Northwestern University: Researchers Produce Large Scale 3D Printer & Control Heat with HARP Technology

3D printing technology is often seen from the ‘bigger is better’ perspective, especially as researchers and manufacturers continue to out-do each other in digital fabrication of enormous proportions. Now, a team at Northwestern University has created a large-scale, ‘futuristic’ 3D printer capable of printing a prototype or part that is the size of an adult human—and in just two hours.

Using high-area rapid printing (HARP), the research team has made enormous technological progress with throughput never seen before in on-demand manufacturing. And while historically 3D printing users want it all, there are usually numerous trade-offs with that ideal, including missing out on some of the advantages of such technology due to strength in one area and great loss in another—often at the risk of diminishing performance or quality or causing restrictions.

The researchers state that such compromises are not required with HARP technology, featuring a 13-foot-tall printer with a print bed measuring 2.5 square feet. The prototype—projected to be on the market in around 18 months—is currently able to print half a yard of material (whether single, large, or different parts at one time) in one hour, which the research team states is a record.

Chad Merkin (Photo: Northwestern)

“3D printing is conceptually powerful but has been limited practically,” said Northwestern’s Chad A. Mirkin, product development leader. “If we could print fast without limitations on materials and size, we could revolutionize manufacturing. HARP is poised to do that.”

This project evolved as chemists Joseph DeSimone and Mirkin, long-time friends, began working together in the 3D printing field in 2015. DeSimone and colleagues at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill wrote about continuous liquid interface production (CLIP). And while it has been groundbreaking, undeniably, CLIP technology still offers challenges in production also—notably during curing, causing warping and cracking, often due to size. Mirkin’s developers, working within their new company Azul 3D, have worked past such issues by circulating coolant beneath the resin, and then sending it through a unit made for cooling—literally ‘pulling’ the heat from printed parts. This has allowed researchers so far to print objects that are one square meter in cross-section—and over 4 meters high.

Using ‘tiling,’ the researchers use light positioned from four projectors sitting side-by-side during the new SLA process.

(A) A hard, machinable polyurethane acrylate part (print rate, 120 μm/s; optical resolution, 100 μm) with a hole drilled against the print direction. Traditional noncontinuous layer-by-layer printing techniques typically delaminate and fracture when drilled in this orientation. (B) A post-treated silicon carbide ceramic printed lattice (print rate of green polymer precursor, 120 μm/s; optical resolution, 100 μm) stands up to a propane torch (~2000°C). (C and D) A printed butadiene rubber structure (print rate, 30 μm/s; optical resolution, 100 μm) in a relaxed state (C) and under tension (D). (E) Polybutadiene rubber (print rate, 30 μm/s; optical resolution, 100 μm) returns to expanded lattice after compression. (F) A ~1.2-m hard polyurethane acrylate lattice printed in less than 3 hours (vertical print rate, 120 μm/s; optical resolution, 250 μm). Scale bars, 1 cm. (Image: ‘Rapid, large-volume, thermally controlled 3D printing using a mobile liquid interface’)

“Tiling, with our technology, is theoretically unlimited,” Mirkin says.

Converting liquid plastics into solid parts, HARP prints vertically, curing under UV light. Parts can be used in applications for the automotive industry, aerospace, dentistry, and different areas of medicine. More detailed information about their work has also just been published in the recently published ‘Rapid, large-volume, thermally controlled 3D printing using a mobile liquid interface.’

Most 3D printers generate an obvious amount of heat, which can be prohibitive in design on a larger scale. In this case, light is projected through a window, that allows for the removal of heat and circulation through the cooling unit.

The HARP system 3D prints vertically (Image: Northwestern Now)

“Our technology generates heat just like the others,” Mirkin said. “But we have an interface that removes the heat.”

“When you can print fast and large, it can really change the way we think about manufacturing,” Mirkin also added. “With HARP, you can build anything you want without molds and without a warehouse full of parts. You can print anything you can imagine on-demand.”

3D printing varies from one extreme to another, which is one facet of this technology that makes it so exciting. One day you may be reading about 3D printing on the micro-scale or experimenting with nano-composites, and the next, learning about manufactures fabricating parts on the large scale.

What do you think of this news? Let us know your thoughts! Join the discussion of this and other 3D printing topics at 3DPrintBoard.com.

(A) Stationary print interface. (B) Mobile interface. (C) Mobile interface with active cooling. Elapsed time between panels (left to right) is ~500 s; scale bars, 25 mm. Data and thermal color mapping correspond to movies S1 to S3. (Image: ‘Rapid, large-volume, thermally controlled 3D printing using a mobile liquid interface’)

[Source / Images: Science; Northwestern Now; ‘Rapid, large-volume, thermally controlled 3D printing using a mobile liquid interface’]

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Additive Manufacturing Collaboration: Ai Build & WEBER Offer Advanced Large-Scale 3D Printing Solutions

Headquartered in London, Ai Build specializes in making manufacturing easier. Setting their sights on collaborating with Germany’s Hans Weber Maschinenfabrik of WEBER Additive—a manufacturer of plastic extrusion machinery for more than a century—the two teams will work together with the common goal of integrating AiSync into their AM systems.

A 3D printing software meant to work with pellet extrusion based large scale 3D printers, AiSync was just released this earlier this year. So far, Ai Build reports that clientele developing applications in design, construction, and automotive industries are using the software while engaged in fabricating large-scale products.

Ai Build and WEBER will be offering an advanced additive manufacturing package for industrial users 3D printing with engineering-grade polymers and composites, aiming toward construction, infrastructure, automotive, and aerospace. AiSync is different from typical 3D slicing application, offering the ability to create multi-axis, 3D toolpaths that are non-planar and highly optimized—while requiring little effort or input from the operator.

“We are proud to win with Ai Build a highly innovative, revolutionary partner, who—in conformity with us—pursue their vision courageously, with strong goal orientation and focus on ground-breaking success. With the combined expertise of the two companies in complex software (AiSync) and high-quality mechanical engineering, we will be able to offer strong, unbeatable complete solutions for future-oriented additive manufacturing and thus exceed limits, according to the motto: ‘To want the impossible is the prerequisite for creating the possible’ (Karl Liebknecht),” states Markus Weber, executive board of Hans Weber Maschinenfabrik.

Ai Build’s digital twin capabilities for remote operation and machine learning algorithms for automated quality control combined with WEBER Additive’s robust and high throughput 3D printing hardware is aimed to reduce operational costs and accelerate mass adoption of additive manufacturing in construction, infrastructure, automotive and aerospace industries.

“We are very excited to announce this strategic alliance. Weber’s products are known for their high quality by tradition and their ethos are perfectly aligned with our vision for flawless automation. Working with such strong industrial partners allows us to break new grounds in additive manufacturing and deliver the most advanced technology to our clients,” said Daghan Cam, CEO of Ai Build.

If you are in attendance at the K2019—a trade fair for plastics and rubber in Düsseldorf, Germany—running from October 16-23, check out the Ai Build – WEBER Additive booth. The two companies will also be in attendance at Formnext in Frankfurt from November 19-22. Hans Weber Maschinenfabrik will be presenting new extruder technology, along with the new AM machine using AiSync. Products 3D printing during this new collaboration will be on display also.

 

Ai Build has continued on as a dynamic presence in the 3D printing world, involved in other collaborations for large-scale 3D printing and development in materials and sustainability. What do you think of this news? Let us know your thoughts! Join the discussion of this and other 3D printing topics at 3DPrintBoard.com.

[Source / Images: Weber Additive]

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Northwestern researchers develop large scale SLA HARP 3D printer with record throughput

Researchers at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois, have developed a new 3D printer that they claim can print half a yard (457.2 mm) in an hour, a reportedly record-breaking throughput in 3D printing.  Called HARP (high-area rapid printing), the speed and size of the system, standing at 13-feet (3962 mm) tall, can allow users to […]

Interview with the ICSR: A 3D printed gun was not used in the Halle terror attack

Widespread media coverage of the recent attack on a synagogue in Halle, Germany, reported that the gunman responsible was wielding a 3D printed gun. An incredibly abhorrent attack, taking the lives of two people and injuring others, the claims have not gone unnoticed by the 3D printing industry. As cases of this nature are so […]

Qrons is Developing 3D Printable Implants to Treat Brain Injuries

Every year traumatic brain injuries (TBI) affect an average of 69 million individuals worldwide. Although the number is less than one percent of the total global population, it is large enough to draw attention from researchers and companies trying to ease the pain and suffering related to the injury, which is usually the result of a fall, a sports injury and especially traffic accidents. In the United States, it is one of the leading causes of death and disability among children and young adults. With so many biotechnology companies springing up to resolve, via bioprinting, many common afflictions and diseases, one of them has been developing advanced stem cell-based solutions since 2016 to combat neuronal injuries, with a particular focus on TBI and concussions.

Qrons, headquartered in New York, is now going further with their innovative research after they announced an agreement with Dartmouth College, in New Hampshire, for an exclusive worldwide license to develop innovative 3D printable biocompatible materials to treat penetrating brain injuries, and more.

The agreement, signed October on 2, allows Qrons to use a patented 3D process entitled Mechanically Interlocked Molecules-based Materials for 3D Printing as part of its injury-specific 3D printable implants to treat penetrating brain injuries. Qrons is also a funding party to a sponsored research agreement with Dartmouth to advance the license or ownership of additional intellectual property, and the company’s research team is already working closely with Chenfeng Ke, the inventor of the licensed 3D process and an Assistant Professor at the university’s Department of Chemistry, to develop innovative 3D printable, biocompatible advanced materials.

Chenfeng Ke

Chenfeng Ke is currently leading the Ke Functional Materials Group Lab at Dartmouth, which focuses on syntheses and applications of polymeric materials for storage/separation and 3D printing applications. According to the lab, the research scheme overlaps organic synthesis, crystal engineering, polymer synthesis, materials characterization, and 3D printing, with an emphasis on the design of polymeric materials that are noncovalently assembled.

“We are excited to partner with Qrons and continue the development of smart hydrogels with 3D printing capability for the treatment of traumatic brain injuries,” stated Ke, who is also a member of Qrons Scientific Advisory Board.

Today, current treatments to help patients regain function after a TBI focus on reducing secondary injuries, mainly rehabilitation in a hospital or specialized therapy center. It usually involves a physical therapist and occupational specialist to help patients relearn how to walk, talk, and carry out other everyday tasks. Qrons claims that this treatment can partially reduce further damage but do little or nothing to heal the brain.

At Qrons, researchers use a multi-disciplinary approach to treat this highly complex condition, by integrating a 3D printable, customized scaffold with innovative, engineered mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) that target brain injuries to regenerate damaged tissue. The company suggests that these genetically modified MSCs offer a mechanism to secrete a continuous flow of neuro-protective and neuro-regenerative agents to drive TBI repair mechanisms. The agents can prevent further neuronal damage and have the potential to stimulate neurons to migrate to the injury site, regrow axonal processes and regenerate brain tissue.

Qrons already has two product candidates for treating TBIs, both integrating proprietary, modified MSCs and smart synthetic material. The QS100, an injury specific, 3D printable, implantable MSCs-synthetic hydrogel, to treat penetrating brain injuries, and QS200, an injectable MSCs-synthetic hydrogel for the treatment of diffused injuries commonly referred to as concussions.

The exclusive worldwide license for 3D printable materials in the fields of human and animal health will enhance the company’s research, leading to further innovations in a niche field.

“The intellectual property covered by this license has been instrumental in helping us advance our research on the treatment of penetrating brain injuries,” commented Ido Merfeld, Qrons Co-founder and Head of Product. “We believe combining Qrons’ proprietary hydrogel with customizable 3D printing capabilities is an innovative approach to treating traumatic brain injuries, for which there are limited treatments.”

One of 111 bioprinting companies in the world, Qrons is moving fast to research novel techniques for promoting neural recovery. Throughout the last three years, they have entered into research agreements with Ariel University, based in Israel to develop and commercialize products for neuronal tissue regeneration and repair, completed the first in vivo animal experiments for the QS100 and are close to beginning pre-clinical experiments for the QS200.

Jonah Meer

Jonah Meer, also co-founder and CEO, said that “there is a great need for our promising treatments, and this technology is an integral part of our work to develop innovative 3D printable, biocompatible advanced materials.”

As the widespread impact of TBI continues to grow, solutions like the ones proposed by Qrons could mean a different lifestyle for survivors.

[Images: Qrons and Dartmouth College]

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3D Printing News Briefs: October 18, 2019

The stories we’re sharing in today’s 3D Printing News Briefs run the gamut from materials to new printers. Altair has launched its new industrial design solution, and Remet opened a metal 3D printing lab in Poland. Innofil3D is sharing lots of material news, and Equispheres has released the test results for a unique 3D printing powder. Finally, Hackaday published a micro 3D printer project.

Altair Launches New Industrial Design and Rendering Solution

The “Geko Ring Collection,” jewelry by Luca Palmini, designed and rendered with Inspire Studio. Image courtesy of Luca Palmini.

Global technology company Altair has launched Inspire Studio, its new 3D design and rendering solution, to help architects, designers, and digital artists create, evaluate, and visualize designs. The solution builds on the functions of Altair Evolve, and includes 3D rendering and animation software Inspire Render, which helps users rapidly generate photorealistic product renderings and animations. Both Inspire Studio and Inspire Render run on MacOS and Windows, and help designers open up their creativity to go beyond traditional CAID tools. The solutions will be introduced next month during a one-day launch event in Italy, and you can also get a free ticket to formnext 2019, where you can learn more about Inspire Studio and Inspire Render at Altair’s booth E11, hall 11.1.

“We are very pleased with these two new solutions for the global industrial design community. Inspire Studio builds on our previous industrial design tool, Evolve, while going beyond Evolve’s capabilities. Inspire Studio will enhance designers’ creativity by letting them drive their designs. It offers an intuitive user interface and a powerful construction history, allowing them to quickly create and explore multiple iterations of their design. Relying on the same modern user experience with powerful interactive, full progressive and raytracing rendering engine, Inspire Render will help designers quickly run photorealistic renderings and walkthrough animations on GPUs and CPUs,” said James Dagg, CTO at Altair.

3D Design and Rendering Software | Altair Inspire Studio

Remet Opens Modern Metal 3D Printing Laboratory

Polish steel structures manufacturer for the oil and gs mining industry, Remet, has launched a metal 3D printing laboratory equipped with a range of high quality machines and devices. The first of these is the DMP Flex 350 by 3D Systems, followed by 3D Systems’ Figure 4, the office-friendly metallic powder atomizer ATO Lab, and plenty of other specialized research equipment. Remet completed the project together with 3D Lab, a top Polish industrial 3D printer distributor and manufacturer of the ATO Lab.

The ATO Lab metal atomizer, which enables testing and fabrication of many powdered metal alloys, was the starting point for this unique laboratory. A new branch of the enterprise, called Remet Metal Labs, is where the company will work on comprehensive additive manufacturing and industrial applications projects. Its goal is to create highly flexible conditions for creating prototypes in the powder production field, and automotive, aviation, and space industry customers are invited to work with Remet to take advantage of the lab. 3D Lab and Remet will present their solutions together at formnext in Frankfurt next month.

Innofil3D Materials and Design Rules Video

This week, Innofil3D, and its parent company BASF, have a lot of news to share. First up, Ultrafuse BVOH, its water-soluble support filament, is now available for purchase, along with its new Ultrafuse 316L metal filament. Designed for easy FFF 3D printing, this is the company’s first metal material – 80% stainless steel with a 20% polymer content.

For users interested in 3D printing their Innofil3D PRO1 filament on a Raise3D printer, you can now join the Raise3D Open Filament Program to take advantage of optimized settings and print profiles. This new program is a collaboration between Raise3D and filament manufacturers, like Innofil3D, to find the top-performing materials for its 3D printers. Finally, Innofil3D has released its second video tutorial for design rules and principles of FFF 3D printing. Check out the video below, and be sure to visit BASF at its large K-Fair exhibit in Hall 5, C21/D21.

Equispheres Releases Test Results for Unique AM Powder

Materials science technology company Equispheres has released the results from its first powder testing phase, completed by a facility that certifies AM materials for applications in aerospace and defense. The results have confirmed that the powder has exceeded expectations, allowing for a 20-30% increase in mechanical performance and a 50% increase in production speeds. In light of this news, Equispheres is launching new equity financing in order to, as the company wrote in a press release, “grow and unlock the vast potential of Additive Manufacturing.”

“The unique properties of our powder, including the high sphericity, narrow particle size distribution and low surface area results in significantly increased packing density.  This allows an increase of powder layer thickness by a factor of 2 which significantly increases build speed. Most importantly, this boost to build speed does not come with a mechanical performance penalty.  Instead, the uniform nature of our powder ensures that parts are produced with reliable and consistent mechanical properties.  The minimal variance in our performance results provides design engineers the statistical confidence to produce stronger, lighter parts,” said Equispheres’ CTO, Dr Martin Conlon.

Hackaday Project: Micro Deltesian 3D Printer

A new Hackaday project by architect Ekaggrat Singh Kalsi was just published – a micro Deltesian 3D printer, which he says offers a quality that’s on par with any Cartesian 3D printer. The printer has a solid aluminum frame, with a standard slider Y axis and a Delta mechanism for the XZ axis. A 3.5″ LCD touchscreen, with a built-in SD card, is fast and easy enough for his young daughter to use, which was his ultimate goal. With an 80 x 100 x 85 mm build volume and a print bed held in place with magnets, the biggest challenge in making the minuscule 3D printer easy to use was the filament loading; Singh Kalsi used a lever-based latch mechanism for this.

“the micro deltesian was born out of the curiosity of building the convoluted deltesian mechanism,” he explained. “Later on it evolved into the idea of building a 3d printer simple enough to be used by my daughter. The deltesian mechanism seem very wierd when i first saw it but eventually i thought maybe i should give it a try and hence this printer was born.”

Watch the video below to see just how easily his daughter uses the micro Deltesian 3D printer:

Discuss these stories and other 3D printing topics at 3DPrintBoard.com or share your thoughts in the Facebook comments below. 

The post 3D Printing News Briefs: October 18, 2019 appeared first on 3DPrint.com | The Voice of 3D Printing / Additive Manufacturing.

Pros & cons of 3D printing metal components

Metal additive manufacturing comes in a variety of forms, from Laser Powder Bed Fusion (LPBF), to binder jetting, extrusion, and Directed Energy Deposition (DED). As a potential customer looking to apply metal 3D printing, the difficulty is now in which method to choose. Not only is this decision application based, customers also have to consider […]

Origin begins shipment of Origin One 3D printers

Origin, a California-based 3D printer provider, has announced that its Origin One system is now shipping to customers. Due to reported strong demand for the system, the company has moved into a larger office space in San Francisco, and made a new leadership appointment as well. Furthermore, Origin has revealed that two 3D printing service bureaus, Avid […]

Siemens and Materials Solutions open 3D materials Innovation Center in the U.S.

Siemens officially opened the doors to its Innovation Center in Orlando early last week. The 17,000 square foot facility was conceived as a collaboration between Siemens Gas and Power and Materials Solutions, the UK-based metal additive manufacturing business Siemens acquired in 2016. 3D Printing Industry attended the opening event to learn more about the center’s […]