HP Teams with New Balance and Superfeet for 3D-Printed Custom Insoles

HP has announced a further expansion of its customized, 3D-printed insoles business via a partnership with New Balance and Superfeet. Select New Balance stores will now be offering personalized, 3D-printed insoles using the solutions provided by HP and its other partners.

Starting in 2017, HP began offering insoles that could be tailored to the individual through a foot scanning device, dubbed the Fitstation, created with a company called Volumental. The Fitstation is capable of not only capturing the contours of one’s feet, but purportedly also analyzes one’s gait to create a personalized insole design.

The resulting design is then 3D printed using HP’s Multi Jet Fusion technology by a service provider. In the case of this product line, that provider is Flowbuilt Manufacturing in Washington. The insoles are made from BASF’s thermoplastic polyurethane, ULTRASINT, meant to be sufficiently flexible and elastic for footwear applications.

While you will likely have heard of the athletic wear giant New Balance, Superfeet may be less familiar to those without aching arches. The company is an insole and footwear (sandals) manufacturer with products in such stores as REI, Dick’s and Nordstrom’s. In addition to this partnership with New Balance, Superfeet offers 3D-printed products made with the FitStation and MJF, including the Superfeet ME3D insole and ME3D Aftersport Custom Recovery Slides.

A 3D-printed insole made using MJF and the FitStation. Image courtesy of HP.

Superfeet has secured a licensing agreement with New Balance to brand this new line of insoles being manufactured using HP technology, as well as some new off-the-shelf products. Now, customers will be able to purchase New Balance Stride 3D insoles—available in Casual, Running, and Sport styles—at select stores in Canada and the U.S. This expands New Balance’s own footprint in the 3D-printed footwear market, which includes a number of shoes with 3D-printed midsoles.

3D-printed insoles continue to be an important entry point for 3D printing into the consumer market, while also acting as an opportunity to develop mass customization. The possible need for a consumer-specific product is obvious in the case of insoles, given the improved comfort and relief they would ideally provide a wearer. However, the stakes are not as high for companies like HP and New Balance, as insoles are not as complex or expensive to manufacture as an entire shoe. At the same time, it introduces consumers to the concept of personally tailored, 3D-printed goods, while also allowing those brands invested in the technology to further develop the ability to mass customize products.

Though somewhat later to the race than companies like Wiivv and Sols (R.I.P.), HP has the corporate strength to potentially come out ahead. Its latest partnerships with New Balance and Superfeet, demonstrate that it could be quickly moving into first position. However, with Wiivv partnering with Dr. Scholl’s, they may have some steep competition.

HP will be showcasing a range of its 3D-printed footwear products as the ISPO Munich sports business trade show at Booth 205, Hall A5 next week, January 26-29, 2020.  

The post HP Teams with New Balance and Superfeet for 3D-Printed Custom Insoles appeared first on 3DPrint.com | The Voice of 3D Printing / Additive Manufacturing.

How 3D Printing is Shaping the Robotics Industry

As the robotics industry continues to rise in popularity and growth, it makes sense that we would constantly be trying to find new ways to incorporate 3D printing into the robotics process. Both robotics and 3D printing are forward-thinking industries, so combining the two—when done properly—could lead to incredible results.

But how exactly can you mesh robotics and 3D printing into a successful outcome? Here are 4 ways some of the pros have found that work the best. 

To Build Robots

The most common way to do this is to use 3D printing in building actual robots. Of course, the term “robots” may make one think of human-like machines, but robots extend much further than that, from small operating projects to robotics arms and more. 3D printing is incredibly useful when it comes to creating robots, no matter the size or purpose of them: 3D printing makes the process fast and efficient while allowing you to simplify the creation of complex forms. 

To Prototype to Perfection 

Additionally, another great thing about using 3D printing to assist in robotics is the ability to prototype easily. Developing a perfect prototype is the first step in 3D printing your masterpiece, and when it comes to robotics, this can be a lengthy process—and an expensive one! With 3D printing, however, everything is much different—and much better. 

With 3D printing, you’re able to create many different prototypes in order to work out any kinks or flaws before you put your ideas into production. Because robotics can be incredibly complex and detail-oriented, prototyping to perfection is a key step in ensuring ultimate success. 

To Build Drones

Drones are becoming incredibly popular, both among those in the robotics industry and even those who are not! In fact, variations of drones can be purchased everywhere nowadays, from online to in malls and stores. But why buy a drone when you can 3D print a personalized one? 

Many in the robotics field are using 3D printing to make drones that come complete with many special features. When you 3D print your drone, you’re able to fully customize it to your liking, ensuring it performs, looks, and succeeds in all the ways you intend it to. 

To Maintain Consistency in Production

In robotics, machines are often created in batches, all intended to perform the same function. Sometimes they’re used in assembly lines, and other times they’re shipped to different factories or establishes throughout the country. With 3D printing, you’re able to ensure that each machine created will be identical, creating consistency across production, which is vital in terms of efficiency and success.

Want to start using 3D printing for all your robotics needs? Find out how Shapeways can help bring your projects to life and help you reduce costs in the process.

The post How 3D Printing is Shaping the Robotics Industry appeared first on Shapeways Magazine.

GE, ORNL, PARC receive $1.3 million to accelerate energy products with additive manufacturing

GE, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Tennessee, and the Palo Alto Research Center (PARC), a Xerox company, have been awarded an estimated $1.3 million to accelerate the development of 3D printed turbomachinery parts. “Totally Impactful” The funds were granted by the U.S. Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E) Design Intelligence Fostering Formidable Energy Reduction and Enabling Novel Totally Impactful Advanced Technology Enhancements (DIFFERENTIATE) program. Within the DIFFERENTIATE program, the partners […]

100 3D printing experts predict the future of 3D printing in 2030

3D Printing Industry asked 100 additive manufacturing leaders to identify how 3D printing will develop during the next ten years. In our article last week, we took a look at the near term trends in 3D printing to watch for 2020. This new article draws on insights from additive manufacturing experts across the globe to […]

Connected flowerpot by microbit

davallot shared on Thingiverse:

Connected flowerpot by microbit

This flowerpot is made with 3D print and have a microbit card in it.

It contains a Grove moisture soil sensor, a Grove RGB ring led (20 chainable and programmable mini LEDs).

There is a notch under the pot for the micro:bit shield


649-1
Every Thursday is #3dthursday here at Adafruit! The DIY 3D printing community has passion and dedication for making solid objects from digital models. Recently, we have noticed electronics projects integrated with 3D printed enclosures, brackets, and sculptures, so each Thursday we celebrate and highlight these bold pioneers!

Have you considered building a 3D project around an Arduino or other microcontroller? How about printing a bracket to mount your Raspberry Pi to the back of your HD monitor? And don’t forget the countless LED projects that are possible when you are modeling your projects in 3D!

The Adafruit Learning System has dozens of great tools to get you well on your way to creating incredible works of engineering, interactive art, and design with your 3D printer! If you’ve made a cool project that combines 3D printing and electronics, be sure to let us know, and we’ll feature it here!

3D Printing Projects Playlist:

3D Hangout Show Playlist:

Layer by Layer CAD Tutorials Playlist:

Timelapse Tuesday Playlist:

3D Printed Clamshell Tank by @adnarimnavi

Ivan Miranda shared on YouTube:

3D Printed Clamshell Tank

In this episode I assembled and installed the top half of the tank, I used a couple of gas cylinders to help me raise and lower it effortlessly. I installed a zillion bolts but there’s still another zillion left to install. Now that mostly all the parts are on the tank I’ll focus on motion and control but I’m already designing and thinking about what accessories are going to go on the exterior so your suggestions are more than welcome in the comments.


649-1
Every Thursday is #3dthursday here at Adafruit! The DIY 3D printing community has passion and dedication for making solid objects from digital models. Recently, we have noticed electronics projects integrated with 3D printed enclosures, brackets, and sculptures, so each Thursday we celebrate and highlight these bold pioneers!

Have you considered building a 3D project around an Arduino or other microcontroller? How about printing a bracket to mount your Raspberry Pi to the back of your HD monitor? And don’t forget the countless LED projects that are possible when you are modeling your projects in 3D!

The Adafruit Learning System has dozens of great tools to get you well on your way to creating incredible works of engineering, interactive art, and design with your 3D printer! If you’ve made a cool project that combines 3D printing and electronics, be sure to let us know, and we’ll feature it here!

3D Printing Projects Playlist:

3D Hangout Show Playlist:

Layer by Layer CAD Tutorials Playlist:

Timelapse Tuesday Playlist:

The Top 10 SelfCAD Improvements of 2019

Let’s start 2020 with something positive – reflecting on the awesomeness of 2019. 2019 was a productive year for us at SelfCAD. We listened to your feedback, fixed bugs and other nasty things and improved most of our tools. We added a bunch of useful new features. Which one do you like the best?

Here are 10 SelfCAD improvements of 2019 graded by how much they added to your modeling experience. If you’d like to learn more, please visit our FAQ and the SelfCAD Manual.

#10 – Revolve tool can make objects with holes now

2018 Revolve tool closed all the holes. 2020 revolve tool doesn’t. You get the gist. We took a long, hard look at this tool, which creates a new shape out of revolving (for example) a plane. We realized it doesn’t make sense to automatically plug all the holes, and it sometimes makes creating the shape you want unnecessarily difficult. 

You can also revolve around any shape by selecting Revolve Around Edges/Profiles or even guides in the ‘Settings’ section. You no longer need to merge objects to revolve around them.

#9 – Snap Tool

Snap tool is another quality of life tool. You can use it to snap any shape to any location in the workspace. You can also use it to snap and collapse vertices. When used with ‘Remove Duplicate’ tool found in the Utilities section it will remove details in the vertices.

#8 – Drawing Tool Improvements

We’ve made a lot of changes to our drawing tool in 2019.

We’ve added smoothness to the text tool and real-time intersection. Real-time… what?

Before, when you drew something which has a hole in it, you were losing that hole after generating a 3D object from the drawing. Now, this tool creates a hole automatically if you indicate your object should have one!

Additionally, when you use the FreeHand Tool and set the height settings to zero, it will automatically create a profile.

#7 – Flatten, Inflate

SelfCAD added some crucial tools to your toolbox. Flatten and Inflate do exactly what it sounds like – Flatten makes the object gradually flatter, while Inflate will inflate the selected area like a balloon. Flatten is useful for quickly slicing a sphere, among other things.

#6 – Gear Generator

Our (relatively) new Gear Generator is located in the ‘3D Shapes’ category. No need to model your gears by hand, this flexible tool is here to save your time.

#5 – The Marquee Selection Tool

You can now select polygons by dragging your mouse.

If you drag towards the right, it will select only the included faces.  But if you drag towards the left you will select everything. We wanted selection to be as convenient as possible.

#4 – Part Selection Tool

This is a nifty tool that allows everyone to select specific parts of the model.

#3 – New Material Section ( including Shadows, Shininess, Light Sources and Targets )

In 2019 we added additional features to make SelfCAD models look even better while you model. You can now control shadows, shininess of the material, decide if the model is a light source etc. It will work even better with rendering!

#2 – Improved Slicer

The new and improved SelfCAD slicer, we’ve practically remade it. The new menu, more options than ever and you can now get you a preview of how your model will be 3D printed. Which is pretty neat, you have to agree.

#1 – Animation

In October, we added an animator to SelfCAD. It’s our first step to make SelfCAD a choice for every creator. 

When you click the record button, you can change the color, move or transform your 3D model to make a clip and then put these clips together to create something unique.

Up next: we are planning to add rendering in 2020 and a rigger in the future, making this feature feel more complete.

I hope you enjoyed reading this list – create your free SelfCAD account by clicking here.

The post The Top 10 SelfCAD Improvements of 2019 appeared first on 3DPrint.com | The Voice of 3D Printing / Additive Manufacturing.

GE Healthcare Life Sciences Opens $2M 3D Printing Center in Sweden

GE Healthcare Life Sciences has opened a new additive manufacturing (AM) facility in Umeå, Sweden that will be dedicated to integrating 3D-printed parts into the company’s production of biomanufacturing equipment. The site will be its second such center in Sweden, the first of which was opened in Uppsala, Sweden in 2018.

Together, the two centers will be used to for every stage of 3D printing, from prototyping to serial production. While the facility in Uppsala will engage in product design and validation activities, the Umeå perform serial production on those components.

The new site features an EOS 3D printer for polyamide parts, meant for serial production, as well as a powder mixing station and post-processing equipment. GE intends to fabricate parts for such bioprocess products as the newly released launched ÄKTA go chromatography system, as well as HiScale columns and Biacore SPR systems.

GE Healthcare Life Sciences engineers next to the 3D printer in Umeå. Image courtesy of GE Healthcare Life Sciences.

Olivier Loeillot, General Manager BioProcess at GE Healthcare Life Sciences, explained that the location of these centers was decided based on the fact that the company manufactures chromatography resins and bioprocess equipment in Sweden. As a result, GE will be able to deliver its technologies more quickly. As for the choice of 3D printing, Loeillot pointed out that 3D-printed parts are “smaller and more durable” than those made with traditional technology, which translates to “better quality, less waste, and simplified designs.”

Loeillot sees the new center as improving productivity to the company’s supply chain, which will benefit from increased agility offered by 3D printing. While we are still far from on-demand manufacturing closest to the point of use, GE is at least a step closer in co-locating its additive facilities within the same region, though it would have most likely launched any new site nearest to its main hub of activities for any given technology.

Other 3D printing activities engaged in by GE Healthcare include a partnership with Formlabs to 3D print patient-specific anatomical models, a process it wishes to streamline. The company is also working with pharmaceutical giant Amgen to test the viability of a 3D-printed chromatography column.

A 3D-printed anatomical model. Image courtesy of GE Healthcare Life Sciences.

For those following the industry, there’s no need to mention that this is part of a larger strategy on the part of GE to adopt 3D printing wherever possible across its supply chain. After pioneering 3D printing for production of fuel nozzles, then turbine blades in its aerospace division, the conglomerate began 3D printing end parts for its Oil & Gas company in Japan. What could have seemed like an elaborate and expensive marketing campaign with the highly publicized fuel nozzle proved itself to be a commitment to innovation and market dominance across its supply chain.

This most recent facility for GE Healthcare Life Sciences demonstrates that we are just at the beginning of a new era in which AM will be increasingly adopted and really will take a chunk out of the $13 trillion manufacturing sector.

The post GE Healthcare Life Sciences Opens $2M 3D Printing Center in Sweden appeared first on 3DPrint.com | The Voice of 3D Printing / Additive Manufacturing.

3D Hangouts – Mirrors, NeoPixels and Starships

Live stream starts Wednesday, Janurary 22 2020 at 11am ET.

Learn guide, code and build photos and more
https://learn.adafruit.com/infinity-mirror/
https://youtu.be/SFuh2ApT50o

Code on Github
https://github.com/adafruit/Adafruit_Learning_System_Guides/blob/master/ItsyBitsy_Infinity_Mirror/code.py

ItsyBitsy nRF52840
https://www.adafruit.com/product/4481

Mini Skinny NeoPixel Strip
https://www.adafruit.com/product/2970

Lipoly Backpack
https://www.adafruit.com/product/2124

500mah Battery
https://www.adafruit.com/product/1578

Slide Switch
https://www.adafruit.com/product/805

Roll of mirror film
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00FQPGH8I/

Acrylic Disc
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B071Y55MC9/

CircuitPython Downloads: https://circuitpython.org/
https://www.youtube.com/adafruit/live #3DHangouts

3D Parts Library on GitHub
https://github.com/adafruit/Adafruit_CAD_Parts

Layer by Layer – Spheres and Cylinder Snap Fits
https://youtu.be/51pnOzYpGCA

Timelapse Tuesday:
SpaceX Starship / Super Heavy (BFR 2018) – AliShug
https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:3124443
https://youtu.be/x2uZFtHjdYs

1/22/2020 community makes:
https://www.thingiverse.com/make:753422 mario boo planter
https://www.thingiverse.com/make:752709 kingdom keyblade
https://www.thingiverse.com/make:751313 hypotrochoid card