Toolbox Creality #3DThursday #3DPrinting

Toolbox Creality by bobby1kenoby Thingiverse

Super handy tool caddy for your 3D printer, shared by bobby1kenoby on Thingiverse:

This is a toolbox for tools that comes with creality printers, includes a guide to cut Capricorn PTFE with a cutter blade

Download the files and learn more


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Every Thursday is #3dthursday here at Adafruit! The DIY 3D printing community has passion and dedication for making solid objects from digital models. Recently, we have noticed electronics projects integrated with 3D printed enclosures, brackets, and sculptures, so each Thursday we celebrate and highlight these bold pioneers!

Have you considered building a 3D project around an Arduino or other microcontroller? How about printing a bracket to mount your Raspberry Pi to the back of your HD monitor? And don’t forget the countless LED projects that are possible when you are modeling your projects in 3D!

Fiskars SW 84 hand saw handle #3Dprinting #3DThursday

Banners and Alerts and Fiskars SW 84 hand saw handle by Dragondrummer71 Thingiverse

Dragondrummer71 shared this project on Thingiverse!

Because the orignial handle on my Fiskars SW84 Saw was broken, I designed a similar as a replacement part.
In the model there are some small layer with material inside of the holes to print the handle without support and the holes can bridged.
After printing I have sanded the handle and the best way to drill the holes is to but the saw into the handle and then drill the holes.

See more!


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Every Thursday is #3dthursday here at Adafruit! The DIY 3D printing community has passion and dedication for making solid objects from digital models. Recently, we have noticed electronics projects integrated with 3D printed enclosures, brackets, and sculptures, so each Thursday we celebrate and highlight these bold pioneers!

Have you considered building a 3D project around an Arduino or other microcontroller? How about printing a bracket to mount your Raspberry Pi to the back of your HD monitor? And don’t forget the countless LED projects that are possible when you are modeling your projects in 3D!

Additive Industries & ArcelorMittal Using MetalFAB1 3D Printer to Make Spare Steel Parts

One of the world’s leading steel and mining companies, ArcelorMittal, is partnering with Dutch company Additive Industries to investigate the use of metal 3D printing to make large spare parts for the steel industry. Additive manufacturing is used to fabricate spare parts for plenty of applications and industries, including maritime, railways, the military, consumer appliances, automotive, and many more. It makes a lot of practical business sense, as 3D printing spare parts offers companies, like ArcelorMittal, flexibility, a reduced production cycle, and on-demand manufacturing; if this happens onsite, it can even save on shipping costs.

3D printed spare parts used in ArcelorMittal facilities: (A) Example of part consolidation application with 316L original part on the left and 3D printed part on the right; (B) example of functional large parts with internal lattice structure made with 316L above 500 mm; and (C) lightweight (hollow) functional spare parts made with Maraging Steel with ArcelorMittal’s optimized parameters.

By collaborating with Additive Industries on metal 3D printing over the last few years, and using the technology to build on-demand spare parts, ArcelorMittal has improved its quality and process performance – allowing the company to print large, complex components that are ready to use.

“Additive Manufacturing is an exponential technology, moving very fast. Our collaboration with Additive Industries is a clear demonstration of our ability to remain at the cutting-edge of this technology: we started by printing small specimens and have now progressed to large size and complex parts,” said Jose López Fresno, Head of the Additive Manufacturing department, ArcelorMittal Global R&D in Avilés, Spain.

Operations in the steelmaking industry require components, and spare parts, that must hold up under difficult conditions. In the beginning of the ArcelorMittal and Additive Industries collaboration, they had to figure out how best to achieve the necessary requirements for component size and quality. But over the last two years of working together, the two have achieved an up to fourfold increase in component size, in addition to improving their reliability and quality. This means that the steel company has been able to increase the amount of applications for its 3D printed spare parts from small size part consolidation to jobs that need complex, functional, large, and strong parts.

MetalFab1 on the day of installation in ArcelorMittal R&D facilities in Avilés.

Now, the two are looking at what metal 3D printing can do for the steel industry with the MetalFAB1 by Additive Industries, which is one of the market’s largest 4-laser metal AM systems.

“Innovation and market leader ArcelorMittal have helped us to stress-test our MetalFAB1 system for critical spare-part production,” stated Daan A.J. Kersten, Co-Founder and CEO Additive Industries. “This enabled us to expand our experience to the steel industry from our main application markets in aerospace and automotive. It has become clear that metal 3D printing is a serious alternative for a large variety of cast parts.”

First introduced back in 2015, the unique MetalFAB1 printer has a 420 x 420 x 400 mm build volume, which makes it possible to fabricate large steel spare parts for the mining and steelmaking industries. But at the same time, it also ensures high productivity because it automated the manual steps of regular powder bed fusion 3D printers; this, in turn, equals the lowest cost per 3D printed part.

The modular MetalFAB1 has multiple build chambers, up to four 500W lasers, and can be configured for up to 11 different modules for more productivity or post-processing automation. It’s also well-designed for safety, which is perfect for ArcelorMittal and its focus on operator safety. In addition, 3D printing spare parts can help reduce waste – meeting another of the company’s objectives in terms of environmental safety.

“We are proud to work together with ArcelorMittal, jointly driving the business case for 3D-printed parts in the steel industry,” said Harry Kleijnen, Key Account Manager for Additive Industries. “ArcelorMittal’s typical applications have enabled us to further adapt the MetalFAB1 system to print high density, high volume parts. We are looking forward to expanding the range of applications and materials in this intense and strong collaboration.”

Since the first MetalFAB1 3D printer was installed at ArcelorMittal’s R&D facilities, the company has already used several of the 3D printed spare parts. To see the assembly and installation of the MetalFAB1 at ArcelorMittal, check out Additive Industries’ video here.

Discuss this story and other 3D printing topics at 3DPrintBoard.com or share your thoughts in the Facebook comments below.

(Source/Images: Additive Industries)

The post Additive Industries & ArcelorMittal Using MetalFAB1 3D Printer to Make Spare Steel Parts appeared first on 3DPrint.com | The Voice of 3D Printing / Additive Manufacturing.

Luke Skywalker lightsaber – NO GLUE assembly #3Dprinting #3DThursday

Luke Skywalker s Lightsaber NO GLUE assembly by fedemartino Thingiverse

fedemartino shared this project on Thingiverse!

This is Luke Skywalker’s green lightsaber. I created this so that it can be fully assembled without using any glue. All parts are either screwed or clasped to assemble.

There are two different versions of the upper grip. One where each ring is a separate part and one where its a single piece.

If you need help understanding how to put it all together please contact me!

Download files: https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:4172706


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Every Thursday is #3dthursday here at Adafruit! The DIY 3D printing community has passion and dedication for making solid objects from digital models. Recently, we have noticed electronics projects integrated with 3D printed enclosures, brackets, and sculptures, so each Thursday we celebrate and highlight these bold pioneers!

Have you considered building a 3D project around an Arduino or other microcontroller? How about printing a bracket to mount your Raspberry Pi to the back of your HD monitor? And don’t forget the countless LED projects that are possible when you are modeling your projects in 3D!

Mega Fume Extractor / blower #3DThursday #3DPrinting

Mega Fume Extractor blower by sparus Thingiverse

DIY fume extractor shared by sparus on Thingiverse:

Made it for a Nidec 120mm fan (38mm). Probably won´t fit slimmer fans

Recommended Parts List:
2x 20/25mm M5 bolts
2X M5 washers
4x 10mm M3 bolt
4x M3 Nuts
8x 18mm M4 bolt

one small 3 position switch (if you want to use 2 speed) or small on/off Switch
The switch I used as a 6mm thread

Download the files and learn more


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Every Thursday is #3dthursday here at Adafruit! The DIY 3D printing community has passion and dedication for making solid objects from digital models. Recently, we have noticed electronics projects integrated with 3D printed enclosures, brackets, and sculptures, so each Thursday we celebrate and highlight these bold pioneers!

Have you considered building a 3D project around an Arduino or other microcontroller? How about printing a bracket to mount your Raspberry Pi to the back of your HD monitor? And don’t forget the countless LED projects that are possible when you are modeling your projects in 3D!

Dear Stratasys: We Need Thingiverse Not Face Shields

Dear Stratasys,

I’ve known you now for over 12 years. It was love at first sight when I saw my first 3D printer, a Stratasys Dimension 1200. I’ve admired the reliability, repeatability, and quality of your machines. Your founder Scott Crump is a personal hero of mine and meeting him a few times was a highlight of my life. As an organization, you’ve solidly been producing good machines for a long time now and I’ve always enjoyed working with Stratasys people in many different capacities over the years. We’ve now known each other since Wall-E and In Bruges came out, since we both saw the Beijing Summer Olympics and both danced to I Kissed a Girl and Just Dance. So I feel I can address you like an old friend. Know that this comes from love.

I’m super happy that you are making 11,000 face shields a week. I think that this can really help people by delivering a safe extra precaution for many. But, as notable and nice as this move is you could have a far more important role to play in battling COVID. You see, I’ll let you in on a secret, you own a website called Thingiverse. Thingiverse? Yes, you bought it years ago. Thingiverse is a website where people can download files to 3D print. Theoretically. I’m kidding, it works again, congrats! Of all the key 3D printing infrastructure in the world, Thingiverse is along with slicing software and Magics a core bit of functionality for the 3D printing community. Thingiverse is the one central tool that all of the makers and desktop 3D printing users use. We used to use it every day. It is still the largest 3D printing website in the world. Cool, right?

The really rad thing about Thingiverse is that it lets us all work together. So Mary the mechanical engineering genius could make a file, Petra could refine it and then everyone could use it. Thingiverse has the potential to make all of the world’s problems shallow. All of the things could be designed and shared on that site. This, in turn, would make 3D printing more valuable. If a problem has a thing as its solution, then potentially, this solution could be created, developed and shared on Thingiverse.

Now I totally understand that a lot of the stuff on Thingiverse is silly and perhaps not very well made. Most stuff on the internet is silly and not very well made. Generally, however, we consider the internet to be useful on the whole. Thingiverse is just such a utility. I use the word utility in a purposeful way. Thingiverse is infrastructure like electricity and water. And yet you have neglected Thingiverse. Treated it a bit like a parent who went out for a pack of cigarettes and never came back.

Thingiverse now has ads which is great. It also looks a lot slicker and works much better than before. So maybe compared to before you’re kind of a Christmas and summer holidays dad.

We’ve got hundreds of thousands of people at home now. They’re bored and want to help out. Hundreds of 3D printing firms worldwide are working on COVID related products and solutions. I know many of these are doubtful and risky. But, we can harness the power of the 3D printing community to share findings, solutions and make progress together. The core Thingiverse functionality is what people need right now to download and print files. By curating specific selections you could guide people to NIH and individual health and hospital authority approved files. Through challenges and laying out problems, you could channel our collective energy towards specific solutions.

Companies and makers are ready and willing to expend the effort. Most efforts are now focused on shields which is at least safer than some of the more dubious efforts out there. What is not happening, however, is a guided effort towards sterilization, safer products, real product development and real solving. You see everyone is just parroting things at the moment. “People need masks, let’s make those”. What is not happening is that the request by an individual doctor is getting solved. There is no clearinghouse for problems where people on the frontlines can ask for help. Instead healthcare people have to spend time on conference calls with helpful businesses. This is inefficient.

The most useful thing in the world right now is not a mask or a shield. The most useful thing in the world right now is place where problems are specified which can then be solved. Unique problems brought on by our current crisis could in some cases be solved by things. We as an industry are the shortest path to new things. We could collectively work on how to print safely, how to test parts, how to improve parts and how to really solve new problems. People on the frontlines could simply specify what part they need or what problem they have and our community could solve it. They could then do this in one central place where our collective experience could bring about better parts.

Unique solutions to unique problems is the thing which our technology excels at. Yet, where are the requests from the car side testing people to make an extender for their swabs so they don’t have to reach so far into the car? Where are the files for all of those press releases and articles? Where are the thousands of foot and hand door opener designs for every door? Why hasn’t someone come up with a DIY automatic door opener? Where are the hundreds of no-touch faucet designs? We’ve got thousands of engineers sitting at home in a race to finish Netflix, they can be deployed to solve specific problems affecting us all. Our energies are being wasted, channel them.

I know that I’ve previously spoken about first not doing harm. In this case, we need one central place where we know that the best and right files are to be found. We need one place where all of the possible files are submitted for review and scrutiny. We need a central source of truth for all of our decentralized efforts.

As an industry, we’ve gone from mass-producing press releases to mass-producing face shields. This is laudable. I’d rather have a shield to protect myself than a piece of content marketing, but still, this is not optimal. We have the potential to bring real change and make this world a better place. The clearest way for us as an industry actually solve COVID related problems is for one central place to act as a clearinghouse for ideas, problems, best practices, refinements, and solutions. The most likely place for this, indeed one that has almost all of the functionality already, is Thingiverse. I’m not saying that you have to stop making the face shields but maybe lavish some attention on your least favorite stepchild and have Thingiverse lead the charge on COVID?

11,000 face shields are nice but 11,000 solutions would be better.

The post Dear Stratasys: We Need Thingiverse Not Face Shields appeared first on 3DPrint.com | The Voice of 3D Printing / Additive Manufacturing.

Aprecia and Purdue University partner to advance 3D printed pharmaceuticals

Aprecia Pharmaceuticals, the company behind the first FDA approved 3D printed drug Spritam, has announced a partnership with Purdue University’s College of Pharmacy to advance the technology and science of 3D pharmaceutical printing. Their collaboration will focus on developing future 3D printed pharmaceutical equipment and medications. “Aprecia’s mission is to maximize and expand its 3DP […]

Easy Breath Face Mask anti Corona Filter Adapter #3Dprinting #3DThursday

Easy Breath Face Mask anti Corona Filter Adapter by Blixinator Thingiverse

Blixinator shared this project on Thingiverse!

This is a 3d printable breath filter adapter for use on the Decathlon Easy Breath Snorkel Mask. Filter.stl is the filter that replaces the original snorkel. Netz.stl is a net witch is wrapped tight around the filter to keeps the filtermaterial in place.

As filter material I tried two layers of papertowels or toiletpaper but any material can be used. Because of the big filter area it is possible to use very dense filter material. I don’t know what material is best as a filter against Corona Virus. Good thing is the fact, that you only breath in through the filter and out through the bottom valve of the mask, so the moisture form the breath is not wettening the filter material and the mask is never foggy.

Please stay healthy.

See more!


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Every Thursday is #3dthursday here at Adafruit! The DIY 3D printing community has passion and dedication for making solid objects from digital models. Recently, we have noticed electronics projects integrated with 3D printed enclosures, brackets, and sculptures, so each Thursday we celebrate and highlight these bold pioneers!

Have you considered building a 3D project around an Arduino or other microcontroller? How about printing a bracket to mount your Raspberry Pi to the back of your HD monitor? And don’t forget the countless LED projects that are possible when you are modeling your projects in 3D!

3D Hangouts – Thermal Camera and Temperature Monitor #3DPrinting #3DThursday

people working on COVID-19 efforts, they can order, and if it’s out of stock email: covid19@adafruit.com

https://learn.adafruit.com/open-source-face-shield-designs

Learn Guide: MLX90640 PyBadge Thermal Camera
https://learn.adafruit.com/mlx90640-thermal-image-recording

Shield Testing
https://docs.library.ucla.edu/display/LSD/COVID-19+Response%3A+3D+Printing+PPE+Equipment

Approved Designs
https://3dprint.nih.gov/collections/covid-19-response

Collection of Designs on Prusa Printers
https://www.prusaprinters.org/social/3814-adafruit/collections/16034

MX MIDI Guitar Learn Guide and Video
https://learn.adafruit.com/mx-midi-guitar/
https://youtu.be/BDwOBYsL71Q

Layer by Layer – MX MIDI Guitar
https://youtu.be/FQWXE8LRQzE

Download Face Shield V2 Fusion 360 Design
https://a360.co/2QG9TUP

CircuitPython Downloads: https://circuitpython.org/
https://www.youtube.com/adafruit/live #3DHangouts

3D Parts Library on GitHub
https://github.com/adafruit/Adafruit_CAD_Parts

Adafruit Face Shields
https://a360.co/2QG9TUP

Interactive Map https://getusppe.org/give/

Hackers Forum
https://www.hackthepandemic.org/
https://youtu.be/Sv2-kXnGyag?t=1914

Clinic Recommended Shields
https://www.designthatmatters.org/covid-19

One Sheet Info
https://twitter.com/craightonberman/status/1244787764379430912/photo/1

UCLA
https://docs.library.ucla.edu/display/LSD/COVID-19+Response%3A+3D+Printing+PPE+Equipment

Timelapse Tuesday:
Retractable Door Opener – Òscar Fri Gola
https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:4248606
https://youtu.be/HR31bkXqZ04


649-1
Every Thursday is #3dthursday here at Adafruit! The DIY 3D printing community has passion and dedication for making solid objects from digital models. Recently, we have noticed electronics projects integrated with 3D printed enclosures, brackets, and sculptures, so each Thursday we celebrate and highlight these bold pioneers!

Have you considered building a 3D project around an Arduino or other microcontroller? How about printing a bracket to mount your Raspberry Pi to the back of your HD monitor? And don’t forget the countless LED projects that are possible when you are modeling your projects in 3D!

The Adafruit Learning System has dozens of great tools to get you well on your way to creating incredible works of engineering, interactive art, and design with your 3D printer! If you’ve made a cool project that combines 3D printing and electronics, be sure to let us know, and we’ll feature it here!

Makerbot Method Has an Open Materials Platform, Mitsubishi, Kimya, Polymaker, BASF, Lehvoss and Jabil Join Alliance

Stratasys has announced that its Makerbot Method 3D Printer now has an Experimental Extruder that automagically turns it into an open materials printer. You can now buy a MakerBot LABS Experimental Extruder and then buy materials from Jabil, Polymaker, Kimya, Mitsubishi Chemical, LEHVOSS Group and BASF, Makerbot’s materials partners.

Johan-Till Broer, VP of Product Development, MakerBot said

“By transforming METHOD into an open materials platform, we provide our users with an incredibly powerful tool to realize their ideas. Engineers can now print a growing number of advanced third-party materials on an industrial 3D printing platform, which was designed to produce stronger and more accurate parts than competing desktop 3D printers. We have partnered with some of the best material companies in the industry to rapidly expand and diversify the materials portfolio for METHOD. With our partners and customers, we will explore the boundaries of what’s possible with METHOD to unlock new applications.”

Dr. Xiaofan Luo the CEO of  Polymake was quoted as saying

“With more synergy between material and machine we see a greater focus on the applications realized with 3D printing. High temperature materials provide a gateway to production-ready printed parts and the METHOD is the perfect platform to utilize them,”

The company touts its heated build chamber and own soluble support materials, sensors tracking temperature as key advantages of the printer. It also discloses that the new extruder can go to 300°C which could potentially unlock some rather interesting materials such as PA and perhaps even PEKK. Some of the new materials available through their alliance now include Polymaker PC, Jabil ESD safe PETg, Jabil TPE, Kimya ABS Carbon which has been loaded with 30% chopped carbon fiber, Kimya PETg carbon, and Mitsubishi Durabio which is a bio-based PC.

Makerbot’s rise was swift and the company pioneered desktop 3D printing. Its fall was almost as fast with serious engineering missteps, quality control issues accompanied by deep feelings of hate from many in our community. A significant portion of us will never really forgive Bre for his missteps and the fact that the firm turned its back on open source and even started patenting innovations made by its community. New owner Stratasys has now with the Method developed a credible printer, however. Will we ever love Makerbot again? I’m not sure, but we could use them at one point.

The Method works well and delivers good reliable results. Opening up that machine to a materials alliance should increase the number of materials available for the method. With better pricing and more manufacturing options the Method should be more useful. Just like Stratasys’ materials alliance for its industrial systems an “open materials” or “semi-open materials alliance” is a step away from control towards manufacturing. When manufacturing many suppliers and materials give you confidence and reduce vendor lock-in making it more likely that you’ll use that printer at scale. Whereas being completely open would be even better for end-users I applaud this move towards a more mature industry-ready 3D printing market.

 

 

The post Makerbot Method Has an Open Materials Platform, Mitsubishi, Kimya, Polymaker, BASF, Lehvoss and Jabil Join Alliance appeared first on 3DPrint.com | The Voice of 3D Printing / Additive Manufacturing.