Plumen & Batch.Works: 3D Printed Lampshade Collection Made from Recycled Plastic

3D printing has obviously done a lot of good in many of the major sectors of the world, like aerospace and medical. But, every once in a while, Plumen sneaks in to remind me that the technology is just as useful in the consumer goods market…and can also be just as sustainable.

The designer low energy lighting company, founded nearly a decade ago by Nicolas Roope and Michael-George Hemus, believes that the way to get people on board with energy efficient lighting is by providing them with attractive low energy light bulbs, and all the sustainable accessories that go with them, like lampshades.

Now, Plumen is collaborating with London-based design company Batch.works on a new range of lampshades, 3D printed out of recycled plastic from waste items like water bottles.

“When we first met Batch.works, it seemed like the perfect match. We’re both small businesses with a similar ethos and approach to things. The fact that you can use recycled plastics and they can then be industrially biodegraded or reused again is really fascinating to me, and plays into the circular economy – which we are trying to put into practice everywhere we can,” said Plumen co-founder Hemus.

“To Plumen, 3D-printing is a very exciting opportunity for lighting. 3D-printing allows shapes and forms that are not possible otherwise. More importantly, there is very little waste compared to traditional methods – products are made to order, from recycled plastic bottles and at the end of their lives they can be recycled once again. It’s a sustainable vision for the future.”

The collection’s first two 3D printed shades, Neo by Matthias Lauche and Ribbon by BOLD, were recently released, and are available to purchase from the online stores of both Plumen and Batch.works; more lampshades will be released in 2020.

Neo, based on geometric Art Deco forms, is for Plumen’s Milky Willow bulb, and features two shades stacked one on top of the other in order to frame the Plumen E27 pendant light. Because there are two parts to the Neo shade, it can be created in multiple color combinations.

The Ribbon shade has a more fluid surface, thanks to the capabilities of 3D printing, and bends over itself to, as Plumen explained in a press release, “surround and protect” its Milky Wilma bulb.

“The space created by the shade is filled with light, revealing and emphasising the different volumes created by the enveloping surface,” the release continues. “The vertical lines that run through the shade, combined with the horizontal layers that are characteristic of this manufacturing technique, amplify the appearance of a piece of textile that’s solidified around the light – directing it and enhancing it. Light peeks through the shade’s open space, allowing the iconic bulb to be seen from another angle.”

As part of the companies’ continuing commitment to reduce and reuse plastic, each of the 3D printed lampshades is fully recyclable. The shades are all made at Batch.works’ east London headquarters, as the company is also committed to local manufacturing, and are printed on-demand using filament from Amsterdam-based social enterprise Reflow, which also re-purposes plastics that would otherwise be wasted. Additionally, the shades can also be returned to Batch.works for recycling once they’ve reached the end of their lifespan.

“We believe that thinking more carefully about what materials are used, and how things are produced, is key to combating short-termism. That’s why this kind of collaboration is so promising. We believe 3D printing can be scaled to a wider variety of products, and become a practical manufacturing method for the future – and that’s what we want to achieve,” stated former architect Julien Vaissieres, who founded Batch.works in 2016 with a goal of making eco-friendly, affordable 3D printed products.

Batch.works created the Plumen lampshade collection with the help of five different design studios. Black and white are the currently the only available colors, though you can request custom ones, dependent on volume. The 3D printed Neo shade is £149, while the Ribbon is £199…a lot more than I’d typically spend on a lampshade, really, but I love that they are completely sustainable.

Discuss this story and other 3D printing topics at 3DPrintBoard.com or share your thoughts in the Facebook comments below. 

[Images provided by Urban Alps]

The post Plumen & Batch.Works: 3D Printed Lampshade Collection Made from Recycled Plastic appeared first on 3DPrint.com | The Voice of 3D Printing / Additive Manufacturing.

TU Dresden: CONPrint3D for Monolithic 3D Printing in Construction

Researchers from the Technische Universität Dresden have been exploring challenges within the construction industry. In their recently published paper, ‘Large-scale digital concrete construction – CONPrint3D concept for on-site, monolithic 3D printing,’ M. Krausea , J. Ottoa , A. Bulgakovb, and D. Sayfeddinec discuss additive manufacturing processes and their potential within the confines of today’s architecture and design.

In exploring how 3D printing and AM processes could positively impact the construction industry, the researchers consider the following:

  • Mechanical engineering
  • Concrete technology
  • Data management
  • Construction management

As advances occur, TU Dresden continues to rely on CONPrint3D® (Concrete ON-site 3D-Printing). This system offers:

  • Established machine technology
  • Production of fully filled concrete structures
  • Sustainable concrete formulations with a maximum grain size of up to 16 mm
  • Use directly on construction site

For this study, the researchers investigated greater optimization of concrete printing using the CONPrint3D®. Because the consensus is in, and the majority of experts within construction agree that 3D printing offers greater efficiency, affordability, and design potential the researchers give their attention to this more progressive form of technology; in fact, CONPrint3D® can show savings up to 25 percent and processes may be up to six times faster—in comparison to typical masonry.

“Compared to the stationary industry, the boundary conditions are completely different for computer-aided manufacturing in the construction industry. Changing environmental conditions (such as site location, subsoil characteristics or environmental impacts) makes it difficult to introduce automated production methods on site. The increasing digitization and establishment of new planning methods, such as Building Information Modelling (BIM), can ease the introduction of automated processes on construction sites,” state the authors.

“The optimization of the printing strategies is extremely relevant to ensure the efficiency of the process. The construction process is usually computer simulated before printing.”

Essential components of the concrete 3D printing process CONPrint3D®

Researchers at TU Dresden have been searching for ways to better construction processes since 2014. Development of CONPrint3D® has been promising because printing occurs on-demand at the construction site (in-situ concrete construction), it represents a construction machine ‘established on the market,’ and large, fully filled concrete structures are created.

Geometrically precise installation of the concrete by modified truck-mounted concrete pump

Path planning occurs, with consideration for the trajectory, constraints, speed, acceleration points, and more:

“When solving the problem of planning the trajectories of motion, sections of acceleration and braking of the printhead are provided. Planning of the trajectory is carried out in space and time, which ensures the passage of the printhead the nodal points of the working space at a given time period. The solution of the planning task is determined by the appointment of the robot, its kinematic characteristics, performed by the technological operation and the technical environment conditions.”

During the study, the researchers created new and adaptive 3D printing strategies for developing a new and continuous process chain, although neither their work in digital data preparation nor processing is ready yet.

“The aim of the international research project is to complete the digital process chain from BIM to machine-specific optimized G-Codes. At the Technical University of Dresden, research will continue to be carried out in order to achieve the goal of construction site application,” concluded the researchers.

Additive manufacturing has already offered an enormous boon to the construction industry overall, and especially with the versatility available in materials. And while this is a realm that is still evolving, construction 3D printers are being developed on a massive scale, and even for far-out tasks like construction in space. What do you think of this news?

Let us know your thoughts! Join the discussion of this and other 3D printing topics at 3DPrintBoard.com.

left: Approach of CONPrint3D® right: Extrusion of smaller concrete strands with round corners and subsequent concrete filling

[Source / Image: ‘Large-scale digital concrete construction – CONPrint3D concept for on-site, monolithic 3D printing’]

 

 

The post TU Dresden: CONPrint3D for Monolithic 3D Printing in Construction appeared first on 3DPrint.com | The Voice of 3D Printing / Additive Manufacturing.

Filament Spool Winding Handle #3DPrinting #3DThursday

Featured preview Winder4

moXDesign shared this project on Thingiverse!

This winding handle can be fitted to the side of an empty filament spool which can then be used to hold filament samples. The handle makes it easier to spin the spool and wind the filament into place.

Drill a 10mm hole in the filament spool making sure that the handle, when fitted, will be inside the diameter of the spool. You may need to make the hole slightly larger to fit the spindle through – wiggle the drill a bit!

See more!


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Every Thursday is #3dthursday here at Adafruit! The DIY 3D printing community has passion and dedication for making solid objects from digital models. Recently, we have noticed electronics projects integrated with 3D printed enclosures, brackets, and sculptures, so each Thursday we celebrate and highlight these bold pioneers!

Have you considered building a 3D project around an Arduino or other microcontroller? How about printing a bracket to mount your Raspberry Pi to the back of your HD monitor? And don’t forget the countless LED projects that are possible when you are modeling your projects in 3D!

Simple Eyewash that can be Mounted on Bottled Water #3DPrinting #3DThursday

Featured preview WhatsApp Image 2019 11 18 at 00 46 45 1

Handicraft shared this project on Thingiverse!


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Every Thursday is #3dthursday here at Adafruit! The DIY 3D printing community has passion and dedication for making solid objects from digital models. Recently, we have noticed electronics projects integrated with 3D printed enclosures, brackets, and sculptures, so each Thursday we celebrate and highlight these bold pioneers!

Have you considered building a 3D project around an Arduino or other microcontroller? How about printing a bracket to mount your Raspberry Pi to the back of your HD monitor? And don’t forget the countless LED projects that are possible when you are modeling your projects in 3D!

Elephant Bank With Plug #3DPrinting #3DThursday

Featured preview DSC01818

SeaBeagle shared this project on Thingiverse!

Big thanks to AdditiveTechSolutions for the start on the idea! I put the original mesh in Fusion 360 and added the hole to get the money out. Lost some polygons there. Then I sketched up a simple plug with a wide base. The plug needs to be made in a flexible filament. Now you can get the money out and protect the counter it sits on. There are two sizes. The original was 128mm tall and the larger which is 200mm tall. The larger is more suited to put larger coins and folded bill inside.

download files: https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:3982629


649-1
Every Thursday is #3dthursday here at Adafruit! The DIY 3D printing community has passion and dedication for making solid objects from digital models. Recently, we have noticed electronics projects integrated with 3D printed enclosures, brackets, and sculptures, so each Thursday we celebrate and highlight these bold pioneers!

Have you considered building a 3D project around an Arduino or other microcontroller? How about printing a bracket to mount your Raspberry Pi to the back of your HD monitor? And don’t forget the countless LED projects that are possible when you are modeling your projects in 3D!

Morphball moneybox #3DPrinting #3DThursday

Featured preview Boule Morphing 1
Kelly_Crystal shared this project on Thingiverse!

A Morphball which can be used as a moneybox. 15 cm diameter.

Assembling:

1) Glue the solid shell and medial ring together. Make sure to glue triangles not facing the shell!

2) Glue the slotted shell and the locking ring. Make sure to align properly shell grooves.

3) Glue the wedge in the cap.

The support is optional. Use it to prevent your ball from rolling.

If you don’t need it as a moneybox: the cap and the wedge become useless. Replace the slotted shell by a mirrored shell.

Download files: https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:3982650


649-1
Every Thursday is #3dthursday here at Adafruit! The DIY 3D printing community has passion and dedication for making solid objects from digital models. Recently, we have noticed electronics projects integrated with 3D printed enclosures, brackets, and sculptures, so each Thursday we celebrate and highlight these bold pioneers!

Have you considered building a 3D project around an Arduino or other microcontroller? How about printing a bracket to mount your Raspberry Pi to the back of your HD monitor? And don’t forget the countless LED projects that are possible when you are modeling your projects in 3D!

Daimler to 3D print spare bus parts using Sintratec S2

Swiss SLS 3D printer manufacturer Sintratec has announced a partnership with German multinational automotive corporation Daimler AG. Sintratec’s S2 3D printer has been installed at the production site of EvoBus GmbH in Neu-Ulm, a subsidiary of the Daimler Trucks & Buses branch. It will be used to further the company’s spare part supply efforts. Already […]

Armatron granted patent for cement 3D printing technology

Armatron, an Arizona-based 3D Construction Printing Company (3DCP), has been granted an extensive patent for a method of reinforced cementitious construction by high-speed extrusion printing.  With this technology, the company aims to overcome the current limitations of conventional construction, with sustainable, full-scale 3D printed structures. Armatron CTO, Brian C. Giles, and COO and co-founder, Blair […]

3d printed holiday tree topper #3DPrinting #3DThursday

IMG 3612

Adafruit forums user XRAD shared this project in the Adafruit technical forums!

Wanted to make something for the holidays so made a tree topper. Uses 11 neopixel jewels in a string mounted to a 3D printed start. The jewels are perfect for lighting up the star arms reflecting and diffusing through each facet. I frankencoded a bunch of fastLED code to get the effects I wanted. The coolest one is the cylon style display as each arm lights up with cool effects.

The neopixel jewels are wired with the first in line at the start apex and then spiral down clockwise through the next two rows of ten arms. I was going to use a PIR sensor, but mine pooped out and was giving me garbage reads, so went with random.

There were a few stumbling blocks like using randomseed and how it effected the flow of the code, but I have it completed and working.

I used 10 of my favorite fastLed displays and modified some and created some. Looks really great. Will post vid when on top o the tree. The links are in the code header for the 3D print.

Learn more!


649-1
Every Thursday is #3dthursday here at Adafruit! The DIY 3D printing community has passion and dedication for making solid objects from digital models. Recently, we have noticed electronics projects integrated with 3D printed enclosures, brackets, and sculptures, so each Thursday we celebrate and highlight these bold pioneers!

Have you considered building a 3D project around an Arduino or other microcontroller? How about printing a bracket to mount your Raspberry Pi to the back of your HD monitor? And don’t forget the countless LED projects that are possible when you are modeling your projects in 3D!