Janne Kyttanen on Creativity in 3D Printing

Janne Kyttanen is a whirlwind of innovation, ideas and designs. The pioneering 3D printing designer was one of the first to couple design and 3D printing, the first to sell 3D printed design goods and is a leader in creativity in our space. Janne thinks that we need more creativity in 3D printing. Previously we interviewed Janne whose also the nicest VC in the world on investing in 3D printing, we had him on for our 3DPod podcast as well and we have another interview with him here on his own background in 3D printing. Yes, we’re huge fans of Janne and his work here and we thought we’d let him shine a light on creativity as well.

So why is creativity important? 

Without creativity, you simply won’t be able to come up with anything new.

Should companies all be creative? Even in space or medical device?

All areas require creativity.

How does creativity help my bottom line? 

Many mathematical models can be created for this how it helps your bottom line, but in my articles, I am using a basic correlation between starting a company with “an idea” to what that idea is worth. All those metrics are well known and the reason why I am making the connection between creativity and starting a company, is because a disruptive idea for a startup pretty much boils down to creativity. No disrespect to cafes or bakeries for example, but if your startup idea revolves around starting a basic corner café, I don’t put that in the category of a creative startup, which could generate astronomical value. You have X amount of seats in a café and your café is open for X amount of time per day. The absolute maximum revenue your café is able to generate is already pre-defined. I put that kind of company in the bucket of “innovation”…aka an incremental improvement to what is already known.

Should everyone in the organization be more creative or should we have key creative people?

Everybody should be creative in their roles. Even creative accountants. On top of that, every organization should have a chief creative officer, who is accountable for measurable creative throughput.

I think design thinking is for idiots. I don’t take a two-day first aid course and then apply “medical thinking” to my business nor do I then think I can do what a doctor does. Please don’t tell me you’ve gone over to the design thinking dark side? 

I am not talking about design thinking here. Where most companies go wrong is in change management and implementation. You can hire a “design thinking” guru to give a lecture to your staff and after that lecture, everybody will think: that was interesting and they return back to doing what they were going 30 minutes ago. If proper metrics are not put in place, nothing will stick.

Why is it difficult for large companies to innovate? 

Innovation is fairly straight forward for companies, but due to a large amount of red tape, even changing small things, gets difficult. I am really referring to creativity here, which is practically impossible for companies if they don’t even have people in the ranks who are accountable for results. Companies think, it all somehow magically happens, but what is more magical is that your star people are using your money and resources in order to work on their own business under your watch, whilst they can do their existing job with their left hand. Recipe for disaster.

3D printed metal sofa

Sofa so Good Fully functional lounger coated in high polish copper and chrome by Janne Kyttanen

How can I innovate better? 

Read my Forbes article. Download the 6 step printout. Sticker it on your fridge and you are onto a flying start.

Isn’t lack of innovation a lack of budget and responsibility? 

It’s a lack of intelligence.

Which teams should innovate? 

Whether you are an accountant or lawyer, you can always innovate on how to do your job more effectively.

If everyone starts innovating will we be able to keep to our processes in check? 

Voila…and there comes the chief creative officer who is the gatekeeper. If you don’t have it in place, all ideas just circulate in the air and nobody is catching them.

How do we know we’re on the right track with our innovations? 

Nobody really knows before you start, but the trick is to implement it in your system and start building metrics behind it.

Won’t innovations lead to lots of silly side projects and trial balloons? 

Yes. Such things as the internet, the computer, the relativity theory, the wheel, the satellite or electricity.

Won’t it be expensive to innovate?

It is far more expensive to run out of business.

The post Janne Kyttanen on Creativity in 3D Printing appeared first on 3DPrint.com | The Voice of 3D Printing / Additive Manufacturing.

3D printing meets felt in new additive manufacturing technique

A really cool fabric gets an even cooler upgrade.

via dezeen

Acoustic panels and other architectural elements can be made in complex 3D forms using a robotic needle felting process developed by researchers at the Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning in the US.

Wes McGee, Tsz Yan Ng and Asa Peller liken their process to 3D printing, or additive manufacturing, because it also involves the digitally engineered layering of material.

Read more!

Enabling the Future: 3D Printed Frog Arm Prosthetic for Epilepsy Patients

While there is always the question of whether life imitates art, or vice versa, science and innovation today often imitate nature—and we humans seem to be getting better at it. A recent case and point involve a new e-NABLE prosthetic called the Frog Arm, developed by e-NABLE designer and volunteer, Peter Binkley.

Most of us take the ability to open our hands and flex our fingers completely for granted. For kids with severe epilepsy who have undergone difficult treatments, however, this can be impossible.

Upon discovering the enormous challenges kids with epilepsy face, Binkley began working with the Brain Recovery Project to create a functional limb replacement for children dealing with life after hemispherectomies—a surgery removing a portion of the brain’s hemisphere to help prevent dangerous seizures.

“In early 2016, I was approached by the Brain Recovery Project. They wanted me to pick up on Elizabeth Jackson’s amazing Airy Arm project. Elizabeth created a wearable arm that allowed a user to open his paralyzed fingers. They wanted something with a similar action. That is, a wearable device that opens the fingers via an extension of the elbow. The BRP wanted me to design a more low-profile, easy-to-wear solution. In September, I began sketching ideas for the Frog Arm,” states Binkley.

“Frog Hand (Frog Arm 0.1) would have been too difficult to manufacture. And I hadn’t even met a test pilot for the device yet, so I had a lot to learn.”

He met with his ‘test subject’ Cameron a few times, noting her exceptional social and academic skills despite the extreme medical treatments she had to endure. Soon after taking measurements and considering the level of functionality required in the prosthetic, Binkley created a 3D printed prototype accentuated with leather, screws, and a variety of cables:

“I was trying to make a device that could give users control of the wrist. With paralyzed tendons, flexing the wrist extends the fingers and extending the wrist flexes the fingers. I was trying to use that biomechanical fact to advantage. Large hair elastics hold the wrist in extension, so the normal position of the hand is closed. When the user extends the elbow, it pulls a cable that flexes the wrist, thereby opening the fingers.”

Numerous iterations were required for version 0.2, so Binkley moved on to the Frog Arm 0.3, using a 3D model and 3D printed forming blocks for better hinge design. He was forced to keep on editing his designs though, moving from 0.3 to 0.4 quickly also:

“The leap from version 0.3 to 0.4 was a big one. I had to attach directly to the fingers somehow. It seemed to me that Cameron’s only needed to be able to actively open her fingers, since they close on their own and remain closed at rest,” said Binkley.

Binkley used an elbow hinge for manipulating the cable, along with nylon tubing to serve as a braking system—allowing the fingers to move ‘relative to the carpals but not bound to the forearm.’ Leather cots made of distressed goat hide were placed around the fingers also. The forearm was not a good fit, however, and Binkley forged ahead to version 0.5.

While Cameron continued to have issues with finger extension due to such long-term paralysis, Binkley decided to discourage regular wear of the device for her due to fear of physical damage. He is continuing to work with another test pilot though, and his experimental open-source design has been released for the Frog Arm on Thingiverse.

e-NABLE has made a huge impact around the world in creating prosthetics for individuals of all ages in need of limb replacement. While these medical devices are meant to add to the quality of life for patients, many of the designs are spectacular—from those meant to help kids play violin to integrating complex features like parametrics, and even adding to veterinary medicine with bird prosthetics.

What do you think of this news? Let us know your thoughts! Join the discussion of this and other 3D printing topics at 3DPrintBoard.com.

[Source / Images: Enabling the Future]

The post Enabling the Future: 3D Printed Frog Arm Prosthetic for Epilepsy Patients appeared first on 3DPrint.com | The Voice of 3D Printing / Additive Manufacturing.

Promoting Additive Manufacturing: GE Additive Lichtenfels Facility Opening Celebrated in Bavaria

While GE Additive continues to make enormous strides in 3D printing and additive manufacturing, they continue to procure large facilities around the globe for production too. Now, they are adding a 40,000-square meter facility in Lechtenfels, Bavaria as a response to growing customer demand for AM technology.

The ultra-modern campus will be called GE Additive Lichtenfels, allowing progressive clients to make the transition to 3D printing, AM techniques, and lean manufacturing overall. The site will also house the GE Additive Concept Laser team. Opening ceremonies were officiated by Bavarian Minister of Sciences Bernd Sibler, along with a mix of GE business partners and politicians.

“In Bavaria, global players find exceptional conditions for successful and future-forward investments to take to the world. The opening of the new GE Additive Lichtenfels facility in Upper Franconia is one such example,” said Bavarian Minister of Sciences Bernd Sibler. “It is a great win for the people in the region and there many valuable opportunities for business and science to cooperate. The future of the additive manufacturing industry is being shaped in Lichtenfels.”

There will be 700 employees working at GE Additive Lichtenfels, and a recent press release from GE Additive states that ‘transition in production’ is already underway, with the office area still under construction but slated to be finished next year—at which time the Concept Laser teams will be moving.

“Today is great milestone for GE Additive, for Frank and Kerstin Herzog and the entire Concept Laser family,” said Jason Oliver, President & CEO of GE Additive. “There has been a lot of interest in the building over the past three years, both locally and from our customers. We want this modern, Lean manufacturing production facility, here in Bavaria, to become a global focal point for the additive industry.

Oliver also noted that while the new lean manufacturing facility is meant to be a central point for AM processes, their mission has been to create a ‘collaborative environment’ for both clients and teams. GE Additive also makes a good working environment a priority—beginning in the early planning stages.

“GE Additive Concept Laser is a pioneer and world-class in 3D printing,” said Bavarian Prime Minister Dr. Markus Söder. “The new campus in Lichtenfels is a technology and job motor for industry 4.0 in Upper Franconia. Technological leadership in rural areas, large industrial investments throughout the state – that is hightech made in Bavaria.”

GE Additive Lichtenfels inauguration ribbon cutting. From Left: Heidrun Piewernetz (District President Oberfranken), Andres Hügerich (Mayor of Lichtenfels), Debbra Rogers (Chief Customer Officer, GE Additive), Jason Oliver (President & CEO, GE Additive), Christian Meißner (District Chife Executive Lichtenfels), Kerstin and Frank Herzog (Founder of Concept Laser), Bernd Sibler (Staatsminister fur Wissenschaft und Kunst, Bayern) and Emmi Zeulner (Member of German Federal Parliament). (Photo: GE Additive, GEADPR025)

GE Additive has been a powerhouse when it comes to 3D printing and additive manufacturing, with numerous sites and facilities opened around the world from Pennsylvania to Munich, even to include a customer experience center. They have also expanded their Arcam EBM Center recently.

GE Additive includes additive machine providers Concept Laser and Arcam EBM; along with additive material provider AP&C.

GE Additive Lichtenfels campus inside.
(Photo: GE Additive, GEADPR025, image credit Wilm Visuals)

What do you think of this news? Let us know your thoughts! Join the discussion of this and other 3D printing topics at 3DPrintBoard.com.

GE Additive Lichtenfels campus outside.
(Photo: GE Additive, GEADPR025, image credit Wilm Visuals)

[Source / Images: GE Additive]

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Fusion 360 tutorial – Glasses Frames #MonsterM4SK via @ecken

Back with another tutorial, this time a frame for glasses (or a PCB with animated eyes). In this tutorial we’ll take a look at creating a frame for glasses or the Adafruit Monster M4SK. I use the loft featuring to seamlessly blend two surfaces together. The trick is to use tangent profiles!

Adafruit Monster M4SK
https://www.adafruit.com/product/4343

Monster M4SK Case Learn Guide
https://learn.adafruit.com/monster-mask-case/

Project Video

3D Printing Projects Playlist:

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Layer by Layer CAD Tutorials Playlist:

Timelapse Tuesday Playlist:

Enter the 2020 Additive Manufacturing Strategies Startup Competition

February 11th through 12th 2020 will see another Additive Manufacturing Strategies Event in Boston. A small scale summit-like event for industry leaders specific to the metal printing and medical 3D printing market these events bring together and educate a select number of highly interested professionals. Additive Manufacturing Strategies events are focused on professionals implementing 3D printing in manufacturing and production for metals, dental and medical.

As a part of this event, VC Fund Asimov Ventures will once again be hosting a startup competition. This competition will see you:

  • Apply to compete for a $15,000 investment from VC fund Asimov Ventures.
  • The winning company will be profiled on 3DPrint.com.

The timeline of the Competition is:

  • Deadline: December 1, 2019
  • Interviews: December 2-9, 2019
  • Selections Announced: December 15, 2019
  • Competition Date: February 11, 2020

The rules are:

  1. Applications must be submitted by December 1, 2019
  2. In order to compete you must be available to pitch in-person February 11, 2019, in Boston, MA (travel not provided)
  3. If selected to compete you will receive a free conference pass to Additive Manufacturing Strategies.
  4. Please note that due to the overwhelming number of submissions we receive only companies which are selected will be contacted
  5. Revenue cannot be greater than $500,000
  6. Software, Hardware, Materials and Bioprinting focus is welcome

Apply Here.

Home Page

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8mm Film Scanner #piday #raspberrypi @Raspberry_Pi #3DPrinted

NewImage

Via Hackaday:

There is a treasure trove of history locked away in closets and attics, where old shoeboxes hold reels of movie film shot by amateur cinematographers. They captured children’s first steps, family vacations, and parties where [Uncle Bill] was getting up to his usual antics. Little of what was captured on thousands of miles of 8-mm and Super 8 film is consequential, but giving a family the means to see long lost loved ones again can be a powerful thing indeed.

That was the goal of [Anton Gutscher]’s automated 8-mm film scanner. Yes, commercial services exist that will digitize movies, slides, and snapshots, but where’s the challenge in that? And a challenge is what it ended up being. Aside from designing and printing something like 27 custom parts, [Anton] also had a custom PCB fabricated for the control electronics. Film handling is done with a stepper motor that moves one frame into the scanner at a time for scanning and cropping. An LCD display allows the archivist to move the cropping window around manually, and individual images are strung together with ffmpeg running on the embedded Raspberry Pi. There’s a brief clip of film from a 1976 trip to Singapore in the video below; we find the quality of the digitized film remarkably good.

Learn more!


3055 06Each Friday is PiDay here at Adafruit! Be sure to check out our posts, tutorials and new Raspberry Pi related products. Adafruit has the largest and best selection of Raspberry Pi accessories and all the code & tutorials to get you up and running in no time!

Envisiontec 3D-Bioplotter: New Bioprinting Capabilities

The 3D-Bioplotter from EnvisionTEC has been at the heart of over 333 scientific papers, from 3D printing human tissue to 3D printing an ovary for mouse implantation. It is one of the most commonly used (and earliest) 3D bioprinters in the industry for tissue engineering and biofabrication research.

Now, the global provider of professional-grade 3D printing solutions is expanding the bioprinting capabilities of their star product just in time for the European Society for Biomaterials (ESB) Annual Conference in Dresden, Germany. Launched in 2000, the 3D-Bioplotter is probably one of the most seasoned bioprinters in the market, and now it’s getting two new print head options that will help advance biomaterial research.

Researcher using EnvisionTEC 3D-Bioplotter

The first is an upgrade of the Photo-Curing head, now allowing up to five wavelengths or combinations thereof during one project. The second is an Ink-Jet Low-Temperature head designed to dispense materials through a non-contact process.

One of the several solidification processes available to 3D-Bioplotter customers is photo-curing. According to EnvisionTEC, while the wavelength of 365 nanometers (nm) remains the most commonly required by photoinitiators used by academic and industrial users, this wavelength has a negative impact on cell survivability during prolonged or repeated use, especially in the research field of bioprinting.

Therefore, the company sought out a way to solve this need to shift towards photoinitiators that react to the visible light range, to which cells can be exposed to with minimal biological effect.

To avoid the constant manual exchange of light sources when using different materials, as well as to allow combinations of photoinitiators, EnvisionTEC came up with an upgrade for their machine, a multi-wavelength pen upgrade which now provides five wavelengths into one single source pen. Through the 3D-Bioplotter software, individual wavelengths, or combinations thereof, are user-selectable and can be assigned to individual parts.

Current customers with existing photo-curing heads can have their existing heads upgraded to allow the use of the new source pens. The wavelengths included are 365, 385, 395, 405 and 455 nm.

The firm’s second highlight, the Ink-Jet Low-Temperature head, is aimed at dispensing low viscosity hydrogels as coatings while 3D printing parts or for hybrid scaffold fabrication. The key is that the built-in microdispensing valve can be controlled through the software to dispense individual, unconnected dots of material, or to connect them into lines of dispensed droplets.

With a 100 micron aperture, this head is restricted to low viscosity materials, such as hydrogels. Additionally, all components in contact with the dispensing material can be autoclaved, allowing for cell-suspensions to be dispensed as well. And depending on the choice of materials, the Ink-Jet head can be used to create fast dot printing projects, to dispense materials in specific positions on the platform (organ-on-a-chip projects), to fill pores in hybrid scaffolds, or to dispense coatings onto simultaneously printed 3D scaffolds.

EnvisionTEC states that the whole cartridge mount is heatable, from a room temperature range of up to 70 degrees centigrades, in order to keep the materials in the cartridge at their proper processing temperatures. Also, this head was designed to use 10 ml cartridges but also fits 3 ml disposable cartridges, with a dispensing duration of between 0.4 ms to 100 ms, and a frequency range of 1-100 Hz.

The 3D-Bioplotter

The 3D-Bioplotter family of printers consists of three models: the Starter series, the Developer series and the Manufacturer series, each with increasing capabilities. The original 3D-Bioplotter is now in its fourth generation, and more than 15 years of hardware and software development have gone into it.

One of the frequent users of the 3D-Bioplotter, Teja Guda, Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering at the University of Texas at San Antonio, said recently that “what’s so unique about the printer is that it is capable of printing living cells within the material as you print it.”

The modular 3D printer is easy to use while being capable of advanced research at the same time. The Bioplotter series prints with open-source biomaterials, using air or mechanical pressure to extrude them through a variety of syringes. Both new heads are currently on display in Dresden, at the EnvisionTEC booth, where attendees can see them in action and learn more about the research these new additions will make possible.

[Images: EnvisionTEC]

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Copenhagen: COBOD 3D Prints European Building Again in Just Three Days

A construction company originally created as a spinoff from Denmark’s 3D Printhuset to handle customer demand for 3D printing construction activities and the BOD2 3D printer, COBOD (Construction Building on Demand) is meant to handle large-scale projects. Now, the innovative company has duplicated their initial BOD construction in Copenhagen—but in a fraction of the time.

“When we printed the original BOD building on September 11 two years ago, we spent two months finalizing the 3D printing. This time it only took 3 days, or 28.5 hours to be precise. This is truly a milestone in the development of the 3D construction printing technology and documents a remarkable 20 times improvement in our productivity in just two years,” said Jakob Jørgensen, Head of Technology at COBOD.

“The much faster print time of this print reflects the improvements of our technology by using the new, and 10 times faster BOD2 printer and that we have learned a lot from the first time we 3D printed the building.”

Day 1: 5 hours into the re-print of The BOD, Europe’s first 3D printed building

Day 3 of the re-print of The BOD

Known as Europe’s first 3D printed building, COBOD originally spent two months on construction of the BOD. With second generation hardware at work, in the form of the BOD2, the team has performed a ‘re-print’ in a stunning three days, commemorating the September 11th production of their initial BOD construction in 2017.

This work not only shows the potential for 3D printing in the construction industry overall—as well as other applications—but also demonstrates the powerful increase in COBOD’s productivity.

COBOD had the attention of the 3D printing industry and enthusiasts from around the world as they delivered the first BOD2 3D printer to Belgian Kamp C, upon winning the Kamp C European tender. Later, in similar circumstances, they ended up delivering another BOD2 to The Technological University of Denmark (DTU), followed by shipment to the Middle East of what they contend is a printer able to complete the largest constructions so far—with fabrication possible of 300 sqm in 3 stories, for a total of 900 sqm of printed building.

“We have said time and time again, that this technology has great potential, is developing very fast and that there is still so much to be learned to fully utilize this technology. Today we provide the documentation for exactly that, by having 3D printed an identical building to The BOD building we did exactly two years ago,” said Henrik Lund-Nielsen, CEO of COBOD. “Although not everything went as well as expected, the results and improvements we achieved this time speaks for itself.”

And while COBOD has been on point over their short time in existence as a 3D printing supplier, they have an excellent track record; however, they also provide extensive documentation of their projects to their clients—and to the world—being clear about successes but also about what went wrong. Here, there were some complications in streamlining processes between the printhead, speed, and materials.

“We are extremely pleased with how well our new BOD2 printer performed during this test. The BOD2 3D construction printer has an impressive print speed of up to 100 cm/second, and during this print we could comfortably print with a speed of 35 cm/sec, which is faster than anybody before,” said Michael Holm, Head of R&D at COBOD. “However, our concrete mixer-pump could not continuously follow the printer at this speed, so for a lot of the print we actually had to slow down the printer to avoid running out of materials. Hence we are now working with our pump suppliers to overcome this barrier and truly utilize the full speed of our BOD2.”

Mistakes during the printing process included an error in setting time for the concrete, leading to clogging. Once production issues were corrected, the COBOD team reported that productivity doubled from printing 10 cm of the BOD building per hour to 20 cm on the last day.

“Again, we learned a lot from applying our technology to a project. We are now converting the lessons that we learned into even better solutions for our customers going forward,” concluded Henrik Lund-Nielsen. “Once we have done that, we believe we could 3D print the entire BOD building in just 8 hours, should we decide to print it again a third time. None the less, this re-print is a significant milestone. A milestone that documents the great potential of 3D construction printing.”

Re-printing The Bod with the new BOD2 printer also improved the smoothness and quality of the 3D printed walls

3D printing in construction continues to grow in popularity throughout Europe, the US, and extremely affluent realms like Dubai. What do you think of this news? Let us know your thoughts! Join the discussion of this and other 3D printing topics at 3DPrintBoard.com.

[Source / Images: COBOD]

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