summit, this will be a unique experience for global 3D printing experts, adopters, innovators and professionals to interact for knowledge sharing and discussions on the latest 3D printing innovations, designs and process development as well as wide-spread industrial adoption,” the NAMIC AM Summit 2020 states on its website.

You can register your interest in attending the latest summit by NAMIC here.

Discuss these stories and other 3D printing topics at 3DPrintBoard.com or share your thoughts in the Facebook comments below. 

The post 3D Printing News Briefs: December 15, 2019 appeared first on 3DPrint.com | The Voice of 3D Printing / Additive Manufacturing.

3D Printing News Briefs: December 3, 2019

We’re starting today’s 3D Printing News Briefs out with a new case study, and then concluding with some business. CRP USA has been working with additive manufacturing in the motorsports sector. Moving on, Gardner Aerospace has acquired FDM Digital Solutions Ltd. Finally, the Head of Engineering at Formlabs is joining up with Digital Alloys.

CRP USA AM in Motorsports Case Study

3D printed oil pan in Windform SP, University of Victoria’s Formula SAE race car 2019 version

The University of Victoria (UVic) Formula Motorsport team has been using 3D printed oil pans on their SAE competition cars for the last four years that were created with CRP USA‘s laser sintering process, and Windform TOP-LINE composite materials. As a CRP case study details, carbon-composite Windform XT 2.0 was used to print the oil pans for the race vehicles in 2016, 2017, and 2018, and while they performed “amazingly” the first two years, the engine overheated during a test of last year’s car, which caused the temperature of the oil to rise above what the pan could handle.

For this year’s vehicle, the team decided to use the carbon-filled Windform SP composite material to 3D print the oil pan, as it has a higher melting point. They also made the mating flange thicker to lessen the chances of failure, and both of these changes led to a better, more robust oil pan. At next week’s Performance Racing Industry (PRI) Trade Show in Indianapolis, CRP USA will be showing off some of the other 3D printed solutions it’s helped create for the motorsports industry at booth 1041 in the Green Hall.

Gardner Aerospace Acquires FDM Digital Solutions

Graeme Bond (FDM) & Dominic Cartwright (Gardner Aerospace)

Global manufacturer Gardner Aerospace announced its acquisition of FDM Digital Solutions Limited, one of the UK’s top polymer additive layer manufacturers. FDM was formed in 2012, and its business model of original design solutions, manufacturing capability, and customer collaboration is successful in the aerospace, automotive, medical, and motorsports industries. The company will now become part of the new Gardner Technology Centre business unit, which is focused on R&D and advanced technology.

“Gardner Aerospace is breaking new ground in terms of technology. The acquisition of FDM and the creation of our new Technology Centre business unit provides us with the perfect opportunity to expand our technical knowledge, R&D capability and product offering, and aligns us with our customers’ growing expectations on innovative solutions, continuous improvement and cost competitiveness,” stated Gardner Aerospace CEO Dominic Cartwright.

“The role of 3D printing within manufacturing is constantly expanding and this newly acquired additive layer manufacturing capability complements Gardner’s long-standing capabilities as a producer of metallic detailed parts and sub-assemblies.”

Formlabs’ Head of Engineering Joins Digital Alloys

Carl Calabria

Carl Calabria, an AM industry veteran and the Head of Engineering at Formlabs, is leaving the company to join Digital Alloys, Inc. as its CTO. The Burlington, Massachusetts-based 3D printing company introduced its unique Joule printing last year, which it claims is the fastest way to make the hardest metal parts, as the wire-feed process doesn’t require any metal powder. By adding Calabria to its team, where he will be responsible for the company’s research and engineering, Digital Alloys can accelerate the release of its high-speed metal AM process.

“Leaving Formlabs was a difficult decision, but I was drawn to the size of Digital Alloys’ market, the team, and the opportunity to use Joule Printing to deliver metal printing solutions that have the speed, cost and quality needed for volume manufacturing of larger parts,” said Calabria. “The remarkable technology is producing titanium and tool steel parts faster, and at lower cost than conventional manufacturing processes.”

Watch this video to see Digital Alloys’ Joule printing process in action:

 

What do you think? Discuss these stories and other 3D printing topics at 3DPrintBoard.com or share your thoughts in the comments below. 

The post 3D Printing News Briefs: December 3, 2019 appeared first on 3DPrint.com | The Voice of 3D Printing / Additive Manufacturing.

Joseph DeSimone Out as Carbon CEO, Replaced by Ellen Kullman

Sometimes executives wish to spend less time with their families; today, Joseph DeSimone is stepping down as Carbon CEO. Joseph will instead become Executive Chairman of the Board. His replacement is Ellen Kullman, who will also remain on Carbon’s board (as well as a number of other boards that she sits on, such as Goldman’s). Ellen seems like a perfect candidate given her background as a mechanical engineer and in senior positions at GE, GM and DuPont. Indeed her experience at automotive firms, polymer firms, and her extensive network are very valuable to the firm. It is a bit unclear at this point, however, if she is a “placeholder” until a full-time CEO has been found or if she will change from serving on boards and councils to go back to the day-to-day running of a company. Either way, she is a safe pair of hands to run the firm and to lead this transition at this time.

And it will be quite the transition. Joseph founded Carbon six years ago. His TEDX speech made a huge impact and immediately the company was launched into the stratosphere. Expectations were high and the company has shown itself to be a master at marketing. Creating inevitability is something Carbon has done very well. With its CLIP (DLS) technology, it has a potentially faster method to print SLA parts and the firm parlayed this into a self-reinforcing hype around making manufacturing possible. Hundreds of millions were raised and the firm expanded quickly.

I’ve gone on the record extensively as being skeptical of Carbon’s claims and the suitability of its technology as a manufacturing technology. At this point, I don’t believe that the world wants a thermoset plastic that can not be recycled as a huge volume manufacturing technology. I do not think consumers will stand for it. I also do not believe that Carbon can work well with parts that have a significant cross-sectional area or indeed are very large. Whereas Carbon’s materials portfolio is very impressive with stronger, specific and flexible materials, I’ll always be skeptical of the real-life performance of these parts as end-use parts. The firm’s leasing model is innovative but the TCO is simply too high as in the cost per part. If the firm had always maintained that it was an effective technology for some geometries of small SLA parts for dental and molds then I’d be fine with it. The idea however that CLIP/DLS specifically would unlock a manufacturing revolution in end-use parts always filled me more with dread than optimism. 3D printing is manufacturing technology. There is a concrete floor somewhere waiting for machines to make things. You can interest people through promises and overinflated expectation but in the final analysis an entrepreneur or company will have to spend money on something that works. In the face of reshaping our world, we as an industry should be humble, truthful and clear.

It is the hyperbole and self-congratulatory nature of the firm that has always bothered me. Don’t get me wrong, Joseph’s scientific work and Carbon’s process is innovative. Carbon’s ability to market itself and push the conversation about 3D printing forward is awesome. I’m very impressed with the firm’s accomplishments and Joe’s role in taking a technology (of several) and raising an incredible $682 million. Carbon is a real achievement but then the firm spoils it all. The press release states, “I am privileged to have spent the last few years on the Carbon board working alongside Joe, one of the greatest entrepreneurs and scientists of our time.” Yes, he’s super impressive but he didn’t discover DNA, people. Come on.

“For the last six years, I have led Carbon as Chief Executive Officer and am enormously proud of what we’ve accomplished during my tenure/ I know what we will accomplish under Ellen will be even more extraordinary. Ellen is the right person to lead Carbon today. She has broad experience across multiple businesses, cycles, and geographies. Her vision, outstanding leadership traits, and distinguished track record will continue to drive Carbon’s growth into the future. In assuming the Executive Chairman role, I will be able to focus on evangelizing the platform and driving adoption more widely.”

So what has happened here? There are broadly, three scenarios.

  1. As espoused by a formerly quite impressive magazine: this could be a logical planned step for the next phase of the company’s development. That drops during Formnext. Without an event or extensive canapes and drinks. Without being pre-whispered to the press in advance? Without a nice round of OMG it was amazing interviews before. I’m skeptical about this because Joseph wasn’t some WeWork cray-cray-peneur. He seemed to be on top of the firm’s growth and development and had credibility in our industry. He was optimistic sure, but not nuts.
  2. Performance at Carbon could have been disappointing investors. If I look around then it wouldn’t surprise me if the number of initially shipped units would not have all of a sudden done a hockeystick and increased as projected. A manufacturing technology is perhaps not as predictable in its growth as an app. It is difficult to find applications customers and firm and industrialize 3D printing processes. With limited sizes and geometries, the number of possible applications Carbon can tackle remains limited. I know of only one customer using Carbon as some scale to manufacture end-use parts, but that probably just my limited knowledge of the industry talking.
  3. I really do hate to have to bring up the Speedfactories again but the closure of the Speedfactories (along with a post-closure as hoc announcement that they will be continuing with Carbon) plus the impending departure from Adidas of Board Member Eric Liedke may have dented investor’s confidence in turning hope & friends into dollars in manufacturing.
  4. As someone stated to me only yesterday, fear surrounding returns after WeWork has made boards and investors much more critical of deployed capital than in the past, and perhaps this review has also occurred at Carbon.

All in all, Joseph DeSimone has really propelled our industry forward. As a scientist and business leader he has shown us as CEO what one could do by asking “What if 3D Printing Were a 100 Times Faster.” Still a valid question.

Join the discussion of this and other 3D printing topics at 3DPrintBoard.com.

The post Joseph DeSimone Out as Carbon CEO, Replaced by Ellen Kullman appeared first on 3DPrint.com | The Voice of 3D Printing / Additive Manufacturing.

Origin to Begin Shipping New Industrial 3D Printer, the Origin One

Today Origin will begin shipping their new Origin One, an industrial 3D printer which the San Francisco-headquartered company claims is already in high demand internationally. In fact, the developer of open platforms for additive mass production has already doubled their installed base.

Currently, Origin is working with customers in the US, Ireland, Germany, and Denmark, engaged in the following applications:

  • Footwear
  • Automotive
  • Contract manufacturing
  • Government

“Shipping our first production printer, Origin One, is a huge milestone for the company,” said Chris Prucha, co-founder, and CEO of Origin. “The tremendous customer growth and demand we’ve seen for the printer, as well as the positive reception from our open material network, is extremely gratifying and proof that we’ve created a platform that our customers need.”

In their recent press release to 3DPrint.com, Origin also announces that they are adding Avid and Interpro to their service bureau customer roster. They have had other major news too, aside from moving into a much larger space and adding a lab, as Jeffrey Lee has come on board as their chief operating officer, previously at DCM as a venture partner, and founder of Cost Cooperative, a member-based buying group for small businesses.

“I’ve worked with this team for almost two years, and I’ve never been so convinced that Origin is poised to finally bring additive to mass manufacturing,” said Jeffrey Lee, COO, Origin. “I’m excited to join the team and help Origin realize this vision.”

Origin will also offer Origin One parts to many of their customers through their new service bureau, passing on the benefits of 3D printing to their client base as they are able to get the components they need without having to invest in all the hardware, software, and materials—although that may be something they decide to do later as additive manufacturing continues to take hold for so many applications around the world.

“We’re thrilled to expand our additive capabilities and offer Origin’s P3 technology to customers,” said Doug Collins, Owner of Avid Product Development. “Origin’s throughput, material selection, and part quality will help us serve many more production applications today and in the future.

“We’re excited to offer Origin’s P3 technology to our wide range of customers in the automotive, aerospace and medical industries,” said Dan Straka, General Manager of InterPro. “Origin One will enable us to produce end-use parts with excellent surface quality and dimensional accuracy. Plus, the parts will be made of production-grade materials from the Origin Open Material Network.”

The company has also continued to refine their offerings, making significant improvements to Origin One with software, increasing:

  • Useable build area
  • Print speed
  • Chemistry capabilities
  • Surface quality

“Equipped with a true 4k lithography engine and a native resolution of 50μm, Origin One has the highest resolution and most flexible polymer process available in additive manufacturing today,” said Prucha.

The company was founded in 2015 and is led by alumni from Google and Apple. Investors include Floodgate, DCM, Mandra Capital, Haystack, Stanford University, and Joe Montana. 

Origin has continually been moving forward with new projects to include the development of new materials, forays into areas like footwear, and ongoing hardware development. What do you think of this news? Let us know your thoughts! Join the discussion of this and other 3D printing topics at 3DPrintBoard.com.

[Source / Images: Origin]

The post Origin to Begin Shipping New Industrial 3D Printer, the Origin One appeared first on 3DPrint.com | The Voice of 3D Printing / Additive Manufacturing.

3DEXPERIENCE Modeling & Simulation Conference: Keynote by Skunk Works & Executive Roundtable

Last week, Dassault Systèmes, the 3DEXPERIENCE software company, held the 3DEXPERIENCE Modeling & Simulation Conference in Michigan. I was invited to attend the event, which was held from September 18-19 at the Suburban Collection Showplace in Novi.

At the first plenary session, keynote speaker Clifton Davies, a Principal Aeronautical Engineer for Lockheed Martin Skunk Works, talked about the defense contractor’s use of the 3DEXPERIENCE platform, and its simulation process and design exploration apps, to work on aircraft design for the non-proprietary EXPEDITE project.

Skunk Works began working with the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) on the EXPEDITE project in 2017. According to ESTECO, EXPEDITE, which stands for EXPanded MDO for Effectiveness Based DesIgn TEchnologies, is the latest in a series of successful AFRL programs with a goal of advancing “the state-of-the-art of Multi-disciplinary Analysis and Design Optimization (MADO)” for USAF programs. The project aims to rapidly improve early conceptual MDO capabilities for the aerospace industry in several areas, including Effectiveness-Based Design (EBD), high-performance computing, and cost and reliability.

“Whatever your business process is, there’s a good chance it needs high-performance computing,” Davies said.

He explained what EXPEDITE was currently working on, stating that efficiency and support of higher fidelity physics are necessary for the tasks, which included next generation mobility, next generation UAS, and high-speed systems.

In terms of delivering EBD to customers, Davies said that the most important aspect to keep in mind is not how fast or far it can go, but if it finished the job in an affordable way. He said the design process needs to be taken “down into the statistics” to find the answer.

Davies continued, “What’s the probability it can complete the mission?”

Skunk Works wanted to make sure that risk to the USAF was minimal for the project, and wasn’t sure if there was anyone in the MDO framework industry capable of handling it. So the company partnered with Dassault, and several other companies, to determine who could best address the particular challenges of EXPEDITE.

In terms of what the company is using on the 3DEXPERIENCE platform, the focus is mainly on MDO tools, such as SIMULIA.

“We’re leveraging SIMULIA apps for creating MDO workflows,” Davies said. “We built the aircraft design workflows for the program using the SIMULIA apps.”

3DEXPERIENCE platform implementations can vary from very large to very small. The EXPEDITE project set up the platform on multiple virtual machines in Palmdale, California and Fort Worth, Texas, so more work could be distributed to more locations.

Davies then showed a slide which illustrated the conceptual design workflow that Lockheed Martin uses for the aircraft elements it’s executing with 3DEXPERIENCE. It’s broken down into multiple activities, based on both where the project might be executed and by which group.

The company has also integrated the V5 version of Dassault’s CATIA software program, and even built on top of it due to “multiple customizations,” which is why the newest version of the software was not used. Because an adapter did not exist, the company had to connect CATIA via COM interface through a VBScript driver they wrote.

But the company really wanted an adapter, and Davies said that Dassault “really came through for us.”

“It [the adapter] supports the normal things you’d expect, but this also supports Macros, which lets you leverage your IP and capability with geometry to get out what you need to do,” Davies explained.

He said that one of the most useful features of the plugin that the CATIA team created for EXPEDITE is a Screen Capture capability: it allows users to see exactly where the process failed, which really helps to reduce run time.

Moving back to computing, Davies said that the next generation of super computers will offer plenty of flexibility in terms of the various 3DEXPERIENCE platforms users can visit.

Davies wrapped up by discussing the company’s lessons learned, next steps, and future needs in terms of 3DEXPERIENCE. He talked about how nice it was to be able to load design data without having to leave the platform, in addition to being able to compare designs in tabular and graphical form, apply constraints, and having opportunities to streamline the user’s post-processing experience.

In closing, Davies said that he encourages Dassault Systèmes to “continue improving ergonomics for debugging models, best practices for large model distribution,” and the overall user experience.

Next up, PLM expert Dr. Michael Grieves, Chief Scientist for Advanced Manufacturing at the Florida Institute of Technology and the father of the digital twin, came onstage to speak for a few minutes before moderating the executive roundtable.

“We’re doing a lot of exciting things,” Dr. Grieves said.

“What I want to talk about is the digital twin – the model I developed.”

He talked about how in the 21st century, we developed 3D models and created a virtual space filled with virtual products – a big change from years past.

“At the beginning, we actually have a digital twin before we have the physical thing,” Dr. Grieves explained. “We really have this digital information that we work on. I like to design, test, make, and support the product virtually, and only when I get it all right do I want to make physical things. Ideally, I’d really like to print it – I think additive manufacturing is really going to change how we manufacture things.”

Then he referred back to the point that Davies had made early on – does the product do its job?

“If we can take the digital twin and test that to destruction, I have a better feel for the fact that it will perform the way it’s supposed to perform in the real world. Digital twins will save us a whole lot of resources,” Dr. Grieves said. “I should be able to predict failures and fix them before they happen.”

The way to do this, he explained, is by doing as much work as possible in advance on the virtual side.

“Industry 4.0 is talking about reducing the time of an event occurring to fixing it. I think about the digital twin as figuring out which events will occur and fixing them before they happen.”

With that, Dr. Grieves introduced the three speakers of the executive roundtable: Philippe Laufer, the CEO of CATIA; David Holman, Vice President R&D and Brand Leader for Dassault’s SIMULIA; and Garth Coleman, the VP of Marketing for Dassault’s ENOVIA.

Coleman was in definite agreement with Dr. Grieves’ thoughts on virtualization.

“We can do the modeling of the experience well before you have the product out in the world. We can innovate around that experience, and include the customer in that experience,” he stated.

“Once you have the real twin, you can connect that data in and refine the product, the experiences, everything.”

In this way, Coleman continued, companies can achieve cost savings, with maximum flexibility, early on in the process.

Then Dr. Grieves asked the experts how they felt about this kind of connectivity – how smart, connected products “fit in to what we do.” Coleman brought up the fact that the IoT and the IIoT are both “generating boatloads of data,” which is interesting for companies to have access to. But, he wondered if customers were using the features in the correct way.

“Being able to be in tune to all the trends and your finicky and satisfied customers is really important,” he said. “But what’s a great experience today – a better one may come along tomorrow.”

Holman chimed in here, stating that the digital twin is a good tool for success, as major challenges companies today face include the demand for increased customization and better quality.

“The only way to keep up is with the true 3DEXPERIENCE digital twin,” Holman said.

Dr. Grieves then asked Laufer for his opinion regarding the 3DEXPERIENCE digital twin.

“All signs show that we are changing the world,” he answered. “Experience is not at the level it should be, so it’s the time for the industry renaissance, and to have the citizen, consumer, and patient at the heart of the experience you’re creating.”

Industry Renaissance [Image: Dassault Systèmes]

Laufer brought up cars, and talked about simply riding in one versus the driving experience; for example, Laufer asked the audience members how many of us were satisfied with our car’s air conditioning. He mentioned that during a recent visit to Boeing, company representatives discussed the flight experience, as opposed to just delivering an airplane, and wanted to know why we weren’t all talking about the Industry Renaissance.

“The new book is the experience,” Laufer stated, quoting Dassault. “We are creating a 3DEXPERIENCE twin. In the virtual world, you can blow on it, push it, pull it.”

Dr. Grieves asked him how we can help customers “bridge the gap” between the physical and virtual worlds. Laufer explained that companies are using cyber systems to create these experiences, and that we have to be able to create, master, and model those systems – after all, when you want to make music, you must first practice the scales. In most companies, a designer creates the concept for a product and passes it on to the analyst engineer, who then runs simulations and sends it back for the changes to be made. The 3DEXPERIENCE platform is able to streamline all of these processes.

He asked, “How can you automate if you don’t do it properly in an interactive way?”

Dr. Grieves then brought up how generative design is tied into manufacturing, since we need to be able to create new shapes, and asked Coleman how he feels that it “plays into the classic bill of materials and collaboration.”

“From the ENOVIA side, this is a common thing that everyone wants to achieve – this lack of productivity,” he answered. “The common metric that comes back is 30% – what would you do with 30% of your time back?

“The bill of materials can’t keep up now, it’s too static, it’s too slow,” Coleman continued. “You can’t stimulate and optimize this. So it’s really a report of where you’re at – basically a 2D drawing.”

Turning to Holman, Dr. Grieves asked him where simulation fit.

“Basically, we can provide the tools, the manpower, the signers, and the innovators to build products that behave the way they are intended. This is what we’re bringing together with generative design,” Holman answered.

“In the end, the products we create have to deliver the right experiences to the customers, they have to be sustainable.”

Dr. Grieves then asked Coleman his perspective of where he thought everything in the discussion fit in.

“Requirements are driving everything, including what you do in modeling and simulation,” he said. “A lot of times, these are managed in emails, sticky notes, documents, Excel files, so on. Traditionally, we can do file management, and we do it well. But we need to move past this and start managing the innovation. Extract the important information as data, and connect it.”

Laufer then had the chance to share his views on the matter.

“The challenge engineering teams face is you have a problem in front of you – the topic is to optimize several KPI. How do you model in your current system? We have a way in the platform to follow KPIs while you’re designing and simulating to make sure you’re going in the right direction. This solution will augment the engineering teams by allowing them to explore, and simulate.

“I’m heavily using David’s technology in my CATIA applications,” Laufer continued. “Your role as an engineering team will be to explore, simulate, and optimize – the geometry, material composition, material selection, manufacturing process. This is what the future of engineering is about. The 3DEXPERIENCE platform provides this integrated environment that lets stakeholders of these decisions play together. 3DEXPERIENCE is multidisciplinary.”

Finally, Dr. Grieves asked each participant what the most important takeaway from the discussion was for the audience to understand. Holman stated that SIMULIA was making some strong investments in order to fulfill the promise of making high fidelity simulation more accessible, which “is gong to be great for all of you.” Coleman explained that ENOVIA is working to optimize things at the business process level, as it concerns “organizing and orchestrating all of this, and being able to modify the plan.”

Laufer said, “Speaking to you as users, your job will evolve. Simulation experts will be able to modify mesh, and work with the designer to propose alternatives. I think there’s going to be a fusion, but don’t be afraid of that.”

Stay tuned for more news from my time at the recent 3DEXPERIENCE Modeling & Simulation Conference!

Discuss this story and other 3D printing topics at 3DPrintBoard.com or share your thoughts in the Facebook comments below.

[Photos by Sarah Saunders]

The post 3DEXPERIENCE Modeling & Simulation Conference: Keynote by Skunk Works & Executive Roundtable appeared first on 3DPrint.com | The Voice of 3D Printing / Additive Manufacturing.

3D Printing News Briefs: August 3, 2019

For this edition of 3D Printing News Briefs, we’re starting off with a celebration – Scansite created 3D printed replicas of the spacesuit that Neil Armstrong wore for the 50th anniversary of the moon landing. Moving on to business and metals, 3D Hubs has hired a new Managing Director for the US, and DigiFabster published a case study. IAM 3D HUB’s newest technological partner is ArcelorMittal, and finally, SmarTech Publishing released some new research on metal powder bed fusion.

Scansite Creates 3D Printed Replicas of Famous Spacesuit

Just over 50 years ago last month, Neil Armstrong became the first man to walk on the moon, and people around the world have been celebrating this important anniversary. In 2015, the Smithsonian National Air & Space Museum launched a Kickstarter campaign to conserve, preserve, and digitize Armstrong’s spacesuit from that fateful day; this year, to commemorate the anniversary, the museum contacted Scansite to create 15 extremely faithful replicas of the suit for its 50th celebration of the moon landing. The interactive, life-sized “Apollo at the Park” replicas were made to display at 15 MLB ballparks around the US, together with an augmented reality app so visitors can learn important facts about the Apollo 11 moon mission.

“Baseball parks are the perfect venues for new generations to learn more about that summer night on July 20, 1969. The spacesuit replicas allow us to bring a piece of Apollo to Americans everywhere,” said Ellen Stofan, director of the National Air and Space Museum.

Scansite conducted high resolution 3D scanning of the original spacesuit, which was tricky because it features many details and different materials. The company used both a Breuckmann structured light scanner and a Faro touch probe to acquire the scan data, which resulted in a file with over 5.3 gigabytes of data. The data was edited, using surrounding topology of each hole in the information as a guide to fill everything in, and Scansite created a full-scale 3D print of the spacesuit, in 16 separate panels, on a Voxeljet 3D printer out of porous acrylic material. The sections were glued together to create the master model, which was then used to make a mold; finally, each replica was hand-sanded and painted, finished with a tough, autobody clear coat, and mounted on an engraved granite base.

3D Hubs Names Robert Schouwenburg as US Managing Director

Online manufacturing marketplace 3D Hubs announced that Robert Schouwenburg, the former COO & CTO of Shapeways, will be joining the company as its Managing Director for the USA. The company recently announced an $18 million funding round, which it’s been using to expand its team in the US, including opening a new North American headquarters at Chicago’s mHUB. Schouwenburg has over 20 years of experience in the industry, and will be working with the Chicago team to better service the company’s North American customer base, in addition to expanding 3D Hubs’ CNC machining services offering in Chicago.

“We’re at the start of ‘industry 4.0,’ an era when automation and data exchange will accelerate manufacturing technologies, and 3D Hubs is uniquely positioned to become a leader in this upcoming industrial revolution,” stated Schouwenburg.

DigiFabster Helps MakeItQuick Lower Costs and Increase Revenue

3D printing software and services provider DigiFabster recently released a case study about its customer MakeItQuick, a UK 3D printing service bureau. DigiFabster helps machine shops and service bureaus like MakeItQuick generate more new revenue, while lowering the cost of labor-intensive activities such as order entry, project management, and quoting. MakeItQuick teamed up with DigiFabster not long after it launched, and quickly started seeing results – the company was able to reduce quoting costs by up to 95% and order transaction costs by up to 85%. This allowed MakeItQuick to scale quickly and grow their revenues by 25% a month.

“The software handles 90% of our quotes without the need to manually review every part that is submitted. The time savings were immediately evident,” said Marco Massi, the owner of MakeItQuick.

“We save even more once a quote is confirmed. All the order details are at hand, giving us the opportunity to analyze the data and decide on the best way forward.

“In less than a year with DigiFabster, our revenue has grown steadily. We’re now experiencing a 25% monthly revenue increase, paving the way for our future success.”

IAM 3D HUB’s New Technological Partner

The latest technological partner of AM technology incubator IAM 3D HUB is ArcelorMittal, one of the world’s top steel and mining companies. The company, which has a presence in 60 countries and an industrial footprint in 18, will support the Barcelona-based hub with its technologies, materials, and knowledge to allow for new applications of and metal materials for 3D printing. The two share similar objectives, but ArcelorMittal hopes to use its experiences to contribute a new point of view.

ArcelorMittal’s membership in IAM 3D HUB will allow it to develop new metal 3D printing materials, as well as leverage the hub’s end-to-end solutions platform and work with stakeholders. By incorporating this company, the hub is welcoming a new member in the value chain of 3D printing “as a material developer.” It joins technological developers like HP, Renishaw, and Wacker Chemie, strategic partner Fira de Barcelona, and post-processing specialist Abrast by Coniex.

SmarTech Publishing: New Research Note on Metal Powder Bed Fusion

Less than a year ago, 3DPrint.com’s owner, 3DR Holdings, acquired an interest in industry analysis firm SmarTech Markets Publishing, and we continue to have a great relationship. If you’re ever interested in reading the firm’s latest data reports or market studies, you can find them all under the Research tab on our home page. Speaking of research, SmarTech’s VP of Research Scott Dunham, who has prepared the company’s Additive Manufacturing with Metal Powders Report for the last five years, recently released a research note on metal powder bed fusion, titled “Who Will Win (and Who Will Lose) the Metal PBF Marathon?”

“Despite what headlines, technologists, and marketing executives would have you believe, the metal 3D printing “race” is a marathon, not a sprint. To continue with the metaphor, we’re probably in about mile 10 of the race today –certainly not at the beginning anymore, but also quite a long way from the end. We are now about twenty three years since the first commercial metal powder bed fusion (PBF) systems came into view,” Dunham wrote.

“With so many closely comparable suppliers of metal PBF equipment now vying for market share, this begs the question, who has what it takes to make it? Everyone in the race today is working toward similar visions of an “Industry 4.0” future that hinges on metalworking going fully digital and highly automated from end to end, from prototyping all the way up to scaled production, with varying levels of customization capabilities based on industry needs along the way.”

Dunham goes on to list some of the technology’s “standout traits,” and names the company’s predictions on how the metal PBF race will turn out: which companies will be the front runners (EOS, GE Additive, Trumpf).

To learn more, check out SmarTech’s recently published “Powder Bed Fusion Markets, A Metal Additive Manufacturing Market Analysis.”

Discuss these stories and other 3D printing topics at 3DPrintBoard.com or share your thoughts below. 

The post 3D Printing News Briefs: August 3, 2019 appeared first on 3DPrint.com | The Voice of 3D Printing / Additive Manufacturing.