NHF Using Rize One 3D Printer For Custom Facade Fixtures

Facades are a crucial part of many construction efforts, hanging on the sides of skyscrapers and providing crucial access to workers. They’ve been a staple of the construction industry for a while now but one of the premier producers of facades is shaking up the industry with 3D printing. NHF (New Hudson Facades) produces, designs […]

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3D Printed Autonomous Olli Shuttle Makes Debut at University at Buffalo

[Image: Douglas Levere]

The streets are not yet filled with autonomous vehicles, but there are plenty of them in development, and one of the most famous is likely Olli the 3D printed shuttle. Created by Local Motors in partnership with IBM’s Watson IoT’s AutoLAB, Olli is the world’s first co-created, self-driving electric vehicle, and it has already been deployed to shuttle commuters in Washington, D.C. and Berlin. Now Olli is launching operations at the University at Buffalo, bringing its and forward-thinking technology and sustainability to the campus.

“Our partnership with UB is about progressing development of autonomous vehicles forward through open collaboration and the sharing of data,” Matthew Rivett, Local Motors Executive Vice President, told 3DPrint.com.

The University at Buffalo will use Olli for autonomous vehicle education and mapping while also testing it for campus transportation. The project is being co-managed by the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority and the New York State Department of Transportation, and supports Governor Andrew M. Cuomo’s goal to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 40 percent by 2030.

“We are pleased to partner with the University at Buffalo and the State of New York to implement and customize Olli for their mobility testing and sustainability strategies,” said Rivett. “This partnership showcases how campuses, states, and others can invest in and explore the future of transportation. Local Motors looks forward to assisting UB and future partners on practical solutions and research opportunities for mobility challenges.”

Though there are still concerns about the safety of autonomous vehicles, Olli has been shown to be a safe and reliable mode of transportation in a variety of settings. The shuttle is customizable and can be used as a singular vehicle or as part of a larger train of vehicles. Olli’s 3D printed construction easily enables its customization options, as well as being an efficient and eco-friendly means of production. The autonomous shuttle was first created in 2016, and is leading the way for other self-driving vehicles in development, many of which are also employing 3D technology.

“We’re excited to have the Olli shuttle on campus, advancing the state as a leader in driverless technology while expanding our knowledge of human-automation interaction, critical to understanding artificial intelligence and machine learning,” said University at Buffalo Vice President for Research and Economic Development Venu Govindaraju. “We’ve designed UB’s ecosystem — from world-class researchers and facilities to dynamic partnerships with government and industry — to support these opportunities that foster discovery, innovation, and collaboration.”

Olli is a highly sustainable transportation option, as it encourages commuters to employ mass transit and also runs off of electricity. Before individuals begin driving autonomous cars, we are likely to see more self-driving mass transit options like Olli. Olli isn’t a super-speedy vehicle, with a maximum speed of 25 mph, but as a shuttle, it doesn’t need to be. The autonomous vehicle is especially well-suited to environments like college campuses or city streets – you won’t see Olli flying down a highway anytime soon. The next step in autonomous vehicles may be self-driving individual cars, but we’re not quite at that point yet. Until then, commuters can take advantage of the major step forward in technology that is the self-driving shuttle.

Discuss this and other 3D printing topics at 3DPrintBoard.com or share your thoughts below.

[Source: Local Motors/Images: Douglas Levere]

XYZprinting Introduces Its New Full-Color Option: The da Vinci Color mini 3D Printer

Taiwan-based 3D printer manufacturer XYZprinting almost always has a new 3D printer to introduce whenever an industry event or trade show rolls around. At last year’s IFA exhibition, the company unveiled its da Vinci Color 3D printer, and is now expanding its portfolio even further at IFA 2018 with the release of its consumer-oriented da Vinci Color mini.

Part of the company’s Color series, the compact, full-color da Vinci Color mini uses 3DColorJet technology, which combines FFF 3D printing with inkjet technology, so users can turn their ideas into colorful reality.

“Desktop full-color 3D printing is here. Now, consumers can purchase an easy-to-operate, affordable, compact full-color 3D printer for $30,000 less than market rate,” said Simon Shen, CEO of XYZprinting. “This is revolutionary because we are giving the public access to technology that was once only available to industry professionals. We are proud to be the industry leader in desktop, full-color 3D printing.”

The new da Vinci Color mini by XYZprinting, weighing in at just 53 lbs, is convenient and lightweight enough to be easily placed on any desktop or table top, while also providing the same high level of versatility and quality that XYZprinting is known for. This makes it the perfect 3D printer for designers, entrepreneurs, and STEAM students.

The 3D printer, which the company says is “a modern full-color 3D printing solution to traditional bulky and expensive full-color 3D printers,” works seamlessly, thanks to several features like WiFi connectivity, an EZ removable print bed, hands-free automatic calibration, and a 5″ color touchscreen LCD panel for user-friendly, intuitive operation.

Additional features include:

  • Complete full-color 3D printing capabilities (3-in-1 CMY ink cartridges)
  • Upgradable laser engraving function for leather, wood, and more
  • Mono-color 3D printing in PLA, PETG, and Tough PLA
  • Full-color 3D printing in Color PLA
  • 5.1″ x 5.1″ x 5.1″ build volume
  • Fully enclosed
  • UL certified

The compact da Vinci Color mini is easy to set up, so users can get right down to the business of 3D printing. XYZprinting’s 3DColorJet technology is able to provide a full spectrum of millions of colors, which can be applied to various layers in 3D prints.



The da Vinci Color mini was designed for all sorts of consumer and professional 3D printer users, such as producers who create prototypes of film and animation models that need to be available for immediate use post-print, and educators looking to add full-color 3D printing capabilities into their classrooms. This 3D printer is also perfect for small business owners looking to open their own 3D printing business, designers and architects who want to help clients get a better idea of their final product with the help of miniature landscapes and scaled down models, geek culture collectors and fans, and just daily consumers in need of a more cost-effective 3D printing solution.

XYZprinting’s new da Vinci Color mini 3D printer retails for $1599.95, but early adopters can save $600 by pre-ordering it on Indiegogo; it should be shipped to crowdfunding backers in October of 2018.

The da Vinci Color mini will also be on display later this month at IFA 2018, which will be held at the Berlin Exhibition Grounds in Germany from August 31st to September 5th. You can see the 3D printer for yourself at the company’s Booth 107 in Hall 12.

What do you think of the XYZprinting’s da Vinci Color mini? Discuss this new 3D printer, and other 3D printing topics, at 3DPrintBoard.com or share your thoughts in the comments below.

[Images provided by XYZprinting]

Sydney Researchers Developing iFix Eye Treatment 3D Pen

Researchers at the University of Sydney are looking to develop an entirely new portable method for treating particular corneal complications. The research team have come up with the iFix for sealing eye wounds as treatment for corneal ulcerations, which works by coloring in with bioinks the same way one would with a 3D printing pen. […]

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Researchers Develop Highly Stretchable Hydrogel For 3D Printing

From biomedicine to soft robots discoveries, hydrogels have opened a whole new world for 3D printing applications. They’ve been around for a while, providing crucial research into cell regeneration and tissue growth and so much more. Now, a new research project between Singapore University of Technology and Design (SUTD) and the Hebrew University of Jerusalem (HUJI) […]

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LulzBot releases 3D Aerostruder Micro Tool Head for “penny-scale” 3D printed parts

Aleph Objects, the Colorado-based manufacturer of the LulzBot range of desktop 3D Printers, has unveiled a new, high-precision tool head at SIGGRAPH 2018 in Vancouver –  the LulzBot Aerostruder v2 Micro. With the ability to 3D print penny-scale parts, the LulzBot Aerostruder v2 Micro tool head can be used with both flexible and rigid filament for […]

3D Printing News Sliced, $11M project call, SLM Solutions, Aconity3D, Onshape

This edition of our 3D printing news digest Sliced features an $11 million funding pool  for flexible electronics; metal 3D printing’s expansion in the U.S.; life-changing fundraising for 3D bioprinters; mind-boggling 3D printed ceramics and more. Read on for the latest news from NextFlex, SLM Solutions, Aconity3D, Onshape, Bristol Children’s Hospital and Cunicode. NextFlex offers $11 […]

3D Printed Magnets In Functional Assemblies Could Lead to New Machines and Medical Devices

Since 3D printing began to diversify, allowing for the printing of materials beyond just metal and plastic, scientists have been experimenting with the 3D printing of magnets. 3D printed magnets can be made more quickly and less expensively than more conventional methods of production, and they can be easily made into complex geometries if so desired. While many researchers have 3D printed magnets, however, few actual use cases exist, but a new study entitled “3D Printing of Functional Assemblies with Integrated Polymer-Bonded Magnets Demonstrated with a Prototype of a Rotary Blood Pump,” applies 3D printed magnets to a rotary blood pump. Successfully 3D printing magnets embedded in 3D prints could open up the world to a whole host of new 3D printing applications. Tiny machines, medical devices, motors are just some of the things that could be possible. By letting a housing or another part of a device function as the case but also as a magnet the form factor and functionality of many devices could change radically.

To 3D print the pump, the ETH Zurich researchers created a filament made from thermoplastic combined with isotropic NdFeB powder. The material was used to 3D print a prototype of a turbodynamic pump with integrated magnets in the impeller and housing. The pump was 3D printed in one piece on a low-cost, consumer-level 3D printer (a Prusa i3 MK2 with a multi-material upgrade, to be exact), then the magnetic components were fully magnetized in a pulsed Bitter coil.

Besides heart transplantation, rotary blood pumps are the only option for patients suffering from end-stage heart failure. The pumps use magnets as critical components in the driving and bearing systems of the impeller. Unfortunately, currently available pumps have the side effects of hemolysis and thrombus formation, which manufacturers are attempting to address in the development of next-generation pumps. Regular 3D printing is being applied in the development of rotary blood pumps, but according to the researchers, to their knowledge, 3D printed magnets are not being used for testing new designs of medical devices.

“The basic design of the pump prototype is similar to that of conventional RBP designs—however, complicated geometries with inside twists and undercut elements would not allow for conventional manufacturing,” the researchers explain. “The bearing concept for the impeller consisted of two passive magnetic bearings for radial forces and a pivot tip for axial forces. For the radial magnetic bearings, hollow cylinder magnets were integrated into the impeller and housing. The impeller comprises of four blades with twisted internal blade channels in a helical shape around the inflow axis. In each of the blades, a driving magnet was embedded just above the bottom surface. The shape of the magnet was matched to the blade geometry, thereby maximizing the magnet volume. The impeller was actuated by magnetic coupling to a set of matching non-printed permanent magnets spinning on a servo motor just below the housing.

The pump was 3D printed on the first try, in a print that took about 15 hours. Arbitrarily-shaped magnets were integrated into the pump, and the magnetic filament, which the researchers called MagFil, was able to be printed from a standard spool without breaking. The hydraulic performance of the pump was then tested with water using an ultrasonic flow probe and pressure sensors at the pump inlet and outlet.

“An operation of the pump prototype at a maximum rotational speed of 1000 rpm, with a flow rate of 3 L/min against a pressure head of 6 mmHg was achieved,” the researchers state. “At higher rotational speeds, the magnetic coupling broke off and the delivered flow rate decreased concomitantly. The pump prototype could therefore not deliver a sufficient flow rate at head pressures that are realistic for clinically used RBPs.”

The researchers attributed this failure to inferior print quality caused by some difficulties with multi-material printing, but they still concluded that 3D printing is a promising method for speeding up the development process for medical devices and for creating devices with integrated magnets with geometrical complexity.

Authors of the paper include Kai von Petersdorff-Campen, Yannick Hausworth, Julia Carpenter, Andreas Hagmann, Stefan Boës, Marianne Schmid Daners, Dirk Penner and Mirko Meboldt.

Discuss this and other 3D printing topics at 3DPrintBoard.com or share your thoughts below.

 

3D printed ballet shoe eases the pain of dancers

Hadar Neeman, a graduate of the Bezalel Academy of Art and Design, Jerusalem, has designed and 3D printed a pain-reducing durable ballet shoe. As part of her final university project, Neeman designed the custom 3D printed pointe ballet shoe called P-rouette. A pointe shoe is customarily worn by ballet dancers to dance en pointe. This […]

Duke University’s 3D Printing Innovation Lab Allows Surgeons to Create Accurate 3D Printed Medical Training Models

3D printers in Duke University’s Innovation Co-Lab [Image: Innovation Co-Lab Studio]

3D printing is becoming increasingly more accessible and affordable in many industries, including the medical field. We often see the technology used for the purposes of creating accurate training models and simulators, so that medical professionals can practice surgeries and procedures ahead of time – this not only saves on costs, but can also allow surgeons to offer a better level of care.

Tawfig Khoury, MD, an otolaryngology (ear and throat) resident at Duke University, is focused on the latter, and uses 3D printing to improve patient care. He makes 3D printed medical models of the ear’s delicate temporal bones, which are later used for the purposes of medical training.

“One focus of my research has been taking CT scans of temporal bones, and printing an exact, patient-specific replica. Our residents can then practice drilling and performing other tests without having to work on an actual patient,” Dr. Khoury explained.

Tawfiq Khoury, MD, Otolaryngology
Resident

Dr. Khoury works on his 3D printed models at the university’s Innovation Co-Lab Studio, which contains a network of over 80 3D printers, ranging from MakerBot and Markforged to Ultimaker and Formlabs, that have been used for various projects since the facility began to really grow last year and explore new uses for 3D printing at the university.

“With recent renovations, we now have a state-of-the-art facility, with high-end equipment across an entire floor dedicated to the lab,” Dr. Khoury said.

“The Innovation Lab is a great example of how different departments across the hospital, as well as other healthcare groups, residents, and students, can work together to create something of value for the community.”

The lab, previously described as a “creativity incubator,” also includes 3D scanning equipment, CNC machines and laser cutters, digital modeling workstations, and a multitude of electronics.

Physicians from several of the university’s medical specialties, including cardiology, neurosurgery, and neurology, use the patient record system Epic to access an ordering system in order to have medical models 3D printed in the studio from ultrasounds and CT and MRI scans. Occasionally, the Innovation Co-Lab Studio can provide its 3D printing services at no cost if the 3D printed replica models are created specifically for patient care.

One of the 80 3D printers in Duke University’s Innovation Co-Lab Studio [Image: Cara O’Malley]

In order to receive and handle requests for 3D prints from around the world, the studio uses 3DPrinterOS, the popular online cloud management system, as a service to the university’s community. 3DPrinterOS users have access to an online, live-streaming video of the project while it’s being 3D printed.

Since the facility’s expansion, a wider community of users have been taking advantage of its services. The expansion also gives Dr. Khoury the opportunity to, according to a post by Scott Behm with Duke’s Department of Surgery, “set his sights on some short- and long-term goals.”

Dr. Khoury feels that 3D printing, even though it can already create accurate models for the purposes of medical training, can go even further at the university. Before his residency at Duke is complete, he hopes to set up an efficient system in order to assist patients with facial trauma who must have maxillofacial reconstruction surgery. His main goal in this is to enable the routine creation of 3D printed models for eventual use in implants for this type of procedure.

Someday in the future, Dr. Khoury believes that we will be able to rely on 3D printers as a way to create organic replacement organs or body parts out of bioink or hydrogel, such as an eardrum, which can then be infused with live cells and implanted in a patient’s body.

Discuss this story and other 3D printing topics at 3DPrintBoard.com or share your thoughts in the Facebook comments below.